CFP: Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

(Updated January 25, 2019; sent by Dimos Spatharas)

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference

Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

Dear colleagues,

We are delighted to announce the Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions III Conference on Memory and Emotions in Antiquity. The event will take place on 6-8 December 2019 at Rethymno, Crete.

We are now inviting proposals for papers of 25 minutes. Submissions should include titled abstracts (max 350 words) and a short bio (max 50 words). Please submit your proposals jointly to George Kazantzidis (gkazantzidis@upatras.gr) and Dimos Spatharas (spatharasd@gmail.com) no later than 23 February 2019.

Revised versions of papers presented at the Ancient Emotions conferences are considered for publication in the series Trends in Classics-Ancient Emotions (De Gruyter) edited by the organizers.

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/502932

http://philology.upatras.gr/medical-understandings-emotions-antiquity/

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote speaker: Angelos Chaniotis (IAS, Princeton)

Jennifer Devereaux  (U. of South California/U. of Exeter)

Elias Economou (U. of Crete)

Nick Fisher (U. of Cardiff)

Philip Hardie (U. of Cambridge)

George Kazantzidis (U. of Patras)

Marc Mastrangelo (Dickinson College)

Damien Nelis (U. of Geneva)

Maria Michela Sassi (U. of Pisa)

William Short (U. of Exeter)

Dimos Spatharas (U. of Crete)

Description  

Researchers in the fields of neuroscience and psychology and philosophers explore the relationship between memory and emotions. Despite the salience of memory in ancient lay and scientific understandings of emotions, the topic remains under-explored. E.g. as early as Hesiod’s Theogony, poetry, the domain of Mnemosyne’s daughters, is granted with the power to offer forgetfulness of cares, even as they resist lethe. The ‘I’ of a modern Greek folk song, a young man who is about to migrate is given the following lines: ‘when I forget, I’m happy, (but) when I remember, I’m sorrowful’. Memory is pivotal to emotions because it commonly shapes the appraisals which define their phenomenology.       

On a cognitive level, memories of emotive experiences seem to be more vivid than ‘neuter’ memories. E.g. compare one’s memories of the day that one’s child/children was/were born to, say, the last faculty meeting that she attended. Researchers debate over the accuracy of emotion-laden memories and the questions that they raise are particularly akin to ancient systematic approaches to memory or to memory’s interfaces with phantasia and the ways in which we respond emotionally to the mental images which these akin cognitive faculties yield. In this conference, we want to ask questions about both ancient modes of understanding the interfaces between memory (qua a cognitive capacity) and emotions and the implications of memories, i.e. recalled events, for the literature and the cultures that attract our attention.

Memory is intrinsic to our emotional experience because emotions typically have a narrative background which determines their intentionality. My grief for the death of a friend or a relative brings to my mind past experiences which I shared with her. Memory, thus, contributes significantly to my sense that my life will no longer be the same without her. Furthermore, recent discussions emphasize the importance of autobiographical memory for readers’ emotive responses to literature. The very first pages of Proust’s narrative, indeed a trivial but telling example, not only indicate the interconnections between autobiographical memories and the acts of writing and reading, but also indicate the extent to which our senses (or more generally our embodied experience) are related to memories that activate our present emotional experiences. Autobiographical and sensory memories are therefore functional to our emotional engagement with narratives. Furthermore, discursive or artistic representations of collective memories determine the construction of traditions and invite audiences or spectators to respond emotionally to them. Correlatively, memories are also central to emotionally loaded experiences of communal life: emotional responses to ritual practices, political deliberation, and dramatic performances are shaped by participants’ shared memories, while their emotional qualities grant them with lasting memorability.

