Conference: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

In collaboration with The Imagines Project (http://imagines-project.org)

Practicalities: How to sign up for the whole conference or only for the panel(s) and/or workshop(s) you are interested in attending.

https://masseyuni.wufoo.com/forms/m1agvqub0ndacqr/

Registration and attendance are free. All are welcome, but there is a limited number of places.

Day 1: 24 June 2021 (for Northern Hemisphere participants)

25 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Welcome by Professor Kerry Taylor

Head of the School of Humanities, Media and Creative Communication

Massey University, New Zealand

Greetings and brief opening remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand) and Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:45am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain and Italy: 9:00-10:45pm (evening of the 24th June)

UK: 8:00-9:45 pm (evening of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 3:00-4:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 12:00-1:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 1: Rethinking Classical Reception Theory and Methodology

Chair: Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Suspended Temporalities, Female Otherness, and Classical Reception

Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • Rethinking Dialogue Models: The Case of the Phaedrus

Lauren Wilson (The University of Nottingham)

  • Fortuna dell’antico (and Beyond): The State of Reception Studies in Italy

Tiziana Ragno (Università di Foggia)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 24th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 2: Screen Receptions

Chair: Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • Palimsestic Idols: Classical Receptions in Silent Film Stardom

Michael Williams (University of Southampton)

  • Mocking the Hollywood Canon: Parodies of Celluloid Classics from Latin American Cinema’s Studio Era

Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Masked Celluloid Classics? In Search of the Tragic Heroine Electra in Film Noir

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

Day 2:
Friday 25 June
(for both Northern and Southern Hemispheres)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:00pm

The Netherlands: 9:00-10:00am

The UK: 8:00-9:00am

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 1: New Voices in Classical Reception

Ronald Blankenborg, Nils Lommerde, Jarnick Maarse and Loes Wolters (Radboud University, The Netherlands).

25 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

26 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 26th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 3: Popular Culture

Chair: Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

  • Classics on the Surface: Classical Reception as an Emergent Process

Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • The Merging of Eastern and Western Traditions: Manga and the Power of the Classical Object

Amanda Potter (Open University) and Guendalina Daniela Maria Taietti (University of Liverpool)

  • Escaping ‘Hades’: Playing with Classical Reception
    Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 4: Performance Reception

Chair: Martina Treu (Università IULM, Milan)

  • Theatre, Politics, and Money: Karolos Koun’s Art Theatre, the Greek Dictatorship, and the Ford Foundation

Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • The “Advent of the New Order”: An Oresteia in Prague (1947) and the Epistemological Limits of Archivalia

Alena Sarkissian (Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague)

  • Persistence of Tragedy: Antigone Today
    Meryem Denyz (Stanford University)

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:00-9:30pm (evening of the 26th June)

Italy: 10:00-11:30am (morning of the 26th June)

UK: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 2: Greek Tragedy in a Time of Pandemic with Declan Patrick (University of Waikato), Holly C. Luton (AUT) and Stephe Harrop (University of Hope, Liverpool) in conversation with Anastasia Bakogianni.

The three theatre practitioners, two from New Zealand (Patrick and Luton) and one from the UK (Harrop) discuss their productions of Greek tragedy during the Covid-19 pandemic and the challenges they faced and overcame. Join us for a lively conversation illustrated with images, video and three unique perspectives.

Day 3: 26 June (Northern Hemisphere)

27 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 27th June)

Spain and Egypt: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Panel 5: Modern Societal Challenges and the Classics

Chair: Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • The Master’s Tools?: Towards a Politics of Reception

Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Ecoclassicisms: Ecocriticism and Classical Reception

Samuel Cooper (American University in Cairo)

  • Classical Reception in Disability Studies: Mary Duffy Imagining Alternative Futures

Amanda Kubic (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:00am (morning of the 27th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:00pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 10:00-11:00pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:00pm (early evening of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:00pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Workshop 3: Playing with Design with Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

If you’ve ever thought about designing a tabletop game about your research area to play in the classroom but don’t know where to start, then this is the workshop for you! Classicist and game designer Hamish Cameron will give a brief introduction to some general design concepts and considerations, then you’ll split into groups to brainstorm how you might start turning your idea into a game. The session will be a combination of Game Design for Academics and social hour. You probably won’t design a complete game, but you might get some cool ideas that lead to a complete game later. You’ll also get to chat with other folk interested in designing games for the classroom.

Day 4: 27 June (Northern Hemisphere)

28 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:15am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:15pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 8:15-9:15pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 6: Education in Academia and Beyond

Chair:  Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • Social Justice-Engaged Reception Pedagogy: "Classics Beyond Whiteness" at Wake Forest

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University) and Caitlin Hines (University of Cincinnati)

  • Talking about Silence: How and Why to teach Classical Rape Stories

Caroline Bristow (University of Cambridge), Susan Deacy and Aimee Hinds (University of Roehampton)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:30-9:30am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 10:30-11:30pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 9:30-10:30pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 4:30-5:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 1:30-2:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 7: Digital Pedagogy and Public Engagement

Chair: Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Classical Reception Meets Pedagogy: The Creation and Uses of the Panoply Vase Animation Project's Our Mythical Childhood Animations

Sonya Nevin (University of Roehampton/Panoply Vase Animation Project)

  • Classical Reception Beyond the Classroom: Engaging Public Audiences with Remaking Ancient Myths

Emma Bridges (The Open University)

Brief concluding remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni

The End!

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Dear members,

We have a number of deadlines that fall prior to mid-November. Please see the following:

October 31: Nominations for the Forum Prize

November 1: Applications for annual meeting participation stipends and childcare / dependent care funding

November 1: Nominations and applications for the K-12 Teaching Excellence Award

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/21/2021 - 11:40am by Erik Shell.
A bronze bust of a man with short, wavy hair and a slightly pained expression on his face.

