The Inaugural SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecture

The Inaugural SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecture

The AIA’s Student Affairs Interest Group (SAIG) and SCS’s Graduate Student Committee (GSC) are pleased to announce the 2021 SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecture! This annual talk is a collaborative effort intended to highlight the work of a senior doctoral candidate whose research features interdisciplinary work between the fields of archaeology and classical philology, and to support the student networks between these related fields.

As the first SAIG/GSC Dissertation Lecturer, Elizabeth Heintges, doctoral candidate at Columbia University, will present “Forgetting Sextus Pompey: the bellum Siculum and Vergil’s Aeneid,” integrating both literary and material evidence into an analysis of two major moments in Roman Republican history. Please see the poster and abstract below for more details.

The lecture will be held virtually on Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 5:00 pm EST.
Please register here in advance of this Zoom webinar.
Any questions? Please don’t hesitate to reach out via email (studentaffairsaia@gmail.com).


Forgetting Sextus Pompey: the bellum Siculum and Vergil’s Aeneid
Elizabeth Heintges, PhD Candidate, Columbia University
Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 5:00 pm EST
Zoom registration

This paper examines the resonances between the Sicilian episodes in Vergil’s Aeneid and the historical bellum Siculum fought between the triumvirs and Sextus Pompey from 42-36 BCE. As contemporary accounts of this conflict are largely absent from the historical record (or otherwise follow the Res Gestae in characterizing the war as a pacification of the sea from pirates), the insights brought to bear by material sources—most significantly, the competing coinages of Sextus and Octavian, as well as Augustus’ later victory monuments—offer new insights into the dynamics at play between Vergil’s mythical Sicily and its very real and recent past. The numismatic evidence, when considered in tandem with the narratives of Appian and Cassius Dio, bears witness to the unique interplay between appropriation and suppression of Sextus’ iconographic and ideological program undertaken by Octavian after the battle of Naulochus in 36 BCE—an interplay that is likewise mirrored in Vergil’s poem in Aeneas’ circumnavigation of Sicily in Book 3 and in the ship race of Book 5.

Over the past decade, scholars have increasingly noted the importance of understanding Vergil’s Sicily in light of the conflicts of the First Punic War. Roman naval victories of the period appear to have garnered renewed interest at the end of the first century BCE outside the realm of literary production, given Augustus’ engagement with the commemorative monuments for Gaius Duilius’ victory at Mylae in 260 BCE. As we will have seen, the historical echoes in Vergil’s Sicily are not limited to the Punic Wars alone; instead, the poet uses the island in Aeneid 5—a turning-point in the narrative and a thematic hinge between Trojan past and Roman future—in order to collapse the time and space between these two major moments in Republican history.

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The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:43am by Erik Shell.
Goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone give grain to Triptolemos and teach him the art of agriculture. Marble Relief from Eleusis. ca. 430 BCE. Roman copy. ca. 27 BCE – 14 CE. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post highlights projects that foster engagement and education for school-aged children and young adults from California to Canada, Chicago to New York.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/26/2021 - 9:15am by .

The Executive Committee of the SCS has issued the following statement:

For several years, serious issues have arisen concerning online communications within the classics community. The SCS reminds its members to respect the dignity of one another in professional and private communications. These communications include, inter alia, social media posts and direct messages, private emails, and messages posted to email listservs. In view of these concerns the SCS Professional Matters Division is preparing guidelines for social media and other online communications.

Approved 2/25/2021

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Thu, 02/25/2021 - 4:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

Summer 2021 Election Slate

The 2020-2021 SCS Nominating Committee, co-chaired by Laurel Fulkerson and Celia Schultz, has worked hard through the late Fall 2020 and early 2021. The Committee is pleased to present the following slate of candidates for election in Summer 2021. All candidates listed below have agreed to stand. SCS will publish candidate statements in the late spring or early summer and online voting will begin as usual on or around August 1.

President-Elect (one to be elected)

Lesley Dean-Jones

Matthew Roller 

Financial Trustee (one to be elected)

Daniel Berman

Joseph Farrell

Vice President for Education (one to be elected)

Dani Bostick

Teresa Ramsby

Directors (two to be elected)

Yurie Hong

Young Richard Kim

Nandini Pandey

Bronwen Wickkiser

Craig Williams

Nominating Committee (two to be elected)

Ronnie Ancona

Pramit Chaudhuri

Joel Christensen

Akira Yatsuhashi

Program Committee (one to be elected)

Rosa Andújar

Denise Demetriou

Goodwin Committee (two to be elected)

Rhiannon Ash

Constanze Guthenke

Yopie Prins

Phiroze Vasunia 

Committee on Professional Ethics (two to be elected)

Deborah Beck

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 1:45pm by Erik Shell.
Banner of the Women's Classical Caucus, est. 1972

In Part 2 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020–2021 Leadership Award: Suzanne Lye, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award recognizes Dr. Lye’s extraordinary leadership and initiative in establishing, administering, and fundraising for the SCS-WCC Covid-19 Relief Fund. Since April 2020, this emergency microgrant fund has distributed no-strings-attached awards of up to $500 to North American classicists in need.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 10:27am by Caroline Cheung.
Gaius Gracchus addressing the plebeians. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

If there’s one thing in this divided America that we can all agree on, it’s that former president Donald J. Trump’s impeachment lawyer Bruce Castor was pretty crappy.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/18/2021 - 10:35am by Serena S Witzke.

The Classics Department at UNC-Chapel Hill is sad to announce that Philip A. Stadter died last week at the age of 84 in North Carolina. In over forty years of teaching at UNC, and in almost twenty years of a very active retirement, Philip wrote influential books and articles about Plutarch, Arrian, Thucydides and other authors, and his friendships and mentoring and collaborations extended around the world. There is an obituary online, with information about a service Tuesday 2/16 at 2:30 Eastern time that will have an online component, at https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newsobserver/obituary.aspx?n=philip-stadter&pid=197767979.

A longer statement from the Department about his life and work is forthcoming.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 02/17/2021 - 1:34pm by Erik Shell.
Women's Classical Caucus logo

The Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winners of its 2020–2021 Public Scholarship and Advocacy awards and to learn more about how their work is influencing our field. Over the next month, the SCS Blog will publish a three-part series of in-depth interviews by the WCC with the award winners, who discuss their work in strengthening communities within the field and introducing new audiences to Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/10/2021 - 10:11am by .

The Interplay of Spectacle in the Roman Arena

Call for Papers: An Undergraduate Research Conference hosted by the Texas Tech Classics Program

The Conference will be held virtually on April 17th, 2021.

Featuring respondents Dr. David Larmour (Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Classics at TTU) and Ms. Cait Mongrain (Doctoral candidate at Princeton, TTU MA ‘15, BA ‘12)

 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 02/08/2021 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

The Cathartic History Conference is a digital conference, free and open to the public, that aims to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The conference will take place over two days: Friday, February 26th, and Saturday, February 27th. We also invite everyone to join us on Friday, February 19th at 7:00 pm ET for a public lecture by Dr. John Garner on Aristotle's Poetics.

You can learn more at the conference's website here.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 02/03/2021 - 10:05am by Erik Shell.

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