CFP: XVI FIEC International Conference

Call for Papers 

Fédération internationale des associations d’études classiques (FIEC)

XVI International Conference, 1–5 August 2022
 

Mexico City 

(Virtual Meeting Format) 

Hesperides Sponsored Session 

"Hesperian Transformations: New Approaches to the Classical Tradition" 

Proposal Deadline: July 12, 2021 

  

Hesperides, a new scholarly organization for the study of the legacies of the ancient Mediterranean in Luso-Hispanic contexts, invites papers for a panel at the upcoming conference of FIEC, to be held virtually in Mexico in 2022. This session, part of “Module 1: Discourses of appropriation and identity,” will showcase the breadth of contemporary scholarship on diverse manifestations of Greco-Roman traditions across and between Iberian contact zones, from the Mediterranean, to the Americas, the Caribbean, the Pacific, and beyond. 

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To present the most inclusive snapshot of current scholarship in these contexts, this panel seeks papers that transcend traditional disciplinary distinctions, periodizations, geographic boundaries, and linguistic divides. We therefore welcome submissions from scholars whose work engages with classical legacies as they intersect with any of these cultural, geographic, or linguistic contexts, from premodernity to the 21st century. 

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The panel invites participants to consider these perspectives through the metaphor of transformation, which gives equal emphasis to receiving contexts and received cultures (Baker, Helmrath and Kallendorf 2019), or through alternative methodologies that highlight the importance of such contexts for the modification of received cultures. Successful submissions will reflect on these Hesperian transformations for current conceptions of the discipline of classics more generally. Possible areas of inquiry include: 

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—new methods and theoretical models for interpreting the uses of classical antiquity beyond the Global North 

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—studies of classical reception that trace original political, ideological or philosophical re-elaborations of antiquity in Luso-Hispanic contexts 

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—the contributions of those who have been overlooked in previous scholarship, such as indigenous, Afrodescendent, and female voices 

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—diverse forms of cultural production, learned and popular, across media and modality, representing non-elite in addition to elite perspectives 

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—analyses of classical reception through the lenses of non-European modalities of time, space, ontology and epistemologies 

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—aesthetic or literary studies of classical texts and art that acquire new forms or different meanings in Luso-Hispanic contexts 

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—engagement with critical theories and frameworks outside the field of classics that enrich the study of antiquity and its reception 

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Please send a proposal for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment (Microsoft Word .doc) to , with the title “FIEC: Hesperian Transformations” in the subject line. The deadline for submissions is July 5, 2021. Submissions should include the information indicated below and will be reviewed anonymously by the organizers, who will make final selections by July 19, 2021. The languages of FIEC are English, French, German, Italian and Spanish. 

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Please include the following information in your proposal submission: 

  • Name 
  • Country 

  • Institutional affiliation 

  • Academic degree 

  • Discipline/career 

  • Reference information for your three most recent publications 

  • Title for proposed paper 

  • Referential bibliography about your theme ( maximum 5 titles) : 

  • Abstract (300 words max)

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