CFP: (In)equity and Marginalization in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Now and Then: (In)equity and Marginalization in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

March 12th and 13th, 2021 (via Zoom)

The First Biennial Bryn Mawr College SPEAC Conference for Undergraduate and Graduate Research

Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2020

Bryn Mawr College’s new group SPEAC (Students Promoting Equity in Archaeology and Classics) is happy to announce our first biennial research conference, to be held virtually. As a group, we are dedicated to amplifying the voices of academically marginalized and underrepresented communities (including, but not limited to, BIPOC, FGLI, disabled, and LGBTQ+ scholars) in the fields of Greek, Latin, Classical Studies, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies. For this conference, we are seeking research from undergraduate and graduate students, as well as unaffiliated and unfunded early-career scholars, that centers around topics of racism, white supremacy, race, identity, gender, justice, and inequity in both the ancient world and the modern disciplines that study it. As this is our inaugural conference, we are keeping the theme deliberately expansive; our idea is that future years will have more nuanced themes.

The fields of Classics, Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies can not ignore the racist and white supremacist underpinnings of our disciplines, and we as young and/or early-career scholars have an ethical obligation to interrogate and address the ways in which our fields have benefited from and perpetuated inequity and elitism. Problems of racism, sexism, ableism, and homophobia are nowhere near new to our disciplines, and this summer’s protests and calls for accountability and reform spurred largely by the murder of George Floyd (as just one victim in a long history of systemic racism) have highlighted the importance of meaningfully addressing Classics’ complicity in these structures. Academia does not have the privilege of operating within a vacuum, so it is incumbent upon us to understand how to make our work socially and politically relevant. We must examine our field’s relationship with frameworks rooted in injustice as well as such issues in the ancient world to fully understand how to utilize our studies for real good. This conference is aimed at working toward these ideals and amplifying the many voices already engaging in these discussions.

Potential paper topics include:

  • Conceptions of identity (race, ethnicity, class, and/or gender) in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East
  • Conceptions of status (inequality, marginalization, immigration, and outcasts) in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East
  • Problems inherent to the term “Classics” and periodization as a whole
  • Marginalization and white supremacy in the historiography of our disciplines
  • Disability studies in the ancient world and/or in the modern fields of Classics, Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies
  • Reception—whether that’s a white supremacist group interpreting a historiographical text to support their racist ideology, or a Black filmmaker interpreting a Greek tragedy as an act of political resistance—we want to talk about both the destructive and constructive potentials of reception and reception theory
  • Methods for using work in these fields for social justice purposes
  • Anti-racist work in the classroom, publishing, etc.
  • Current racism and inequity in our fields

This list is by no means exhaustive, and we are very open to highlighting a wide variety of topics. We are hoping to have 2 panels on the first day focusing on the ancient world, followed by a keynote speaker; then the second day will feature 2 panels focusing on the modern field, followed by a summative roundtable discussion. This obviously depends on the submissions we receive, but our goal is a relatively even distribution of work focusing on the ancient world and the modern. Papers should be around 15 minutes in length.

Please fill out this form to submit your 300-word abstract. Feel free to email brynmawrspeac@gmail.com with any questions or concerns. Abstracts are due by December 1st and we aim to get back to applicants by the middle of January.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The following members were elected in the ballot held this Summer. They take office in January 2022, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.  Thank you to all SCS members who agreed to stand for election this year.

President-Elect

Matthew Roller

Financial Trustee  

Joseph Farrell
Vice President for Education

Teresa Ramsby

Program Committee

Rosa Andújar

Board of Directors

Young Richard Kim

Nandini Pandey

Nominating Committee

Ronnie Ancona

Pramit Chaudhuri

Goodwin Committee

Rhiannon Ash

Yopie Prins

Professional Ethics Committee

Deborah Beck

James Rives

Referendum items on converting appointed to elected positions on the board: Conversion of all three positions (graduate student member, contingent faculty member, and Equity Advisor) was approved.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 09/23/2021 - 3:59pm by Erik Shell.

