CFP: Greek Literary Topographies in the Roman Imperial World

GREEK LITERARY TOPOGRAPHIES IN THE ROMAN IMPERIAL WORLD

The Pennsylvania State University, 16-18 April 2021

Workshop Organizers:

Anna Peterson, Penn State

Janet Downie, UNC-Chapel Hill

Keynote Speaker:

Jason König, University of St. Andrews

Confirmed Speakers:

Pavlos Avlamis

Artemis Brod

William Hutton

Bryant Kirkland

Kate Gilhuly

Karen ní Mheallaigh

Estelle Strazdins

As spatial theorists like Lefebvre, Foucault, and Soja have shown, space is not static, but dynamic – both reflecting and engendering processes of interpretation and cultural construction. By extension, in a literary context, space does not simply provide the backdrop against which events “take place.” Rather, literary topographies create relationships – both within the text and beyond it – connecting individuals to one another and to shared social worlds, both real and imagined. For scholars of Classics, this means that the representation of space in ancient literature offers another way of understanding the shape of ancient society, its political, religious and cultural concerns. There is now a considerable body of scholarship on the literary topographies of the city of Rome and on the geography of empire in Latin literature, as well as important work on spatial perspectives in Greek literature of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. Prominent examples of the latter include Alex Purves’ Space and Time in Ancient Greek Narrative, Kate Gilhuly’s Erotic Geographies in Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, William Thalmann’s Apollonius of Rhodes and the Spaces of Hellenism and Irene de Jong’s volume, Space in Ancient Greek Literature.

This workshop aims to broaden the discussion to include Greek literature of the Imperial period. While space has been explored in relation to explicitly topographical writers (e.g., Pausanias, Strabo) and in the context of the Greek novel, spatial descriptions outside of these genres have been treated as primarily as scene-setting devices or ekphrastic excursus. Beginning from the essential questions of how authors of the imperial period evoke different spaces and why they describe them in the ways that they do, this workshop will interrogate the relationship between lived space, society, and power and its depiction in literature.

Participants are encouraged to think about these issues as they relate not just to explicitly topographical writers but also to the rhetorical, philosophical, and fictional literature of the period. We are interested both in papers that probe the specifics of a given author or text and that think more theoretically about spatiality at this time. In addition, we also invite approaches that draw comparisons to other periods of literature – whether earlier or later – and to other traditions (e.g. Latin, Jewish and Christian).

Workshop Format:

Participants will pre-circulate papers at the end of February 2021, and the workshop will include brief presentations with formal responses and discussion. We are currently planning for a hybrid format, including both in-person and online participation, so that we can adapt as necessary to institutional and personal circumstances relating to travel and gathering.

Abstract Submission:

Please submit abstracts of no more than 800 words (including bibliography), as well as a CV, by 15 September 2020 to either of the Workshop Organizers by email: Anna Peterson, aip12@psu.edu; Janet Downie, jdownie@email.unc.edu. Notification of acceptance will be given in early October.

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In last year’s introductory Greek class, I watched a student rejoice when asked to give a (partial) synopsis of the verb ‘λύω.’ While synopses are rarely met with enthusiastic responses, this student knew that the synopsis, if correctly produced, would make him stronger. My class was playing Olympus, a term-length board game played in one-hour instalments throughout the quarter, and he had just drawn the Agōgē card.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/21/2020 - 4:04pm by Joshua J. Hartman.
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August, 2020

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Eleni Hasaki (University of Arizona) and Diane Harris Cline (George Washington University) - "Social Networks of Athenian Potters: Networks, Tradition and Innovation in Communities of Artists"
  • Rega Wood (Indiana University, Bloomington) - "Richard Rufus Project"
  • Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) - "Digital Ancient Rome"
  • Noah Heringman (University of Missouri, Columbia) - "Vetusta Monumenta: Ancient Monuments, a Digital Edition"
  • Alexander Jones (New York University) - "The ANcient Sciences in Cross-Cultural Perspective"
  • Rachel Kousser (CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center) - "The Last Years of Alexander the Great (330-323 BCE)"
  • Michael Satlow (Brown University) - "Seeking the Gods: The Spiritual Landscape of Late Antiquity"
  • Pramit Chaudhuri (University of Texas, Austin) - "Computational Tools for Diachronic and Cross-cultural Study of Literature: Multilingual Stylometry and Phylogenetic Profiling"
  • Jessica Powers (San Antonio Museum of Art) - "Art, Nature, and Myth in Ancient Rome"

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:57am by Erik Shell.

