Contest: 2018 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest

Topic:  A classical “Wonder Woman” appearing out of her native context to save the day

The backstory of DC Comics’ Wonder Woman is heavily inspired by characters, places, and events from classical mythology.  DC’s Wonder Woman is portrayed as appearing in a variety of different places and times in history, all while maintaining her essential identity as the Amazon Princess Diana.  Entries for this contest should take a “Wonder Woman” from classical history, mythology, or literature and come up with some pretext for setting her in a place and time outside of her native one.  In that new context, this “Wonder Woman” should use her “super” powers/skills that are apparent from her portrayals in the classical world to solve some problem that was confounding the people of her new context.
 
This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high school (anywhere in the world) during the current school year. An award of $250.00 will be given to the author of the best entry written in English on the specified theme. The entry may be a short story, a play, a poem, or an original literary work of any other sort.

This contest was established in 1985 by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois, to honor Bernice L. Fox, to promote the study of Latin and the Classics in high schools, and to recognize the good work of high school students.

Judging

The entry should make frequent, specific, accurate, and appropriate references to events from historical or other classical sources, and to the circumstances of the context into which you are placing your “Wonder Woman.” Papers will be judged on accuracy to ancient sources, appropriate use of those sources, skillfulness in incorporating your “Wonder Woman” into your chosen context, originality, quality of material, thematic development, appropriateness, correctness of English style, and effectiveness of presentation.

Contest Guidelines

·       Entries must be typed, double-spaced, and on 8-1/2 x 11-inch paper.

·       Printing on both sides of a page is acceptable.

·       No electronic submissions.

·       The entry must fit the theme of this year's contest.

·       No minimum or maximum length is required.

·       The entrant's name and school must not appear on the entry.

·       Contestants should place a personal identification code (a randomly selected nine-character series) on the top left-hand corner of every page of the entry and on a separate 8-1/2 x 11-inch sheet of paper, which also contains the following information:

o   author's name, date of birth, and personal identification code;

o   school name, address, and phone number; and

o   teacher's name.

·       No more than ten entries will be accepted from any individual school, and only one entry per student will be accepted

·       Failure to follow these guidelines will result in disqualification.

·       All entries must be postmarked no later than March 15th, and mailed to the following address:

o   Dr. Robert Holschuh Simmons

o   Monmouth College

o   700 E. Broadway Ave.

o   Monmouth, IL 61462.

·       All entries become the property of Monmouth College.

·       The winner will be announced on or close to April 15th on the contest website.

·       Every entrant will receive a certificate of participation from Monmouth College.

·       For further information, including a list of previous winners, please consult the contest website (http://department.monm.edu/classics/Department/FoxContest/).

·       Send any questions to Dr. Simmons at rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu.

About Bernice L. Fox

Bernice L. Fox taught courses in English, Latin and Greek at Monmouth College from 1947 to 1981, and served as chair of the Department of Classics from 1970 until her retirement in 1981. Throughout her long and dynamic career, she worked tirelessly to promote the Classics in Illinois high schools and colleges. She is also the author of Tela Charlottae, the Latin translation of E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. In 1991, Monmouth College conferred on her the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. She died in 2003.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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St Andrews Graduate Conference in Ancient Philosophy 2018, on:
 
Teleology, Intelligence and Life in the Platonic and Aristotelian Tradition
 
Teleology plays a central role in both Plato’s and Aristotle’s philosophy. It is essential in particular for their cosmological views and their conceptions of intelligence (nous) and life. We are interested in a deeper understanding of both Plato’s and Aristotle’s approach to teleology in all their aspects and the principal differences between them. We invite graduate students to submit high-quality papers on any topic related to teleology within the Platonic or Aristotelian tradition, broadly construed, in antiquity.
 
 Keynote Speakers:
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 2:30pm by Erik Shell.

The Organizer Refereed Panel "Thirty Years of the Jeweled Style" has extended its deadline for abstract submission to March 5th.

See the original CFP here: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/150/call-abstracts-thir...

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 11:29am by Erik Shell.

