In Memoriam: Julian Ward Jones, Jr.

(Provided by the department at William & Mary)

Chancellor Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies Julian Ward Jones Jr. passed away on August 28, 2021. He was born on July 11, 1930, at Essex County, Virginia and grew up in Fredericksburg. He graduated in 1948 from James Monroe High School as valedictorian. He read Latin at the University of Richmond. During the period 1953-1955, he served as a dental technician in the US Army at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and still found time to read Homer. He pursued a PhD in Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he met his wife, Liz, about whom he had written, “the most brilliant linguist I ever knew.” After two years of teaching at Ohio State University, he accepted a position as Associate Professor at William & Mary in the Department of Ancient Languages in 1961. In his long career at W&M, Professor Jones served as Chair of the Department for over ten years and was instrumental in revising its curriculum and renaming it as the Department of Classical Studies. He also served as the President of several important professional organizations, including the Classical Association of Virginia, the Southern Section of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, and the Mediterranean Society of America.

Professor Jones’ publications include two editions of medieval commentaries on Vergil's Aeneid, and many other works on Vergil and the legend of the sack of Troy over the course of his career.  He also edited and translated from the Latin documents for the Swem Library Special Collections that dealt with the early history of the College. As William & Mary has transitioned from a small liberal arts college to a leading liberal-arts university, Professor Jones remained a voice of conscience for the importance of teaching to our profession. Whether in advanced Latin classes, in the Greek and Roman history courses that he introduced to W&M, or in his perennially popular courses on Pompeii and Roman Britain, Professor Jones’ devotion to teaching and to his students has enriched the experience of thousands of William & Mary alumni and alumnae and has led to their lasting gratitude.

After 40 years of service, Professor Jones retired from full-time teaching at William and Mary in 2001, but his interest in classical scholarship remained strong and he continued his travels to ancient lands along with his wife, Elizabeth Jones, also a Classics Professor. He kept teaching about Roman Britain, Pompeii, and other topics for the College’s Christopher Wren Association. Upon his retirement, W&M students, alumni, and friends established an endowment for an annual lecture in his name, honoring his legacy in the Department of Classics in teaching, research, and service.

Professor Jones is survived by two sons, Gordon Bradford Jones of Falls Church, Virginia, and Douglas Ward Jones, of Williamsburg, Virginia; a daughter-in-law, Presie Supremo Jones, and two grandsons, Xavier Supremo Jones and Zachary Moreno Jones, all of Williamsburg. He was predeceased by his wife of fifty-four years, Elizabeth Frances Hunter Jones, and by his sister, Dorothy Irene Wilkerson.

Reflecting on his career at W&M, Professor Jones recently wrote for the Classical Studies alumni newsletter: “The principal charm [of W&M] was the succession of bright and eager students I taught. I would go to regional and national meetings, and professors from other schools would tell me that at last they were teaching a student who was being lured by some famous graduate program. I reflected that I had a student like that that in almost every advanced course I had taught at William & Mary. Needless to say, I, having retired a few years ago (2001), find myself longing for the good old days—days of engaged students and congenial colleagues.”

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LGBT Meets SPQR Logo

I wish that LGBT Meets SQPR had existed as I began my journey into Greco-Roman antiquity in high school. As a closeted gay youth, I was eager to find stories, experiences, and anecdotes that could help me understand my identity better and not feel quite so alone. Modern LGBTQIA+ youth seem to gravitate towards Classics for such resources and community-building. In a survey conducted by Hannah Clarke, young queer people indicated that their interest in Classics stemmed from the fact that “Classics remedies, to a certain extent, anxieties of feeling culturally temporary. [The survey respondents] describe the visibility of queer figures in Classics classes as providing a sort of temporal anchor, which proves that they are not the result of a trend, something that came about in the 70s, something that is having a moment and could potentially vanish once more.”

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 05/14/2021 - 10:06am by Daniel Libatique.

The 2021 season of the Digital Classicist London seminar is on the theme of world classics: we have put together a programme of speakers who are working with digital humanities and digital classics methods to the study of antiquity—whether language, corpora, archaeology—from across the world. All sessions are streamed live on Youtube, and will also be available to watch there afterwards.

All seminars at 17:00 (UK time).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 5:27pm by Erik Shell.

(Sent on behalf of Lawrence Kowerski)

Dear friends of the Classics Program at Hunter College,

Please join us Friday, May 14, at 5pm for the 83rd Josephine Earle Memorial Lecture (see the attached poster). The lecture is taking place virtually over Zoom, and pre-registration is required at the link below. In addition to the lecture, the event will begin with a student award ceremony and a celebration of recent graduates from the Classics Program at Hunter.

