CFP: Rome and Iberia - Diversity of Relations from Antiquity to Modernity

The Department of Spanish Studies and the Department of Classical Philology of the University in Lodz would like to invite you to the second interdisciplinary academic conference:

Rome and Iberia.
Diversity of Relations from Antiquity to Modernity.

April 25-26, 2019

While the Roman conquest was not the beginning of the Iberian Peninsula history, Roman presence in the region profoundly affected the lives of its inhabitants. Those relations left a permanent mark on the Peninsula and the vestiges of Ancient Roman culture still abound not only there, but also in other countries which came under Iberian influence. This issue is still avidly researched and debated by scholars of different fields.

The Second Interdisciplinary Conference is an opportunity for Polish and international speakers, considering and analyzing the issue from a variety of perspectives, to exchange research experience. We anticipate speeches on such interesting topics as the correlations between Latin and Romance languages, for instance Spanish and Portuguese. Also expected to attend are scholars who will address the issue of, for example, the image of the Peninsula in the Latin literature of the Roman and subsequent periods, as well as the depiction of Ancient Rome as a source of inspiration in Spanish and Portuguese writings. We also extend a warm welcome to historians, art scholars and archeologists, as the remnants of the joint heritage of Rome and Iberia are to be found both in literature and in material culture.

We hope that our discussions will give rise to new and interesting research topics to be studied as joint projects.

We would like to invite literary scholars, linguists, culture scholars, historians, art historians, archaeologists and other researchers interested in the subject to take part in our interdisciplinary conference.

Please, send papers concerning the following topics related to the relationships between the inhabitants of the ancient Rome and the Iberian Peninsula:

  1. The history of the Roman conquest of the Peninsula.
  2. Political, economic and commercial relations in the ancient times.
  3. Mutual linguistic influences.
  4. Mutual literary influences and inspirations – such as genres, poetry, topics, topoi and myths.
  5. Reception of Roman literature on the Iberian Peninsula and in other Spanish-speaking countries – imitation, continuation and modification of literary patterns.
  6. Inspirations in art.
  7. Material culture remains from the Roman times on the Peninsula’s territory.
  8. Population migrations in the ancient times and subsequent eras.
  9. Transport and tourism.
  10. Mutual relations in the field of religion.
  11. Everyday customs of Romans and their influence on the life of the inhabitants of the Peninsula.
  12. Reception and validity of ancient Rome’s traditions in the modern culture of the Iberian Peninsula and of other Spanish-speaking countries.

Languages of the conference: Polish, English, Spanish

Conference fee: 420 PLN / 100 Euro / 100 $  (the fee includes costs of participation, conference materials, coffee breaks, two lunches, a banquet and a monographic publication consisting of selected articles).

Suggestions of topics together with an abstract (up to 1500 characters) should be sent by e-mail until the 15th of February 2019 to the following organisers’ addresses:

Adriana Grzelak-Krzymianowska, PhD (Polish, English)

adriana.grzelak-krzymianowska@uni.lodz.pl

Maria Judyta Woźniak, PhD (Polish, Spanish)

m.j.wozniak@uni.lodz.pl

The applicants will be informed about their paper acceptance in the end of February. That is also when practical information will be provided.

Anticipated time of a speech duration: 20 minutes.

The Conference will be held in the Faculty of Humanities, University of Lodz, Poland, Pomorska 171/173 Łódź.

Scientific Committee

prof. zw. dr hab. Wiaczesław Nowikow (University of Łódź)

prof. zw. dr hab. Iwona Modrzewska-Pianetti (University of Warsaw)

prof. dr Tomás Jiménez Juliá (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela)

dr hab. prof. UŁ Zbigniew Danek (University of Łódź)

dr hab. prof. UŁ Agnieszka Kłosińska-Nachin (University of Łódź)

dr Gregor Pobežin (University of Primorska)

Organizing Commitee:

dr Maria Judyta Woźniak (Department of Spanish Studies UŁ )

dr Adriana Grzelak-Krzymianowska (Department of Classical Philology UŁ)

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Instructions for submission of proposals to the APA Program Committee for review at its meeting in April will be posted here at the beginning of February.  The deadline for receipt of these submissions will be no earlier than March 16, 2012.  Until these instructions are posted, consult the information provided last year, especially the program policies, the descriptions of materials required for the different types of submissions, and the information on eligibility.  (Note:  Persons submitting proposals to the Program Committee this year must be members in good standing for 2012.)  While the method of submission may be different this year, general policies and the materials required will be very similar and probably identical. 

At its April meeting the Program Committee will consider the following types of submissions

Proposals of Sessions for the 2013 Annual Meeting

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/24/2012 - 3:00pm by Adam Blistein.

The message below was sent to all APA members for whom we have a valid e-mail address on January 20, 2012.

