CFP: Statius – author of a coherent œuvre?

Statius – author of a coherent œuvre?

Newcastle University, 26-28 May 2022

The œuvre of the Flavian poet Statius is full of surprising contrasts: it consists of the polished Thebaid and the unfinished Achilleid, alongside the Silvae, a collection of semi-improvised occasional poems. At first sight, this œuvre seems as diverse as that of hardly any other extant Latin author. However, Statius uses precisely his occasional poems for setting his works in relation to each other. As early as the praefatio of the first book of the Silvae, Statius justifies himself for publishing these poetic products after just completing his Thebaid. As soon as a successor to his first epic is in sight, he also makes the Achilleid that is about to come into being part of his œuvre. Many implicit and explicit cross-references between the three works suggest that Statius is creatively engaging with the Callimachean-Vergilian idea of a poet’s unified œuvre. In general, when reading Statius’ works in parallel, one is struck by a plethora of shared ideas and motives, whose importance has so far not yet been fully realised and interpreted. These connections between Statius’ works with respect both to their production and reception will be the focus of our international conference.

Possible paper topics include, but are by no means limited to: 

- What is the status of a Roman author’s second epic – especially given that Statius is the first post-Vergilian epicist, who after the completion of his first epic has at least started a second one?

- To what extent does an author’s œuvre comprise imaginary works and works that have not been realised, such as the epic of Domitian that Statius announces in all of his three works?

- Which reference points from the literary tradition are relevant for the idea of a unified œuvre by Statius, and why?

- What does the connection between Statius' works entail for the conception of the missing portion of the unfinished Achilleid?

- To what extent does the reception of Statius' works suggest that they have been seen as a unified œuvre?

- Statius' epics and the Silvae can be read as the two poles of highly polished vs. – allegedly – improvised poetry. What is the meaning, in this context, of shared motives, ideas and poetic techniques?

- The epics are set in the mythological world, the Silvae in contemporary Roman life: does this then also mean that Statius' mythological epics should be read as actually referring to Domitianic Rome, or rather as precisely not referring to it?

Confirmed speakers:

Antony Augoustakis; Helge Baumann; Federica Bessone; Gregor Bitto; Peter Heslin; Alison Keith; Gottfried Kreuz; Helen Lovatt; Charles McNelis; Emily C. Mitchell; Carole Newlands; François Ripoll; Cedric Scheidegger Lämmle; Claire Stocks; Anke Walter

We are applying for external funding, which would cover travel and accommodation.

Please send us an abstract of no more than 500 words by 30 September 2021.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the organisers:

Gregor Bitto (Gregor.Bitto@ku.de) and Anke Walter (anke.walter@newcastle.ac.uk)

PD Dr. Gregor Bitto

Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt

Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaftliche Fakultät

Klassischen Philologie

Universitätsallee 1

85072 Eichstätt

 

PD Dr. Anke Walter

School of History, Classics and Archaeology

Newcastle University

Newcastle NE1 7RU

Großbritannien

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Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

Seton Hall University – University Libraries (Fall 2021)
Application Deadline: July 15, 2021
Fellowship Period: Fall 2021

Background

Seton Hall University Libraries support excellence in academic and individual work, enable inquiry, foster intellectual and ethical integrity and respect for diverse points of view through user-focused services and robust collections as the intellectual and cultural heart of the University.  Walsh Gallery, based in the Library, manages the University’s museum collections, and the Library’s Data Services division assists the University community in managing and presenting their data.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 10:55am by Erik Shell.

The ACLS is running two searches this summer at ACLS. They seek a Program Officer in International Programs (regular ongoing staff position) and a Program Officer in Higher Education Initiatives (two year term).

These positions are excellent for classics Ph.D.s looking to stay in academic contexts but do a different kind of work from teaching and researching.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 10:53am by Erik Shell.

The SCS Board of Directors has co-signed the following statement, which has been authored jointly by the American Association of University Professors, the American Historical Association, the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and PEN America. As of June 16, 2021, 80 organizations have endorsed the statement.

