CFP: Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

(Updated January 25, 2019; sent by Dimos Spatharas)

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference

Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

Dear colleagues,

We are delighted to announce the Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions III Conference on Memory and Emotions in Antiquity. The event will take place on 6-8 December 2019 at Rethymno, Crete.

We are now inviting proposals for papers of 25 minutes. Submissions should include titled abstracts (max 350 words) and a short bio (max 50 words). Please submit your proposals jointly to George Kazantzidis (gkazantzidis@upatras.gr) and Dimos Spatharas (spatharasd@gmail.com) no later than 23 February 2019.

Revised versions of papers presented at the Ancient Emotions conferences are considered for publication in the series Trends in Classics-Ancient Emotions (De Gruyter) edited by the organizers.

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/502932

http://philology.upatras.gr/medical-understandings-emotions-antiquity/

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote speaker: Angelos Chaniotis (IAS, Princeton)

Jennifer Devereaux  (U. of South California/U. of Exeter)

Elias Economou (U. of Crete)

Nick Fisher (U. of Cardiff)

Philip Hardie (U. of Cambridge)

George Kazantzidis (U. of Patras)

Marc Mastrangelo (Dickinson College)

Damien Nelis (U. of Geneva)

Maria Michela Sassi (U. of Pisa)

William Short (U. of Exeter)

Dimos Spatharas (U. of Crete)

Description  

Researchers in the fields of neuroscience and psychology and philosophers explore the relationship between memory and emotions. Despite the salience of memory in ancient lay and scientific understandings of emotions, the topic remains under-explored. E.g. as early as Hesiod’s Theogony, poetry, the domain of Mnemosyne’s daughters, is granted with the power to offer forgetfulness of cares, even as they resist lethe. The ‘I’ of a modern Greek folk song, a young man who is about to migrate is given the following lines: ‘when I forget, I’m happy, (but) when I remember, I’m sorrowful’. Memory is pivotal to emotions because it commonly shapes the appraisals which define their phenomenology.       

On a cognitive level, memories of emotive experiences seem to be more vivid than ‘neuter’ memories. E.g. compare one’s memories of the day that one’s child/children was/were born to, say, the last faculty meeting that she attended. Researchers debate over the accuracy of emotion-laden memories and the questions that they raise are particularly akin to ancient systematic approaches to memory or to memory’s interfaces with phantasia and the ways in which we respond emotionally to the mental images which these akin cognitive faculties yield. In this conference, we want to ask questions about both ancient modes of understanding the interfaces between memory (qua a cognitive capacity) and emotions and the implications of memories, i.e. recalled events, for the literature and the cultures that attract our attention.

Memory is intrinsic to our emotional experience because emotions typically have a narrative background which determines their intentionality. My grief for the death of a friend or a relative brings to my mind past experiences which I shared with her. Memory, thus, contributes significantly to my sense that my life will no longer be the same without her. Furthermore, recent discussions emphasize the importance of autobiographical memory for readers’ emotive responses to literature. The very first pages of Proust’s narrative, indeed a trivial but telling example, not only indicate the interconnections between autobiographical memories and the acts of writing and reading, but also indicate the extent to which our senses (or more generally our embodied experience) are related to memories that activate our present emotional experiences. Autobiographical and sensory memories are therefore functional to our emotional engagement with narratives. Furthermore, discursive or artistic representations of collective memories determine the construction of traditions and invite audiences or spectators to respond emotionally to them. Correlatively, memories are also central to emotionally loaded experiences of communal life: emotional responses to ritual practices, political deliberation, and dramatic performances are shaped by participants’ shared memories, while their emotional qualities grant them with lasting memorability.

We invite papers on subjects related to, but not exclusively about:

  • Ancient and modern cognitive approaches to memory and emotions
  • Memory, phantasia, and emotions
  • Collective memories and emotions
  • Monuments, memories, and emotions
  • Autobiographical memory, emotions, and audiences’/readers’ responses to literature
  • Memory and consolation
  • Ancient poetics/rhetoric, memory, and emotions
  • Memory and ‘pathological’ emotions
  • Conceptual/embodied metaphors for memory and emotions
  • Memory, the senses, and emotions
  • Trauma and emotions
  • Emotions and the deployment of civic/collective memory
  • Rituals, memory, and emotions

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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(publishing on behalf of Thea Sommerschield, a Marie Curie fellow at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and Fellow at Harvard’s CHS)

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Res Difficiles: A Conference on Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity in Classics 

When: May 20, 2022 , 9:00am - 4:00pm 

Where: Live-streamed via Zoom [Registration now open]

Classical Studies at Boston University and Classics, BU Center for the Humanities, Philosophy, & Religious Studies at the University of Mary Washington present Res Difficiles: A Conference On Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity In Classics. [Res Difficiles 3: Difficult Conversations in Classics].

Dr. Kelly Nguyen (Stanford University) will deliver the keynote address.

