CFP: The Spatial Turn in Roman Studies

CfP: The spatial turn in Roman studies

Auckland, January 22-24 2020
Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

We write to announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it. The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context.

Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies (Auckland)’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

---
 
(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

The automated system for the 2013-2014 APA Placement Service is now open and accepting registrations by candidates, subscribers, and institutions.  As was the case last year, registrants will need to create an account and then purchase the service(s) they wish.  Registrants who used the Service last year may (but are not required to) adopt the same username and password as before; however, they will still need to create a new account

Please read these detailed instructions for registering for the service and taking advantage of its features. 

Please note the following important changes in the service this year.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 07/26/2013 - 1:53pm by Adam Blistein.

The members of the Department of Classical Studies at Duke University regret to announce the passing of their colleague, Lawrence Richardson, Jr. at the age of 92. An obituary appeared on July 25, 2013, in the Raleigh News and Observer.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/25/2013 - 7:46pm by Adam Blistein.

8th Trends in Classics
Thessaloniki International Conference on Roman Drama

May 29-June 1, 2014  

(To be held in Auditorium I,
Aristotle University, Research Dissemination Center
September 3rd Avenue, University Campus  
http://kedea.rc.auth.gr)

Roman Drama and its Contexts

Scholarship, especially in the past, has been reading Roman drama from the perspective of its relation to Greek and Roman prototypes, and its historical context and evolution. Contemporary readings, following recent groundbreaking work based on intertextual, dramatological, performative, psychoanalytical, feminist, gender oriented approaches, philosophical analysis and aesthetics, etc., offer new valuable insights into Roman drama’s poetics and cultural impact.

The conference aims at focusing on the interpretation of Roman comedy, tragedy and the fragments on the basis of such diverse approaches, as mentioned above. By highlighting the various aesthetic, social and historical parameters, the papers are expected to explore ways in which Roman comic and tragic texts fit into their narrower and/or broader textual and cultural contexts.

Organizing Committee

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 07/24/2013 - 8:23pm by .

The APA is a member of the National Humanities Alliance (NHA), a consortium of over a hundred scholarly and professional associations; higher education associations; organizations of museums, libraries, historical societies and state humanities councils; university-based and independent humanities research centers; and colleges and universities.  NHA monitors national legislation and policy affecting the humanities and informed us this week that the Appropriations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives has recommended that the 2014 fiscal year appropriation for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) be $79 million, a 49% reduction from its 2013 appropriation of $154.3 million. 

The NHA’s web site contains more information about this recommendation as well as a mechanism that APA members can use to write to their Representatives about a level of funding that would seriously reduce the NEH’s ability to support research in the humanities and share the work of humanities scholars with a wider public.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 07/23/2013 - 5:13pm by Adam Blistein.

We are posting a call for signatures to a petition launched by our colleagues in Bern, Switzerland, and circulated by Prof. Thomas Späth, the President of the Swiss Association of Classical Philologists.  As you will see from the message, the canton of Bern is proposing to abolish the study of Greek (and Russian) in high schools.  This is a bad enough step in itself, but if successful it may start a domino effect and make the other cantons consider the abolition of Greek as well.  We thought this was an important petition to draw to your attention, and we urge members to read the message and to consider signing the petition.

Denis Feeney

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 07/22/2013 - 3:10pm by Adam Blistein.

Jennifer Ebbler, Associate Professor at UT Austin, in The Chronicle (http://chronicle.com/article/Introduction-to-Ancient/140475/)

"I spent last year "flipping" my 400-student "Introduction to Ancient Rome" course. For those unfamiliar with the term, "flipping a class" means that students watch lectures online outside of class and then spend class time participating in discussions and working on problems.

"It's a concept that has gotten an undeservedly bad name because supporters of so-called disruptive education have tied it to the controversial massive-open-online-course movement, which says students are served just as well, if not better, by an absent "star" professor than by faculty members employed by their university."

Read more …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/22/2013 - 2:38pm by Information Architect.

A CAMNE Conference at Durham University
20-22 September 2013
Department of Classics and Ancient History, Durham University, 38 North Bailey, Durham, DH1 3EU, England

'The cosmos of a polis is manpower, of a body beauty, of a soul wisdom, of an action virtue, of a speech truth, and the opposites of these make for acosmia.'

- Gorgias, Encomium of Helen 1

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 07/08/2013 - 1:24pm by .

The Chronicle of Higher Education has recently published three articles arguing against the "conventional wisdom" about enrollments in the humanities and financial outcomes of humanities students.  They are by

Alexander Beecroft, Executive Director of the American Comparative Literature Association

Michael Berube, Past President of the Modern Language Association

Anthony Grafton and James Grossman, Past President and Executive Director, respectively, of the American Historical Association. 

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 07/04/2013 - 8:00pm by Adam Blistein.

The APA Office will be closed on Thursday and Friday, July 4 and 5, 2013.  We will reopen on Monday, July 8.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 07/01/2013 - 1:40pm by Adam Blistein.

Tutto Theatre Company of Austin, Texas, proudly announces the world premiere of Zeus in Therapy, an original theatrical experience adapted from the unpublished poetry of Douglass Stott Parker by the company, and directed by Gary Jaffe.  In 1979, Prof. Parker began writing Zeus in Therapy, a cycle of 52 poems which imagines Zeus on the therapist’s couch. Parker did not ‘finish’ it, though he stopped writing in about 1993, and left it unpublished during his lifetime. Every new poem in the cycle was shared both on his office door and with his classes on a weekly basis for some 25 years. Parker’s poetry is whimsical and profound, cosmic and quotidian, thoughtful and irreverent, but always heartfelt and true. The Company’s translation of Zeus in Therapy into a theatrical experience will bring the power of his words to an even larger audience.

In this adaptation, a diverse ensemble of eleven performers will play Zeus, giving Parker’s words a dynamic range of expression.  Zeus in Therapy runs August 16th through 25th at the Rollins Studio Theater in The Long Center for the Performing Arts in Austin.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/01/2013 - 1:01pm by Adam Blistein.

Pages

Latest Stories

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy