CFP: The Moon in Human Imagination

"Fly me to the moon" The moon in human imagination
University of Genova (Italy) December 12th-13th 2019

From October 2018 through December 2022, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Program that landed a dozen Americans on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

All kind of events, activities, exhibitions, seminars dedicated to celebrating the first moon landing are understandably spreading everywhere and we want to join the celebrations in our own way.

The moon has always been a source of mystery and enchantment to people of all times and has lit up our imagination for centuries: for writers and poets, the moon has been at one moment a beneficent and comforting presence offering refuge in nocturnal and idyllic landscapes, at the next a silent confidante to secret loves, but also a witness of misdeeds, crimes and mysterious adventures, as well as a power capable of generating werewolves and creatures of the night. From ancient times to modern Western art and literature, the Moon is a recurring subject of poetry and all sorts of artistic representations, an inspiration for mythologies and mysticism, the object of scientific inquiries and a crucial destination for science-­‐‑fiction fantasies. We might say that the attraction our satellite exerts on literature is at least as powerful as its pull on the tides.

The importance of the Moon as a source for the visual arts and literature in all times has long been recognized and, although the theme has been explored before, its influence is inexhaustible.

An international conference is an excellent opportunity for researchers in many different fields to keep exploring our various images of the Moon and to exchange ideas and share experiences and research methodologies.

The University of Genova, and in particular its Departments of Classics and Italian studies (DAFIST and DIRAAS), invites submissions of articles on the subject of the Moon to be presented at an international conference to be held in Genova on 12-­‐‑13 December 2019.

The deadline for submission is July 20th 20:17 UTC (date and time when the lunar module Eagle landed on the lunar surface).

Using the Moon as a source of inspiration, we invite scholars of Classical Studies, Medieval and Renaissance culture, Modern and Contemporary Literature, History and Philosophy, Music and Musicology, Cinema and Media Studies, to explore and discuss the many different ways that writers, poets, historians, artists, film makers have tried to capture the image of our satellite.

We welcome submissions from scholars at all levels of career, but especially encourage doctoral and advanced students.

Please send a brief curriculum vitae, and a proposal of approximately 500 words to lara.nicolini@unige.it, luca.beltrami@unige.it, lara.pagani@unige.it.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:

  • the Moon in mythology / lunar myths / the Moon and the Poets
  • the Moon in Ancient and Modern Novel and in Scientific literature
  • the Moon in Greek and Roman Literature
  • the Moon in Religion and History of religions
  • Magic of the Moon. The Moon in Magic
  • the Moon in Linguistic, Sociology etc. / Questioning the Grammar: Genre and Gender of the Moon
  • Science of the Moon / Knowledge and Science about the Moon (from Aristotle to Galileo to NASA) /. Animals and the Moon
  • Iconography of the Moon (from the ancient times to space-­‐‑age art) / Moon in Art History / Moon and Moonlight in the visual arts / Lunar landscapes / Visions of the night
  • the Moon in Science fiction, Cinema and media studies (from Verne to Hollywood)
  • Music by Moonlight: the Moon in the Music / Songs about the Moon

Submission guidelines

Authors from all over the world are invited to submit original and unpublished papers, which are not under review for any other conference or journal. All papers will be peer reviewed by the program committee and selected on the basis of their originality, significance, and methodological soundness.

Submitted abstracts can be written in Italian or English (the same goes for the papers).

The length of contributions must be between 4 and 8 pages (about 20/25-­‐‑minutes papers). Submission implies that the contributor is willing to attend the conference and present the paper.

The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference, open discussion and networking.

Key Dates

Submission deadline for abstracts: 20 July 2019

Author notification: 30 September 2019

Conference dates: 12-­‐‑13 December 2019

Conference venue

Genoa is one of the most beautiful Italian cities and a Mediterranean seaport. It embraces different cultures and traditions from the past, combined in a unique and original architecture. Its vast old town is an intricate maze of narrow alleys extending up to the seafront of the Old Harbour. The city center boasts Medieval buildings next to rich Renaissance noble palaces (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), museums and several churches hosting important art masterpieces, in a unique cohesion of past splendor and contemporary everyday life.

www.visitgenoa.it

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Multi-Society Statement on Proposed Cuts at the University of Tulsa

The undersigned associations urge the University of Tulsa to reconsider and rescind its recent recommendations calling for the elimination of undergraduate majors in philosophy, religion, theater, musical theater, music, languages, law, and of several graduate and doctoral programs, including those in anthropology, fine arts, history, and women’s and gender studies and to eliminate undergraduate minors in ancient languages and classical studies.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Mon, 04/29/2019 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, recently launched by the SCS, supports projects that seek to introduce and engage communities all over the US with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. During the first round of applications, the SCS funded 13 projects, ranging from performances and a cinema series to educational programs and inter-institutional collaborations. In this blog post, we aim to highlight three programs in which Classicists are sharing the joy of studying Greece and Rome with their communities..