You can read the full text and list of signatories below and read the press release by the American Historical Association here

June 16, 2021

We, the undersigned associations and organizations, state our firm opposition to a spate of legislative proposals being introduced across the country that target academic lessons, presentations, and discussions of racism and related issues in American history in schools, colleges and universities. These efforts have taken varied shape in at least 20 states; but often the legislation aims to prohibit or impede the teaching and education of students concerning what are termed “divisive concepts.” These divisive concepts as defined in numerous bills are a litany of vague and indefinite buzzwords and phrases including, for example, “that any individual should feel or be made to feel discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological or emotional distress on account of that individual’s race or sex.” These legislative efforts are deeply troubling for numerous reasons.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 7:09am by Helen Cullyer.

TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

Supported by a Generous Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:16pm by Erik Shell.

Call for papers: Human Crime and Divine Punishment in Ancient Didactic poetry

Trinity College Dublin, 10-11 March 2022

As has long been observed, ancient Didactic poetry is not merely a vehicle to convey technical information and instruction. Justice and the place of humanity in the cosmos are already central concerns of Hesiod’s Works and Days, which attributes the harsh realities of agricultural life to a history of transgression, moral decline, and punishment. Similar questions continue to fascinate his didactic successors, who not only develop Hesiodic material, for instance in the departure of Justice from Earth in Aratus’ Phaenomena, but also explore other manifestations of divine intervention, such as through myths of metamorphosis and catasterism. In some didactic poems, such as Virgil’s Georgics or Oppian’s Halieutica, the pursuit of their subject matter itself poses the risk of violating ethical norms or overstepping mortal boundaries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:09pm by Erik Shell.

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:03pm by Erik Shell.

City Lit, one of London’s largest adult education colleges, and the British Museum are organising Classics Week.

Classics Week runs from 21-25 June 2021 and takes inspiration from the British Museum’s current exhibition Nero: the man behind the myth (27 May- 24 Oct).  Join us for a programme of online talks, discussions, and taster courses exploring the subject of power in ancient Rome.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:40pm by Erik Shell.
A page from Martin Kraus’ Aethiopica Epitome processed using LatinOCR within VietOCR. It handles the opening chapter summary well but is only 88% accurate with the italicized body text.

LatinOCR and Rescribe are related optical character recognition (OCR) tools that substantially accelerate the conversion of scanned Latin to Unicode text and, in the case of Rescribe, to searchable PDF format. Both are pleasant to use but require a degree of comfort with command-line tools, at least to get up and running.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:34pm by .
The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, the Network for the Study of the Archaic and Classical Greek Song, and CHS Greece invite you to attend Performing Texts, an international virtual conference to be held from June 30 through July 4, 2021.
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 9:29am by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted here)

Seattle, Washington - Rochelle Elizabeth Snee, born December 6, 1947, in Trenton, NJ, passed away at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, WA on Sunday, September 6, 2020.

Rochelle was a 1965 graduate of Dulaney High School in Lutherville - Timonium, MD. She earned her B.A. degree at the University of Maryland at College Park, majoring in Classical Studies under Wilhelmina Jashemski. She attended the University of Washington, where she earned both an M.A. and a PhD in Classics with a concentration in the Byzantine Period.

As a Classics scholar, Rochelle had many opportunities for both study and travel. She had fellowships at Colby College in Waterville, ME, to work with fellow classicists Dorothy Koonce and Peter Westervelt; and in Washington, D.C., she continued her study of Byzantium with fellowships at both Dumbarton Oaks and Catholic University. In Rome she translated ancient Greek documents in the Vatican Library; in Jerusalem she read ancient manuscripts available only to those with special permission; in Istanbul she researched for an article on Gregory Nazianzen's Anastasia Church. She was on the faculty of Pacific Lutheran University, where she taught ancient Greek, Latin, and imbued students with a knowledge of ancient history.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 06/09/2021 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.

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