We invite papers on subjects related to, but not exclusively about:

  • Ancient and modern cognitive approaches to memory and emotions
  • Memory, phantasia, and emotions
  • Collective memories and emotions
  • Monuments, memories, and emotions
  • Autobiographical memory, emotions, and audiences’/readers’ responses to literature
  • Memory and consolation
  • Ancient poetics/rhetoric, memory, and emotions
  • Memory and ‘pathological’ emotions
  • Conceptual/embodied metaphors for memory and emotions
  • Memory, the senses, and emotions
  • Trauma and emotions
  • Emotions and the deployment of civic/collective memory
  • Rituals, memory, and emotions

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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NEH Logo

January, 2020

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Nathanael Stein (Florida State University) - "Causation and Explanation in Aristotle"
  • Marcus Folch (Columbia University) - "A Cultural History of Incarceration and the Prison in Greece and Rome"
  • Alexander Jones (New York University) - "Reconstructing the Daily Ancient Babylonian Chronology in Synchronization with the Proleptic Julian Calendar"

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 01/17/2020 - 10:45am by Erik Shell.

(The website for Keely Lake's In Memoriam can be found here)

Keely K. Lake, 48, passed away on January 15, 2020, at the age of 48.  

She was the daughter of James and Dorothy (Burcham) Lake, born on December 8, 1971.  She had recently moved back to Hot Springs to care for her father.

Keely graduated from Hot Springs High school in 1990, the University of South Dakota with a BA in Classics in 1994 and the University of Iowa with a PhD in Classics in 2001.

She was a visiting guest professor at Gettysburg College in 2001 and Professor of Classical Greek and Latin at Wayland Academy from 2002 until 2018.

She was teaching online courses for Montclair State, Wayne State University and One Schoolhouse.

She was an active member of the Vergilian Society, several Classic related boards and organizations and was a reader/table leader for standardized AP exams in Latin.

Keely was an avid gardener, enjoyed cooking, reading, traveling, and collecting books.  She also traveled extensively which was a passion of hers. 

She is survived by her father, James Lake; and her precious cats, Penelope and Gemini.  She is preceded in death by her mother.

Visitation services will be held 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m., Thursday, January 23, 2020, at Chamberlain McColley’s Funeral Home in Hot Springs, SD.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 01/17/2020 - 9:53am by Erik Shell.

CFP: "Transitions of Power" for SAGE Business Cases

The Ancient Leadership collection within SAGE Business Cases explores leadership in Classical history, mythology, philosophy, and material culture in a way that is engaging and useful for business students and instructors at the undergraduate and graduate level. This project is a chance for those of us who work in the ancient world to experiment with a very mainstream method of leadership pedagogy and hopefully to teach a wider audience about the central importance of the humanities for leadership study and training. We expect that each of the case studies will illustrate the ways in which the humanities makes important–if not unique–contributions to the study of leadership and the training of leaders:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/16/2020 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

The Theory and Practice of Cosmic Ascent: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Approaches

Trinity College, Dublin
19-20 June, 2020

Conference Sponsors: Trinity College Department of Classics, and The Centre for the Study of the Platonic Tradition, Trinity College, Dublin

Conference Organisers: Professor John Dillon (Emeritus, Trinity College, Dublin) and Nicholas Banner (Trinity College, Dublin) 

Date:  19-20 June, 2020
Submission Deadline:  13 March, 2020
Confirmation Date:  01 April, 2020

One of the most striking tropes in the history of western thought is the account of cosmic ascent; we find narratives of humans ascending to the stars and beyond in a vast array of sources from among the earliest written accounts of western literature, through antiquity, and up to (at least) the High Middle Ages. From the Hellenistic period onward, Mediterranean religions and philosophies (understood broadly) looked increasingly to a model of human ascent as a primary locus for spiritual achievement; however, the ways in which such ascent was conceptualized vary enormously from tradition to tradition (we might compare e.g. Jewish apocalyptic texts with the ascent-accounts of Platonist philosophers, or Hermetic with Sethian ascent-accounts), and even from thinker to thinker (we might contrast e.g. Plutarch with Plotinus or St Paul with Clement of Alexandria). 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/14/2020 - 9:31am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers
Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2020
PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity
Szeged, Hungary, September 2–4, 2020

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2020, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is English. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by discussion. It is not possible to present via Skype.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/14/2020 - 9:26am by Erik Shell.

Our second interview in the Women in Classics series is with Shelley Haley, Edward North Chair of Classics and Professor of Africana Studies at Hamilton College. This is the second of a two-part interview with Prof. Haley, which picks up at the point when she decided to apply to graduate school to study Classics.