The event will be live-streamed via Zoom, and will be live-captioned. Participants/viewers may live-tweet the event on the hashtag #ResDiff3.

You can find more information about the speakers and sessions here: https://resdifficiles.com/

You can register here

Any questions can be directed to the co-organizers: Hannah Čulík-Baird and Joseph Romero.

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Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future - Celebrating the Centennial of Excavations at Dura-Europos

Sponsored by: Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA Program for the Study of Ancient and Premodern Cultures and Societies

Dates : March 31, 2022 - April 2, 2022

Where: Hybrid/Virtual [livestream]

Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA program is pleased to share news of its upcoming hybrid conference: Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future. This three-day event (March 31-April 2, 2022) is arranged to celebrate the centennial of excavations on-site at Dura-Europos (Syria). Papers and discussion will explore the town’s regional and long-distance ties in antiquity, 21st-century geopolitical entanglements, and avenues for future research. Registration is free, and online attendance is open to all. 

For information about the papers and presenters, and to register, please see: 

https://campuspress.yale.edu/duraeuropos2022/

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/08/2022 - 11:55am by .

CAAS ARC Workshop: Diversity Policies are for Everyone

When: Saturday, March 19, 2022 - 11:00AM EDT

Where: Virtual (via Zoom)

The Antiracism Committee (ARC) of The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) is organizing another workshop on diversity policies. Through a series of case studies, this workshop will explore ways to create and improve on diversity policies so that they can be more helpful to BIPOC students and scholars. We’ll be meeting on Saturday, March 19, 2022 at 11am EDT via Zoom. This workshop is free and open to anyone who registers.

If you’d like to register, you can fill out this form:  https://forms.gle/C5KMYK7nB3FQRVXr8

If you have any questions about the workshop, please email David Wright: djwrig85@gmail.com. See also attached flyer and share widely! Hope to see you there!

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Call for Proposals: CAAS 2022 Annual Meeting

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States

Dates: October 6-8, 2022

Venue: HOTEL DU PONT, Wilmington, DE

Deadline for all proposals (individual papers, panels, workshops): (extended) Monday, March 28, 2022

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The Classics Program at Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), advertises its graduate programs in Latin education. These programs combine courses and mentoring in the vibrant environs of New York City. They aim to foster the ability to make Latin compelling to a diverse population of middle and high school students. Both programs lead to certification in New York State. Applications are accepted in both the Fall and the Spring. The deadline for applications to start in Fall 2022 is March 15th, 2022, but consideration may be made for later applications. 

  1. MA in Adolescent Education, Grades 7-12 – Latin

A 49 to 50-credit course sequence in Latin, Classics, and Education that prepares students to teach Latin in grades 7-12. This program is run jointly by the Classics Program in the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education.

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 03/04/2022 - 4:49pm by .

When you are standing at the edge of the Pontic steppe, where the Bug-Dnieper estuary melts into the Black Sea, there are three islands on the horizon. It can be difficult to see in the haze of late summer, which is when I was there last with two friends, Sam Holzman and Phil Katz.

Foremost is Berezan, once connected to the adjacent mainland. Long and flat-topped like a container ship, the largest of the handful of islands to rise from the Black Sea. It was settled by Ionians in the sixth century BCE, and has been all-but-continuously excavated since 1894.

A second island is artificial: across from the mainland town of Ochakiv lies the fortress isle of Pervomaisky. The Ottomans used the citadel at Ochakiv to control access to the river until it fell to John Paul Jones in service of the Empress Catherine in 1788. Pervomaisky was built up from a sandbar and fortified by Russia in the late nineteenth century. Both permanently blocked off the Dnieper as an invasion or slaving route to the forest steppe.

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International Conferences of Novelty in Classics

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02-03 September 2022 (virtual via MS Teams)

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Between 6pm GMT on 31 May 2022 and the following evening, 1 June 2022, the Herodotus Helpline will be hosting the Herodotus Marathon. This is a non-stop, multilingual reading of Herodotus’ Histories. We are calling it the Marathon because we anticipate that it will take a little over 26 hours. Non-stop. Different readers will read their sections of the Histories via zoom, but it will be broadcast live (and recorded for posterity) on youtube. Readers will read in their native languages (or in ancient Greek, if they prefer).

To reflect Herodotus’ huge reach, we are looking for readers from the widest possible range of backgrounds (and the widest possible range of native tongues). Readers will include: scholars and students of Herodotus, celebrities with an interest or background in antiquity, or members of the general public with an interest in the ancient world - all are welcome!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 8:04am by .

Interdisciplinary Humanities 

Fall/Winter 2022 issue: Myth and Art

Deadline for Submissions: March 31, 2022

Guest Editors: Edmund Cueva and Anna Tahinci

[Journal published by parent organization - HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) at UTEP (University of Texas at El Paso)]

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 7:41am by .

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