Conference: Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

17:00-19:00 Opening Session

Greetings

Sergiu Hart, Head of the Humanities Division,Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Organizing Committee

Keynote Lecture

Chair: Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Tel Aviv University

Niall W. Slater, Emory University Textualization from the Bottom Up

Monday, 21 June, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

9:30-11:00 Session I:

Linguistic AspectsChair: Hannah Rosén, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Aaron Koller, Yeshiva UniversityTextualization and Oralization in Early Near Eastern Writing

Ronald Blankenborg, Radboud UniversityDeictic Phonation in Textualization: Pragmatically Preserved Greek Particles

Rodrigo Verano, Complutense University of MadridHow to Make a Literary Text of a Conversation: Evidence from Plato’s Dialogues

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session II:

Material CultureChair: Benjamin Isaac, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University

Raymond F. Person, Jr., Ohio Northern University Textualization across Media: A Case Study Based on Person Reference in Talk and Material Culture

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University Speaking Objects as Texts

Manuela Giordano, University of Siena Textualizing Democracy and The Eion Herms

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session III:

Homer and Hesiod Chair: David Schaps, Bar-Ilan University

Elizabeth Minchin, Australian National UniversityMoving Towards Textualization: Evidence for Poetic Preparation in Homer

Massimo Giuseppetti, Università degli Studi Roma Tre Textualization as Interpolation? Reconsidering Repetition in Greek Epic Poetry

Ruth Scodel, University of MichiganWorks and Days and the Difficulties of Textualization

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45 Session IV:

Early PoetryChair: Deborah Gera, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deborah Beck, University of Texas at AustinSappho, Lyric, and Biography: Textualization as a Mode of Thought

Jan Skarbek-Kazanecki, University of ŁodzThe Transmission of the Theognidean Tradition as a Mnemonic Cultural Practice

Andrea Rotstein, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phoenician Oral Poetry: The Missing Link

Tuesday 22 June, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club Room 405The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

09:30-11:00 Session V:

Greek ProseChair: Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University

Greetings: Barak Medina, Rector, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Giulia Donelli, University of Bristol Between Orality and Textuality: Epigraphical Letters and Early Greek Literary Prose

Christopher Haddad, Oxford University From Elocution to Epistolography

Uri Yiftach, Tel Aviv UniversityBetween Law and Phantasy: Court Proceedings as a Source on Language, Style and Literature

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session VI:

Textualizing Historical Figures Chair: Donna Shalev, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Il-Kweon Sir, Cambridge University Early Greek Tyrannic Discourse and the Textualization of the Tyrant

Margalit Finkelberg, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University Textualizing Socrates: Plato’s Version

Lisa Cordes, Humboldt UniversityTextualizing Historical Figures in Cicero’s Dialogues – Dynamics and Ambiguities

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club, Room 405 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

9:30-11:00 Session VII:

Textualizing Popular Traditions Chair: Joseph Geiger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniela Dueck, Bar-Ilan UniversityTextualizing Naïve Geography in Classical Antiquity

Daniel Wendt, Free University Berlin(Con) Textualizing Anecdotes. Written Orality and Natural Narratives in Livy’s Early History of Rome

Sonia Pertsinidis, Australian National UniversityThe Eagle and the Serpent: Textualization and the Fables of Babrius

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 SessionVIII:

BetweenTextandPerformance Chair: Yoav Rinon, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniel Anderson, Coventry University Early Writing Metaphors in Performance

Łukasz Berger, Adam Mickiewicz UniversityOral Design in Plautus’ Verse: The Context of Rehearsal and Performance

Alexander Kirichenko, Humboldt UniversityHow to Do Things with Letters: Orality and Textuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session IX:

Late AntiquityChair: Gabriel Danzig, Bar-Ilan University

Han Baltussen, The University of AdelaideFact, Fiction or ‘Faction’? Eunapius’ Use of Written and Oral Sources

Chiara Militello, University of CataniaFrom Literacy to Orality and Back: The Complex Textualization of Late Neoplatonic Lectures

Hossein Sheikh, University of GöttingenEstablishment and Composition of the Zoroastrian Legal Corpus after the Muslim Conquests

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45  Session X:

Textualization and Religion Chair: Guy Stroumsa, Academy Member;

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Oxford University

Jordi Redondo, University of Valencia Oral Patterns in the Greek Pentateuch?