SEARCH FOR EDITOR OF THE CLASSICAL OUTLOOK
 
 

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 09/22/2021 - 10:31am by Erik Shell.

Deadline Extension

We've extended the deadline for the SCS Outreach Prize to September 27, 2021.

The annual Outreach Prize of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), a prize of $300, recognizes an outstanding project or program by an SCS member or members that makes available and accessible an aspect of classical antiquity to an audience other than Classics scholars or students at their home institutions.

You can send nomination materials to the Executive Director at xd@classicalstudies.org

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 09/21/2021 - 2:39pm by Erik Shell.

Experiencing Space: Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages VIII

Tampere, August 17-19, 2022 (in person/hybrid conference)

The focus of the Passages conference series lies on society and the history of everyday life. This time we are concentrating on the social construction and experiences of space, aiming to understand how it affected social frameworks, built communities and shaped individual lives. The “Spatial Turn” has directed scholars’ interest towards the interconnection between communities, individuals and space, but larger comparisons between eras and cultures are still mainly missing. We aim to approach space as an analytical tool, “experience” offering a novel conceptual method for the study in this field.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/21/2021 - 1:07pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Horror vacui: Fear of Space in the Ancient World

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

Conducted virtually via Zoom

New York University

November 5th, 2021

Keynote: Amy Russell (Brown University)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 4:18pm by Erik Shell.
A tan piece of paper with a pencil drawing of part of a double helix shape, comprised of lines and circles

One of the things that makes Classics exciting is its openness to new ideas and innovative approaches to the study of antiquity. For instance, classicists have been in the vanguard of the digital humanities, using new methods to curate and analyze texts (e.g. TLG, DLL, Open Greek and Latin, and so on), inscriptions (EAGLE, PHI), and papyri (papyri.info), adopting innovative GIS technologies and platforms (Pleiades, Orbis), and deploying powerful tools to unlock precious fragments of lost works. Classical archaeologists, too, have a particularly strong tradition of openness to new tools and techniques, from isotope geochemistry in the study of ancient marble to novel ways of cataloguing and quantifying material and visualizing ancient structures and sites. Vibrant subfields like bioarchaeology and zooarchaeology are inherently interdisciplinary. More broadly, ideas and approaches informed by anthropology, economics, and psychology have enriched the study of antiquity for decades.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:54pm by .

Res Difficiles 2022

Organizers:              Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and

Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

Date:                          Friday, May 20, 2022

Abstract Deadline:  Friday, December 3, 2021

Platform:                    Webinar

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:24pm by Erik Shell.
A black krater vase with red-figure depicts Zeus caressing Io while Hermes slays Argus

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

This post centers on two projects that employ Greek and Roman literature in innovative ways to deal with contemporary issues. The first project draws inspiration from Euripides’ Trojan Women to facilitate the expression and sharing of intense experiences between students in the University of California and female prisoners, while the second project adapts Ovid’s Metamorphoses in a one-woman show that explores the role of women in our post #MeToo era.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/16/2021 - 11:35am by .

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

A virtual symposium hosted by the Gallatin School of Individualize Study

Ancient queens established a powerful public presence through visual and material culture, and their legacies continue to shape and impact the ways we express ideas about race, gender, and identity.

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT is an interdisciplinary, virtual symposium hosted by NYU Gallatin on September 23-24, 2021. This symposium integrates scholarly and creative knowledge production from different perspectives that broaden the stakes and widen the impact of historical work. The symposium will model collaborative, critical, and public approaches to history and art by including the expertise of students, artists, performers, and educators beyond the university alongside the work of scholars and curators. Spanning two days, the symposium comprises seven panel discussions, five keynote talks, one performance, and an interactive website featuring public engagement, student work, and more.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:03pm by Erik Shell.

Multiple Explanations in the Ancient Greek and Roman World

Virtual seminar series, 2021-2022

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

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Experiencing Space: Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages VIII

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