83rd Josephine Earle Memorial Lecture, Friday, May 14, 5-7pm

"What did the Romans want from their law?"

Michael Peachin, Professor of Classics (New York University)

Register at this link:

https://huntercollege.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwodu2prDwjHd0KuXntHJFFpwQ8YOY6WivN

(If the link doesn't take you to a registration screen when you click on it, please try cutting and pasting it manually into your browser. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.)

We hope to see many of you there!

Lawrence Kowerski
Associate Professor in Classics (Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 4:41pm by Erik Shell.
"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

THE WINNER OF THE 2020 LONDON HELLENIC PRIZE  -- PRESS RELEASE

The LHP adjudicating committee met by teleconference on May 7th to discuss the Shortlist of candidates for books published in 2020 and select the winner. The committee was chaired by A.G. Leventis Professor emeritus Paul Cartledge (Clare College, University of Cambridge) and also included Professor Peter Frankopan (Worcester College, Oxford), Mr Robin Lane Fox (New College, Oxford), Dr Nick Lowe (Royal Holloway, University of London), Professor emeritus Michael Paschalis (University of Crete), and Dr Jennifer Wallace (Peterhouse, University of Cambridge).

The five books shortlisted by the committee were:

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/11/2021 - 12:52pm by Erik Shell.

Statius – author of a coherent œuvre?

Newcastle University, 26-28 May 2022

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 05/10/2021 - 1:55pm by Erik Shell.

(A message from Dennis Looney, MLA)

I hope the semester/quarter is ending up well. Come celebrate at the 2021 MLA Leadership Institute: Why Humanities Now: https://www.adfl.mla.org/Seminars/MLA-Academic-Program-Services-Leadership-Institute-Why-Humanities-Now

In addition to a robust set of plenaries and discussion groups (full program is online), there are three workshops that will be of interest: one for chairs, one for directors of graduate studies, and one for department leaders interested in using data for advocacy. 

See below for brief descriptions.  Use the link above for access to the full program and registration.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/10/2021 - 10:14am by Erik Shell.

Wood and Ceramic: Introducing digital methods with Classics Library special collections

A public event of the ICS/Hellenic and Roman Library

Thursday July 1, 2021. 17:00 UK time/UTC+1

Free but booking required: https://ics.sas.ac.uk/events/event/24399

The Combined Classics Library holds over 150,000 volumes on Greco-Roman antiquity, including a number of special collections. One is the Wood Archive, a collection of diaries, notebooks, sketchbooks and published works relating to a tour of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Levant, made by between May 1750 and June 1751 by the classical scholar Robert Wood, the archaeologists John Bouverie (who died during the tour) and James Dawkins, and the draughtsman Giovanni Battista Borra. Another is the Ehrenberg Bequest, a collection of antiquities, mostly ceramics, bequeathed to the Institute of Classical Studies in 1976 by Victor Ehrenberg, on the understanding that the collection was to be used for teaching and handling.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/10/2021 - 6:29am by Erik Shell.

Guidelines for the 2021 Erich S. Gruen Prize have been updated.

The Erich S. Gruen Prize Committee invites all graduate students in North America to enter the second annual competition for the best graduate research paper on multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean. This year the prize will be a cash award of $500. 

The prize is intended to honor Erich S. Gruen, renowned ancient historian and long-time Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Gruen was born in Vienna in 1935 and came to the United States in 1939. One of the most respected and beloved scholars in the field, he has made lasting contributions to our understanding of ethnicity, identity, and exchange in the multicultural ancient Mediterranean world.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 05/07/2021 - 6:57am by Erik Shell.

Cartledge Title and Abstract

Learning from the Past: Classics and the Contemporary World

Prof. Paul Cartledge (University of Cambridge)

Tuesday May 25, 2021 at 5pm GMT

Abstract: This webinar explores contemporary political and social issues, including the nature of populism and authoritarianism and the treatment of disenfranchised groups, through the lens of ancient Athens and its extraordinary democracy with Prof. Paul Cartledge, emeritus A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at the University of Cambridge.

Paul Cartledge is a world-renowned Classicist and expert on ancient Greece, whose recent books include Democracy: A Life (2018) and Thebes: The Forgotten City of Ancient Greece (2020). In 2021, he received the Commander of the Order of Honor from the Greek government for enhancing the reputation of Greece abroad.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/03/2021 - 10:25am by Erik Shell.

The SCS, consistent with its Statement on Professional Ethics, which addresses discrimination and harassment on the basis of gender identity, stands fully in support of transgender classicists. It condemms any harassment and bullying of anyone who is transgender or who advocates for transgender rights.

approved by the SCS Board, 4/30/21

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Fri, 04/30/2021 - 12:52pm by Helen Cullyer.

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