CC: How did you decide to apply to graduate school?  

This was a very turbulent time in American history. I was fed up with the United States of America, absolutely fed up. I remember the conversations we used to have about the women’s movement. This was back in the dark ages. There were three or four white women on my floor in college having a deep discussion, wringing their hands and saying, “But how, how, how are we going to have a family and a career? How?” In my head I was just frustrated. My mother, my grandmother, her mother before her, all of them always had to work, and always had family. It can be done. I think that was my first introduction to black feminism, and to the line that divides it from white feminism. I had had enough.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 01/13/2020 - 6:24am by Claire Catenaccio.

Our second interview in the Women in Classics series is with Shelley Haley, Edward North Chair of Classics and Professor of Africana Studies at Hamilton College. She was born in upstate New York and earned her B.A. from Syracuse University in 1972. She received her M.A. in 1975 and her Ph.D. in 1977, both from the University of Michigan. An expert on the figure of Cleopatra, Dr. Haley has discussed the subject on both the BBC and the Learning Channel. Her publications include Fanny Jackson Coppin’s Reminiscences of School Life, and Hints on Teaching (1995) and numerous articles on the role of women in the ancient world and on race in the discipline of Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 4:47pm by Claire Catenaccio.
First USA Cicero Awayday
 
Saturday April 18, 2020, 8am-5.45pm
University of Virginia
Gibson Room, First floor Cocke Hall

8:00 am

Light breakfast and coffee in Gibson Room

8:50 - 9:00 am

Welcome and introduction

First session (Chair TBD)

9:00 - 9:45 am

Ben Watson (University of Oklahoma): "A New Commentary on Cicero’s Divinatio in Caecilium"

9:45 - 10:30 am

Gina White (University of Kansas): "Emulation and Moral Development in the De Officiis"

10:30-10:45 am

Coffee

Second session (Chair TBD)

10:45 - 11:30 am

Amanda Wilcox (Williams College): "Cicero on Paternal Authority and the Domus"

11:30 - 12:15 pm

Peter White (University of Chicago): "The Mirage of the Tirocinium Fori"

12:15-1:30 pm

Lunch (in Gibson Room)

Third session (Chair TBD)

1:30 - 2:15 pm

Francesca Martelli (UCLA): "Historical Irony in the Ordination of Cicero Ad familiares 10-12"

2:15 - 3:00 pm

Spencer Cole (University of Minnesota): "Cicero and Populism, Then and Now"

3:00 - 3:45 pm

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 9:32am by Erik Shell.

“Whose Heritage is it Anyway?”: Local Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Age of UNESCO

UT Antiquities Action 2020 Annual Symposium
Keynote speaker: Yvonne Therese Holden, Director of Operations, Whitney Plantation

UT Antiquities Action invites the submission of abstracts for its 5th annual symposium, to be held on Saturday, the 4th of April, 2020 at the University of Texas at Austin. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 9:23am by Erik Shell.

Homer in Sicily: An Academic Conference and Tour of Ancient Sites

Exedra Mediterranean Center
Syracuse, Sicily, 12-15 January, 2021
With a post-conference tour of Greek Sicily, 16-18 January

Homeric Thrinacia – our Sicily – is the legendary home of the Cattle of the Sun, the Cyclops, the Laestrygonians, Aeolus, and close neighbor of Skylla and Charybdis. Samuel Butler, in the nineteenth century, memorably theorized that the Odyssey’s author was a young Sicilian woman, glimpsed in the figure of Nausicaa. Otherwise, surprisingly few scholars have explored Sicily’s association with the Homeric epics, the Odyssey in particular. The goal of this conference is to bring scholars from a variety of disciplines to Siracusa to discuss Homer’s epic vision and to visit the archaeological traces of the mythic places and beings of the Odyssey.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 9:00am by Erik Shell.

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In Memoriam
(The website for Keely Lake's In Memoriam can be found
Calls for Papers
CFP: "Transitions of Power" for SAGE Business Cases
Calls for Papers
The Theory and Practice of Cosmic Ascent: Comparative and Interdiscip

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