The Seleucid empire has long stood on the fringes of Classical scholarship. Following the conquest of the east by Alexander, the vast, multicultural construction lasted from 312–64 BCE, stretching from modern Turkey south to the Levantine coast and east into Afghanistan. Interdisciplinary by its very nature, Seleucid history straddles the boundaries of academic disciplines, languages, and methodologies, further fragmenting the study of an already fractured power. Recent holistic studies are rare, making the 2014 publication of Paul Kosmin’s comprehensive The Land of the Elephant Kings something of a groundbreaking study. The examination of what Kosmin calls the “territorialization” of the empire—the ideological constructions and experiences that bounded, ordered, and defined the imperial realms—changed the nature of Seleucid studies by intensifying the focus of the recent “spatial turn” in the humanities.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/18/2021 - 9:53am by .

(From the Classics Department at Princeton)

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 10/15/2021 - 9:14am by Erik Shell.
Poster for the play, Plautus's Casina. A minimalist digital design with a blue background; mountain shapes in pink, yellow, and orange; walls with windows in the same colors; and an ancient statue of a woman.

In the Spring of 2021, as her undergraduate UIC Honors College Capstone project, my student Luana Davila adapted and produced a version of Plautus’ Casina in the style of a telenovela. Due to COVID, she was not able to stage the play, but she produced a filmed version in collaboration with theater students at Columbia College in Chicago. For safety reasons, each actor’s scenes were filmed separately, then edited together. Below is an interview with Luana and the play’s director, Amy Gerwert Valdez, a Theater Directing major at Columbia.  [Editor’s note: the transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.]

Krishni Burns: Can we start with a description of your project?

Luana Davila: The project aimed to tie together patriarchal society in ancient Rome and in Latinx cultures (or in the case of this production, Mexico). My play was adapted in such a way that the original storyline was changed as little as possible, proving that its seemingly ridiculous events made for a believable tale in modern Mexico. This was done to show how interconnected the two cultures are, even though they existed thousands of years apart.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/11/2021 - 10:33am by Krishni Burns.

The members of the Committee on the C. J. Goodwin Award of Merit are delighted to announce that the 2021 winners of the Goodwin Awards are Aileen R. Das (University of Michigan), Ellen Oliensis (University of California Berkeley), and Andreas Willi (University of Oxford).

Please click on the names below to read the full award citations written by committee members David Konstan and James I. Porter (co-chairs), Harriet Flower, Richard Hunter, and Amy Richlin.

Aileen R. Das

Ellen Oliensis

Andreas Willi

Citation for Aileen R. Das, Galen and the Arabic Reception of Plato’s Timaeus, Cambridge University Press, 2020

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Sun, 10/10/2021 - 6:52pm by Helen Cullyer.
A Greek red-figure cup depicting the disembodied torso of a man, arms outstretched, and women on either side holding the torso

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, U.K., Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/08/2021 - 1:50pm by .
San Francisco

Hotel reservations are now open! 

The Hilton San Francisco Union Square is the official hotel for the 2022 Annual Meeting and will host the exhibit hall, all academic sessions, the opening night reception, and most related events.  The discounted group rate is $169 per night (plus applicable taxes). Additional rooms are available at the Hilton Parc 55 across the street.  A limited number are available for $159 per night (plus applicable taxes) for reservations made by October 31st.  Click on the links below to make your reservations. You can also make a reservation by calling 1-800-HILTONS and using code AIA or SCS to make your reservation. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/07/2021 - 3:26pm by Erik Shell.

Online Conference: “The Genre of Hymn in Antiquity”

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 10/06/2021 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.

The New England Classical Journal (NECJ) invites applications for the position of Book Review Editor, with the appointment to begin in December 2021.

The deadline for applications is 11:59 pm Eastern Time on Oct. 22, 2021. 

A publication of the Classical Association of New England (CANE), NECJ is a biannual, peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles, notes, and reviews on all aspects of classical antiquity. The journal is an Open Access Publication and is available at https://crossworks.holycross.edu/necj/ 

NECJ aims to publish reviews of books on a wide range of topics related to classical antiquity. Each issue of NECJ contains 4-6 book reviews of 1,200-1,500 words each, and the Book Review Editor is responsible for selecting books for review; finding reviewers; and working with reviewers to help them submit their completed reviews by the deadline. In this position the successful candidate will work with the journal’s Editor, Aaron Seider, and Managing Editor, Ruth Breindel, and will receive an honorarium of $1,000/per year for their work on the journal.

View full article. | Posted in Organizations on Wed, 10/06/2021 - 9:51am by Erik Shell.
Two pairs of teachers and students. The teacher on the left, seated on an uncushioned stool, plays a flute, his mantle pushed down to his waist. His young pupil stands facing him, wrapped in his mantle. The teacher in the center is seated on a cushion.

Our sixth interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Dr. Theodora B. Kopestonsky and Dr. Stephanie Kimmey. Dr. Stephanie Kimmey recently joined the Department of Classics at Colorado College as a Visiting Assistant Professor. She received her PhD in Art History and Archaeology from the University of Missouri, Columbia in 2017. Stephanie’s research explores the intersection of Greek religion and daily life through everyday objects and ceramics to better understand the individual, personal experiences through the things people leave behind. She has been active in excavations throughout Greece since 2006, working at Nemea, Mycenae, and Aidonia. Before joining Colorado College, Stephanie worked as the Assistant Director of the MU Writing Center.

Theodora B. Kopestonsky: How did you become interested in the field of Classics and, more specifically, what led you to Greek archaeology and field work?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/04/2021 - 10:32am by .

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