American Philosophical Society, RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Information and application instructions for all of the Society's programs can be accessed at our website, http://www.amphilsoc.org. Click on the "Grants" tab at the top of the homepage.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:48am by Erik Shell.

Preliminary CfP: Edited Volume on “Cicero in Greece, Greece in Cicero”

Submissions are invited for an edited volume on “Cicero in Greece, 
Greece in Cicero”.

In 2021 it will be 2100 years since Cicero’s trip to Greece in 79 BCE, 
which was a significant factor in moulding him as an orator, 
philosopher and politician. This provides the opportunity to put 
together new and unpublished material on Cicero’s presence in Greece 
literally, namely for the years he spent in nowadays Modern Greek 
territory, including his aforementioned travel in 79/78 BCE and the 
period of his exile in 58/57 BCE, and metaphorically, that is the 
reception of Cicero in Late Roman, Byzantine, Post-Byzantine, Early 
Modern, and Modern Greece through translations, studies, imitations, 
etc. It is also an opportunity to approach from a new point of view 
the presence of Greece in Cicero, namely how the Greek world, people, 
language, civilisation, history, philosophy, politics and political 
theory, religion, geography, etc. appear in his work.

Abstracts for proposed submissions are invited on any of the 
aforementioned topics. Diverse, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary 
and other approaches to the material are welcome and encouraged. Early 
career researchers are also encouraged to apply.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:46am by Erik Shell.

Call for Participants
Veteran Politics and Memory: A Global Perspective

Department of History, University of Warwick
16th and 17th April 2021

From the fields of Gettysburg to the beaches of Normandy, the participation and presence of former soldiers has been an integral part of the memorial culture of many conflicts. As survivors of war, veterans are often portrayed a group imbued with a unique knowledge whose experiences should not be forgotten. Yet while public commemorations have sought to establish consensus about the meaning of the past, veterans’ memories have also been a source of conflict and contestation, engaged in struggles over rights, recognition, and the authority to remember the past and speak for the future.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:35am by Erik Shell.

Congratulations to the three winners of the 2020 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. The award recognizes outstanding achievement in classical scholarship. You can read the full award citations by clicking on the names of the winners below:

Paul J. Kosmin

Kelly Shannon-Henderson

Steven D. Smith

Paul J. Kosmin, Time and its Adversaries in the Seleucid Empire (Harvard University Press, 2018)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/09/2020 - 12:02pm by Helen Cullyer.

Unattainable wishes for the present or past may be entirely reasonable.

– Smyth’s Greek Grammar, “Wishes” §2156.5

Picture the heroine in the sand, wind-lashed and desperate, cursing the hero who left her behind. She’s Medea, she’s Ariadne, she’s Dido. Each of the three make a similar wish:

 

If only that ship had never reached my shores

If only that ship had never sailed

If only that ship had never even been built.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/07/2020 - 10:40am by Hilary Lehmann.

Call for Application and Nominations for Editor of TAPA (2022-2025)

The current TAPA Editor Andromache Karanika will end her term of service with volume 151 (2021). Therefore, we are now opening a search for the next TAPA Editor, to cover volumes 152-155 (2022-2025), and inviting applications and nominations for the position.

TAPA is the only journal published by the Society for Classical Studies. Though founded as a philological journal, TAPA is now expected to reflect a broad spectrum of topics, sub-fields, and theoretical and methodological approaches within Greek and Roman Studies.

Qualifications:

The Editor must be a member in good standing of the SCS.

Candidates should have some experience and understanding of the journal publication process, but prior journal editing experience is not necessary.

Responsibilities:

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 09/01/2020 - 12:00pm by Erik Shell.

The Classics program at Austin Peay State University is pleased to invite submissions for the fifth volume of Philomathes: An Online Journal of Undergraduate Research in Classics.  This refereed on-line journal publishes original research projects carried out by undergraduate students in any area of Classics.  Submissions are welcome from current undergraduates and those who have recently completed their undergraduate education (within one year of graduation).  The deadline for submissions for the next issue is Monday, November 16, 2020 with an online publication date scheduled for May 2020. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/01/2020 - 7:48am by Erik Shell.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways.

How can we continue to encourage engagement with the ancient world as many transition to an online existence? Three Classics Everywhere projects have found creative and innovative ways to continue their work through the obstacles the COVID-19 pandemic has produced: a feminist adaptation of the Odyssey in the form of a chamber opera; an after-school Latin program in New York City’s Morningside Heights; and the launch of a new site and social media campaign aimed to inspire passion for ancient studies.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/31/2020 - 4:07pm by .

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