Τὰ μεταξύ - Knowing where to draw the line: Intermediates and Dianoia in Plato

Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
5353 Parkside Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

We read in Aristotle’s Metaphysics that Plato regarded mathematical objects as intermediate between forms and particulars (987b14-18). Nowhere in the dialogues does Socrates talk explicitly about these “intermediates,” although it could be argued that there are several texts in which the intermediates are implied. Even if the intermediates were implied, however, it is not at all clear that they match up with the account that Aristotle gives us. The purpose of this event is to reconsider the evidence for and against the intermediates in the Platonic dialogues. Presentations on the ontological status of the objects of dianoia in Plato will be included.

Friday morning until early evening, we will discuss what Aristotle says in his Metaphysics, hear arguments about the implications of his claims and discuss the possibility of intermediates in the Phaedo. Saturday morning until early afternoon there will be presentations of papers and outlines of ideas regarding the possible intermediates in Plato’s Republic and the later dialogues as well as the ontological status of the objects of dianoia.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 10:43am by Erik Shell.

NEW APPROACHES TO THE ANCIENT GRECO-ROMAN MEDITERRANEAN

A GRADUATE SYMPOSIUM

September 28 – 30, 2018

The Program in Classical and Medieval Studies at Bates College invites papers on any topic related to new approaches to the cultures of the ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean, for a day-long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recent PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups.

The symposium will showcase new work by individuals from underrepresented groups in the professoriate, specifically defined as including African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 2:08pm by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted on Facebook by the Vergilian Society by Jim O'Hara)

The Vergilian Society notes with sadness the passing of Professor Eleanor Winsor Leach of the University of Indiana, who served the Society as a trustee in 1978-83 and as second and then first vice-president in 1989-92. Vergilians learned much from her articles on the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid, her landmark 1974 book on the Eclogues, her two major studies on the ties that link Roman literature, art, and society, and her many many articles on Latin poetry and painting and their reception. Both her many students, and all those of us who learned from her writings, will carry on her work and her memory.

(From Matthew Christ)

The Department of Classical Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, is very sorry to report that Eleanor W. Leach died on Friday, February 16, at the age of 80. Ellie will be sorely missed by all of us; it was characteristic of her strong spirit and commitment that she remained active as teacher and scholar up until the very end. We will circulate information concerning a service in her memory as soon as this is available.

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View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 1:29pm by Erik Shell.

By Roger Bagnall

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/19/2018 - 7:40pm by .
150th Meeting Logo

Members can click here to access our online program system for 2019 Annual Meeting submissions, affiliated group charters, and proposals for organizer-refereed panels for 2020.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/19/2018 - 6:56am by Helen Cullyer.

by  Erich Gruen

What put me on the path to Classics? No single event, no flash of lightning, no sudden illumination. Nor was it a gradual move, an increasing affection for a subject that slowly grew on me as I matured, a route that became more distinct and compelling as years passed. It is easy to construct such a smooth course toward an inevitable outcome in retrospect. But that is not how it happened.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 10:10pm by Wells Hansen.
Piazza Fountain

(From the Cornell Alumni Magazine)

A former translator of the Pope's messages into Latin has joined the Cornell faculty to spread the practice of spoken Latin in the classroom.

"He took students on forays around campus to translate the Latin incorporated in maps and artwork; had them haggle with each other in ersatz marketplaces; studied the Latin mottos on state seals; cast them in a mock trial for shoplifting; and more."

You can read the full article here.

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(Photo: "Piazza San Pietro Fountain" by Dennis Jarvis, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 11:04am by Erik Shell.
Tarquinius en Lucretia

Content Warning: The following post discusses classical narratives about sexual assault. Please note that the thoughts and opinions of SCS blog contributors are their own. 

Classics graduate student Sara L. Hales (University of Iowa) and Assistant Professor of Classics Arum Park (University of Arizona) explore how we read, discuss, and teach classical rape narratives in the midst of the #metoo movement.

Arum: Sara and I started writing on this topic independently and were brought together by our mutual friend Sarah Bond, who noted the common thread in our essays and encouraged us to collaborate. We found ourselves among those in the (fortunate? unfortunate?) position of reading classical rape narratives in the midst of a loud and persistent cultural conversation about sexual assault.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/14/2018 - 5:21pm by Sara L. Hales.

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Calls for Papers
The Organizer Refereed Panel "Thirty Years of the Jeweled Style" has extended
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
Τὰ μεταξύ - Knowing where to draw the line: Intermediates and Dia

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