Maren Niehoff, The Hebrew University of JerusalemPreserving or Creating Orality in Texts? The Sermons of Origen and Rabbi Abbahu

Evgenia Moiseeva, Salzburg University The Rise of the Written Word in Manichaeism

Concluding Remarks

The conference will take place at The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Albert Einstein Square, 43 Jabotinsky St., Jerusalem, and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus CampusThe event will be streamed live on the Israel Academy website: www.academy.ac.il and on Zoom by pre-registration

links to zoom and to registration for physical attendence

https://academy.ac.il/Index/Entry.aspx?nodeId=936&entryId=22423

link to conference site https://oralityliteracyxiv.wordpress.com

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Mary Beard in conversation with Vanessa Stovall and Ky Merkley

In Dialogue: Trans Studies and Classics works to bring some of the insights and lived experiences found in transgender studies into conversation with the Classics, in the hope that bringing these into dialogue with each other will enrich our pedagogy, deepen our understanding of what gender as an identity category even means, and help critique the various ways gender has been used as an instrument of power throughout history, while also creating a more inclusive and supportive environment for our students. If you’d like to contribute to this column or have ideas that could add to this conversation, email Ky Merkley.

When the latest ‘Twitter storm’ (to quote Mary Beard) broke out, my Twitter feed rapidly filled with heated denunciations of ‘cancel culture,’ cruel words directed at trans folx, and pontifications about the state of Classics. For many members of the trans community, this Twitter ‘dialogue’ was exhausting. Every day, a new blog post or article added more fuel to an ever-growing fire.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/17/2021 - 10:19am by .
LGBT Meets SPQR Logo

I wish that LGBT Meets SQPR had existed as I began my journey into Greco-Roman antiquity in high school. As a closeted gay youth, I was eager to find stories, experiences, and anecdotes that could help me understand my identity better and not feel quite so alone. Modern LGBTQIA+ youth seem to gravitate towards Classics for such resources and community-building. In a survey conducted by Hannah Clarke, young queer people indicated that their interest in Classics stemmed from the fact that “Classics remedies, to a certain extent, anxieties of feeling culturally temporary. [The survey respondents] describe the visibility of queer figures in Classics classes as providing a sort of temporal anchor, which proves that they are not the result of a trend, something that came about in the 70s, something that is having a moment and could potentially vanish once more.”

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The 2021 season of the Digital Classicist London seminar is on the theme of world classics: we have put together a programme of speakers who are working with digital humanities and digital classics methods to the study of antiquity—whether language, corpora, archaeology—from across the world. All sessions are streamed live on Youtube, and will also be available to watch there afterwards.

All seminars at 17:00 (UK time).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 5:27pm by Erik Shell.

(Sent on behalf of Lawrence Kowerski)

Dear friends of the Classics Program at Hunter College,

Please join us Friday, May 14, at 5pm for the 83rd Josephine Earle Memorial Lecture (see the attached poster). The lecture is taking place virtually over Zoom, and pre-registration is required at the link below. In addition to the lecture, the event will begin with a student award ceremony and a celebration of recent graduates from the Classics Program at Hunter.

83rd Josephine Earle Memorial Lecture, Friday, May 14, 5-7pm

"What did the Romans want from their law?"

Michael Peachin, Professor of Classics (New York University)

Register at this link:

https://huntercollege.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwodu2prDwjHd0KuXntHJFFpwQ8YOY6WivN

(If the link doesn't take you to a registration screen when you click on it, please try cutting and pasting it manually into your browser. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.)

We hope to see many of you there!

Lawrence Kowerski
Associate Professor in Classics (Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 4:41pm by Erik Shell.
"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 12:52pm by Erik Shell.

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(A message from Dennis Looney, MLA)

I hope the semester/quarter is ending up well. Come celebrate at the 2021 MLA Leadership Institute: Why Humanities Now: https://www.adfl.mla.org/Seminars/MLA-Academic-Program-Services-Leadership-Institute-Why-Humanities-Now

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See below for brief descriptions.  Use the link above for access to the full program and registration.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/10/2021 - 10:14am by Erik Shell.

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Free but booking required: https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24399

The Combined Classics Library holds over 150,000 volumes on Greco-Roman antiquity, including a number of special collections. One is the Wood Archive, a collection of diaries, notebooks, sketchbooks and published works relating to a tour of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Levant, made by between May 1750 and June 1751 by the classical scholar Robert Wood, the archaeologists John Bouverie (who died during the tour) and James Dawkins, and the draughtsman Giovanni Battista Borra. Another is the Ehrenberg Bequest, a collection of antiquities, mostly ceramics, bequeathed to the Institute of Classical Studies in 1976 by Victor Ehrenberg, on the understanding that the collection was to be used for teaching and handling.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/10/2021 - 6:29am by Erik Shell.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 05/07/2021 - 6:57am by Erik Shell.

Cartledge Title and Abstract

Learning from the Past: Classics and the Contemporary World

Prof. Paul Cartledge (University of Cambridge)

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/03/2021 - 10:25am by Erik Shell.

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