---------------------

Dear Colleague:

Our joint annual meeting just completed in Philadelphia attracted over 3,000 registrants—one of our largest meetings ever.  Daniel Mendelsohn got us off to a wonderful start by movingly reminding us why we devote our lives to the study of classical antiquity.  Kathleen Coleman’s Presidential Panel entitled “Images for Classicists” showed us new ways to carry out our work, and new initiatives from the Program Committee improved both the presentations at sessions and the discussions they stimulated.  And to judge from the number of institutions conducting interviews through the Placement Service, even the job market (knock on wood) was improved over the last two years.  All these efforts produced an energy that carried over to the book display, the CAMP performance, and, of course, the receptions.  I look forward to working with you to maintain that energy during my Presidency.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:47pm by Adam Blistein.

Search for Editor of Transactions of the American Philological Association

Professor Katharina Volk has indicated her intention to complete her term as Editor at the 2014 Annual Meeting.  The Editor, who must be a member in good standing of the Association, is initially appointed for four years, with the possibility of extension for a maximum of two additional years.   The new editor's term officially begins in January 2014 and will cover volumes 144-147 and the years 2014-2017.  As Editor Designate, however, the new editor will begin to receive submissions in early 2013 and spend the summer and fall of that year preparing the 2014 issues for the press.  Professor Volk will complete the two issues for the year 2013.

The editor of TAPA has sole responsibility for editorial content, and must acknowledge submissions, select referees, and inform authors whether submissions have been accepted.  In addition, the editor must work closely with the journals division of Johns Hopkins University Press, which typesets, produces and distributes each issue.  A lively interest in the future of scholarly publishing in the digital age will be a welcome qualification.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:31pm by Adam Blistein.

"Latin is a bit like a zombie: dead but still clamoring to get into our brains. In one discipline, however, Latin just got a bit deader. For at least 400 years, botanists across the globe have relied on Latin as their lingua franca, but the ardor has cooled. Scientists say plants will keep their double-barreled Latin names, but they have decided to drop the requirement that new species be described in the classical language. Instead, they have agreed to allow botanists to use English (other languages need not apply). In their scientific papers, they can still describe a newly found species of plant — or algae or fungi — in Latin if they wish, but most probably won’t."

Read more online at The Washington Post.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:23pm by Information Architect.

"A university professorship which has been dormant for more than a decade is to be revived after a £2.4m bequest from the last person to hold the post. Professor Douglas Maurice MacDowell held Glasgow University's Chair of Greek between 1971 and 2001. After his death in 2010, aged 78, Prof MacDowell's will stated his portfolio of stocks and shares be used to re-establish the position. The new Chair of Greek is expected to be in place for September this year." Read more at the BBC online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 01/19/2012 - 9:54pm by Information Architect.

From the Truman State University Index:

"Despite its small numbers, the classics department remains alive even though their languages are ancient. There are 19 declared classics majors, five of whom will graduate this year, 27 minors and four full-time staff members, said Clifton Kreps, classical and modern language department chair. The Missouri Department of Higher Education reviewed all programs with fewer than 10 graduates a year during Fall 2010. Truman State thus was required to provide a written justification and answer a questionnaire regarding enrollment data for the small number of graduates in classics, along with art history, Russian, German, interdisciplinary studies and bachelors of music. The explanation satisfied the MDHE for the time being, but another review is scheduled for 2014. No further information regarding the format or consequences of the next review has been provided to the University."

Read more here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 01/16/2012 - 2:48am by Information Architect.

Adam Kirsch reviews Rome: Day One, Rome and Rhetoric, The Romans and Their World, Caligula, Invisible Romans, and Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History in the January 9th issue of The New Yorker. An abstract of the review is available online for free; subscribers have full access.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 01/16/2012 - 2:41am by Information Architect.

"You might not think that a collaboration to study the chemical and physical properties of ancient Attic pottery would have anything to do with space missions, but, well, you'd be mistaken. Earlier this year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded nearly $500,000 to scientists from the Getty Conservation Institute, Stanford's National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and the Aerospace Corporation to do just that."

Read more at discovery.com.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 01/01/2012 - 7:31pm by Information Architect.

"Emmett L. Bennett Jr., a classicist who played a vital role in deciphering Linear B, the Bronze Age Aegean script that defied solution for more than 50 years after it was unearthed on clay tablets in 1900, died on Dec. 15 in Madison, Wis. He was 93. His daughter Cynthia Bennett confirmed the death. Professor Bennett was considered the father of Mycenaean epigraphy — that is, the intricate art of reading inscriptions from the Mycenaean period, as the slice of the Greek Bronze Age from about 1600 to 1200 B.C. is known. His work, which entailed analysis so minute that he could eventually distinguish the handwritings of many different Bronze Age scribes, helped open a window onto the Mycenaean world."

Read the entire obituary online at The New York Times.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Sun, 01/01/2012 - 4:28pm by .

APA Annual Meeting Session 35 (Saturday, January 7, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m., Marriott Grand Ballroom I), is a discussion of the literary, historical, art historical, religious, and political possibilities raised by John Miller's Goodwin Prize-Winning book.  Incoming President-Elect Denis Feeney will be the moderator.  Panelists will briefly summarize their papers but will not read them in their entirety so as to leave more time for discussion.  The papers are therefore posted here.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 12/30/2011 - 4:01pm by Adam Blistein.

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