CFP: Fifth University of Florida Classics Graduate Symposium

Call for Papers

Saturday, February 26, 2022 

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL) 

 

Fifth University of Florida Classics Graduate Student Symposium

At the Margins: New Perspectives on the Ancient Mediterranean

 

Many of the traditional research trajectories in the field of Classics focus on limited perspectives that hinder a robust understanding of the societies that comprised the Ancient Mediterranean. As Classics seeks to address the concerns of the 21st century, some long ignored or forgotten elements of ancient studies are helping paint a more vivid and accurate image of the realities we study. To continue the conversation that frames the Ancient Mediterranean in a full context, we seek pioneering approaches to inquiries on the ancient world. How should “Ancient Mediterranean” and “Classics” be defined? Who has been historically categorized as “other,” and what are the consequences of such distinctions? Whose overlooked perspectives (non-canonical authors, marginalized ethnic or social groups, disenfranchised individuals, etc.) can illuminate less-explored aspects of the Greco-Roman world (and beyond)? How can our field(s) benefit from such perspectives, and what are some methods with which we can begin to center them in our classrooms?  

 

We invite papers that will discuss such topics from the fields of classics, art history, literature, and archaeology with a focus on Ancient Mediterranean cultures. Pressing issues we seek to discuss include hearing the voices of oppressed peoples, observing overlooked or neglected accomplishments and narratives, understanding marginalized groups in light of modern methods, and viewing the ancient world from a non-elite, decolonized lens. While our focus is on the Ancient Mediterranean, we encourage submissions that compare these cultures to other ancient, medieval, or modern cultures. Interdisciplinary submissions are also encouraged.   

 

Topics may include but are not limited to:  

 

  • Archaeological or socio-cultural studies examining liminal groups such as women, children, prostitutes, differently abled persons, prisoners, laborers, foreigners, etc.   
  • Textual or visual approaches from the ancient or modern world with the main subject matter concerning marginalized groups  
  • Literary and/or linguistic approaches to lesser-known works of literature, particularly those authored by writers of commonly disregarded groups  
  • Topics focusing on societies located at or beyond the margins of the major empires of classical study (Greece and Rome)  
  • Traditional research trajectories explored through modern lenses such as feminist or Marxist criticism 
  • Methods to incorporate the study of marginalized groups in modern educational settings  
  • Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean by ancient or modern cultures, specifically those less represented in classical scholarship 

Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words by October 1, 2021 by emailing a .docx attachment to gradsymposium@classics.ufl.edu. Please include your name, affiliation, and the title of your abstract in the body of your email. Final papers should be no longer than 20 minutes. Selected proceedings completed via a double-blind peer review process will be published by the UF Smathers Libraries Press.  

 

Any questions should be addressed to the same email address.   

 

N.B. The Symposium is currently scheduled to be hosted in person at the University of Florida, following any remaining university, local, or national pandemic restrictions. However, we can accommodate participants who would prefer to present remotely. If necessary, we are also prepared to host the entire Symposium online.   

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