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 9:12pm by Mallory Monaco Caterine.
We would like to alert classicists to a recently-identified website (classicalbulletin.org) that presents itself as that of The Classical Bulletin (a now-defunct periodical) and offers open-access publication for a fee. The site fraudulently uses logos and trademarks, and the names of institutions and individuals, including the names of alleged editors.  Institutions named include The Canadian Classical Bulletin, two Xavier Universities, the Institute of Classical Studies in London, and Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. None of the institutions or persons mentioned have any connection to the website.  Thanks to @rogueclassicist for uncovering the details.
 
The official site of the Canadian Classical Bulletin is: http://www.cac-scec.website/canadian-classical-bulletin-ccb/
 
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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 12:38pm by Erik Shell.

12th Annnual West Coast Plato Workshop

San Diego State University, 24-26 May

Friday (May 24)

3-4:30pm: Drinks and Refreshments

5-6:30pm: Keynote Public Lecture: Deborah Modrak (University of Rochester)

7-9pm: Dinner for Speakers, Commentators, and Chairs


Saturday (May 25)

9-9:30am: Coffee and Refreshments

9:30-10:45: Invited Speaker: Adam Beresford (University of Massachusetts at Boston)

Commentator: Jan Szaif (University of California at Davis)

11-12:10pm: Oksana Maksymchuk (University of Arkansas): An Anthropological Defense of the Measure Doctrine in the Protagoras

Commentator: Grant Dowling (Stanford University)

12:15-1:30pm: Lunch and Business Meeting

1:45-2:55: Marta Jimenez (Emory University): Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Knowledge

Commentator: Ryan Drake (Fairfield University)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 9:35am by Erik Shell.

(Republished from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

In a career that lasted over 70 years, Jerry Clack wore many different hats.

From a youthful stint at the Swedish Legation in Washington and four years with UNESCO to public relations and accounting positions with AAA, Coca-Cola and the American Heart Association, he went on to assume directorship of Allegheny County’s chapter of The March of Dimes in 1953. His 15-year tenure with March of Dimes saw the development of two anti-polio vaccines, that of Jonas Salk at University of Pittsburgh and the oral vaccine of Albert Sabin.

Mr. Clack died Monday at Shadyside Hospital due to heart failure.

The son of Mildred Taylor Van Dyke of Pittsburgh and Christopher Thrower Clack of Boydton, Virginia, Mr. Clack was born in New York City on July 22, 1926. Because his father was a foreign representative of the Pittsburgh-based Blaw-Knox Company, he spent his early years in Europe, mostly in London and Dusseldorf. After his father’s death, he returned with his mother to Pittsburgh, attending the Fulton School and Peabody High School.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 8:43am by Erik Shell.

by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Christopher B. Polt

In this post, Profs. Gellar-Goad and Polt clarify their position in the debate over holding the annual CAMWS meeting at BYU for the 2023 annual meeting and why they view BYU as an unsafe conference site for LGTBQ+ classicists.

On Saturday, April 20, the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS) rescinded its earlier decision to hold part of its annual meeting on the campus of Brigham Young University (BYU) during its 2023 conference in Provo, Utah.

CAMWS leadership had selected Brigham Young University (BYU) to host its 2023 annual meeting — despite the fact that serious concerns about the safety and inclusion of its LGBTQ+ members at such a conference site were voiced before and after that decision was made — and dismissed repeated requests for compromise that would safeguard LGBTQ+ colleagues. Over the last 18 months we tried to work with, and within the structure of, CAMWS to address this issue quietly and amicably. We did so in an attempt to save everyone a great deal of anguish and to avoid unnecessary negative attention for the Classicists at BYU. Ultimately, however, we felt compelled to call on CAMWS publicly to change course, and CAMWS leadership did so only in the face of significant public pressure by Classicists across the world.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 8:13am by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.
Eta Sigma Phi students, Callie Todhunter, Noah Andrys, and Myles Young, staff the Homerathon booth at the University of Iowa

For a number of years, our local Eta Sigma Phi chapter has been organizing public readings of the sorts of things classicists cut their teeth on – or at least feel like we do: Homer’s epics, Vergil, Ovid. These have always been a wonderful experience for our department – everyone involved loves the opportunity to read and hear these works as they were meant. We decided that this year we wanted to reach a different and larger audience than before, inspired by the outreach of, among others, Bob Cargill and the University of Nebraska's Homerathon tradition (which the SCS Blog covered last year). Literature and art flourish in Iowa City, a UNESCO City of Literature, which is also the home of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and many artists. Why not ask them, as well as people in our community, to join us? One of our guiding principles was that Homer belongs to everyone, not just classicists.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/18/2019 - 10:56pm by .

"Writing Ancient and Medieval Same-Sex Desire: Goals, Methods, Challenges"
June 30-July 2, 2020
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/17/2019 - 9:03am by Erik Shell.

Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts

King's College London, 30-31 May 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Prof Dimitri Gutas, Yale University

Registration is now open for the postgraduate conference "Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts." The programme is included below and you can read more about our aims and about the line up here: https://hcommons.org/app/uploads/sites/1001234/2019/04/RWL-booklet.pdf

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/16/2019 - 9:34am by Erik Shell.

Please note that the deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

You can submit your abstract via our online Program Submission System  

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/15/2019 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

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