CFP: International Congress on Medieval Studies 2019

54th International Congress on Medieval Studies 2019
Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 9-12, 2019 
 
Bridging the Gap: Classicists and Medievalists in Continuous Dialogue
sponsored by the Classical Association for the Midwest and South. Organizer: Anise K. Strong

We are calling for papers that address ways in which medieval society, texts, and material culture perpetuate and adapt earlier traditions and practices from the ancient world. While papers concerning the reception of literary texts are welcome, we are particularly interested in papers that seek to make connections between ancient and medieval religious practices, local customs and traditions, artistic styles or types of media, persistent urban centers, enduring clans or families, social attitudes towards oppressed groups or minorities, or deliberate political and social echoes of earlier classical forms of government. We define “ancient” and “medieval” broadly in this context. Papers about the influence of Zoroastrianism on medieval writings about magic would be as enthusiastically greeted as papers about the use of ancient Greek political terms to describe Scandinavian Things. 

Our goal is to feature a mixed and widely diverse group of speakers, including both classicists and medievalists (and of course late antique and early medieval specialists), who can each contribute their scholarship and expertise to a larger dialogue. We don’t always know what questions we should be asking each other, let alone what the answers might be. This panel seeks to help reinvigorate that discussion and further contact between CAMWS and ICMS, especially at a time when it seems wise for all pre-modernists to hang – and hang out – together.

Please follow the standard ICMS one-page, 250-300 word abstract format and attach the ICMS Participant Information form, as detailed here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED

The APA Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) solicits applications from APA members interested in serving as local scholars for Aquila Theatre’s Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives: Poetry-Drama-Dialogue program, an important new nationwide partnership between libraries and the theatre supported by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The program will have an additional focus on cross-cultural impact relating to the African-American, Asian-American and Latino experience and a special emphasis on veterans and their families and will be guided by consultants specializing in these areas. Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives will travel to 100 library and arts center locations nationwide.  Program details are available on the project web site.

Scholars are particularly needed who are within the vicinity of or able to travel to the following areas:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/07/2011 - 7:20pm by Adam Blistein.

The following members were chosen in the elections held this Summer. They take office on January 8, 2012, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/05/2011 - 1:59pm by Adam Blistein.

The American Office (AO), the first of the international offices of L'Année philologique, was established in 1965 at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, when the volume of material, especially the English-language publications, began to exceed the capabilities of the Paris office.  Lisa Carson became Assistant Director and Principal Bibliographer in 1988, and assumed the Directorship in 1992. The AO moved to the University of Cincinnati in 2002, where it gained Dr. Shirley Werner as Assistant Director. In 2010 the AO moved to Duke University.

L'Année philologique on the Internet (APh Online) now covers 84 years of classical bibliography with volumes 1 (1924-1926) to 80 (2009).  Volume 80 was posted in late August, and 2,200 records from volume 81 (2010) have been online since the middle of June.  Additional records from volume 81 will be posted at the end of this year. 

Please note these new features of APh Online:

· It is now possible to create a search history alert. The alert automatically searches the latest update to the database, and then sends you an e-mail.  See the online user guide to learn how to register for this feature. 

· You can also subscribe to a RSS feed that will list all new records.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/05/2011 - 1:41pm by Adam Blistein.

The website for L'année philologique is now Z39.50 compliant, which means that users can search and download references from the site directly through bibliographic reference software such as EndNote. Click here to download a file that will enable EndNote to search and download information from APh online.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Wed, 10/05/2011 - 12:49pm by .

In response to the campaign to save Classics at Royal Holloway, and to the proposals put forward by the Department, the College has made some revisions to its proposals for the future of Classics. In particular the BA Classics is to be retained and the importance of advanced teaching in classical languages has been explicitly recognised. A reduction in staff numbers is still proposed, but it would be a loss of 4 posts rather than 6. We would be allowed to admit a total of 50 undergraduates per year for our classical degree programmes. The merger with History is still proposed but the suggestion now is that there would be a 'School of History and Classics' with a 'subject leader' for Classics. The proposal to move the Philosophy staff, including the Ancient Philosophy post, to the Department of Politics and International Relations has not been changed, nor has the proposal to move our Research Professor entirely to the Department of English.

Discussions within the College continue, and we hope for further progress. We are very pleased that we can continue to welcome applications through UCAS for 2012 for ALL our current degree programmes.

Prof. Anne Sheppard
Head of Classics and Philosophy Department
Royal Holloway
University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

tel: +44 (0)1784 443204

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 10/03/2011 - 2:33pm by Information Architect.

"When Ted Pappas returned to Greece last summer he took 'Electra' with him. 'I studied it in Greek under an olive tree on my property,' says Pappas, who is directing the Pittsburgh Public Theater production of 'Electra' that begins performances Thursday at the O'Reilly Theater, Downtown." Read more at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/02/2011 - 2:14pm by Information Architect.

Helen Hansen, a Plan II and public relations freshman at the University of Texas-Austin, wrote an impassioned defense of the Classics Department in her column in The Daily Texan this week.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/02/2011 - 2:06pm by Information Architect.

The deadline has been extended to nominate primary and secondary school Classics teachers for the Awards for Excellence in Teaching at the Precollegiate Level that we present jointly with the American Classical League.  October 11, 2011 is the new deadline for receipt of nomination materials in the APA Office.  Thanks to a gift to the APA's Campaign for Classics by Daniel and Joanna Rose, these awards carry a larger honorarium and include a stipend for the awardee's school to use for the purchase of educational materials.  Full details are available on the APA web site.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/26/2011 - 5:34pm by Adam Blistein.

A new programme to revive Latin and Greek in our schools

Peter Jones writes in Spectator.co.uk:

Some 15 years ago, at the behest of the then editor Charles Moore, I wrote a jovial 20-week QED: Learn Latin column for the Daily Telegraph. It attracted a huge following, and I still have four large box-files full of letters from users. The majority of them expressed one of three sentiments: ‘I learned Latin at school x years ago, loved it and am delighted to renew my acquaintance’; ‘I learned Latin at school, hated it, but now realise what I have missed’; and ‘I never learned Latin at school and have always regretted it’.

These responses have stayed with me ever since, but they prompt a question: anecdotal evidence about the value people place on Latin is all very well, but would it be possible to produce something a little more objective? Can we demonstrate unconditionally that, as Gilbert Murray argued to the Classical Association in 1954, our pearls are real?

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 09/25/2011 - 7:45pm by Information Architect.

From The Daily Texan's letters to the editor:

“Greek studies” is not about to be eliminated either as a field of study or as a major here, as the story titled “Greek studies to be eliminated from UT majors,” which ran in The Daily Texan on Thursday, suggests. The classics department continues to offer a wide range of courses on the languages and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome (classical studies), and UT students will continue to have multiple options for pursuing degrees that include advanced work in the language and culture of ancient Greece.

Yes, the Higher Education Coordinating Board has directed UT to eliminate one of our majors: the bachelor’s in Greek. But students still have four other degree options that require advanced work in ancient Greek language and culture: classics, classical archaeology, ancient history and classical civilization and Latin. The classics major requires advanced work in both Greek and Latin language. The classical archaeology and ancient history majors require advanced work in classical culture and also in either Greek or Latin. Even the bachelor’s in Latin requires advanced work in either Greek or classical culture.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sat, 09/24/2011 - 7:56pm by Information Architect.

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