In Memoriam: Lucy Turnbull

(From the University of Mississippi's website)

Former University of Mississippi professor Lucy Turnbull will always be remembered as a beloved educator who could make her curriculum both easy to understand and infinitely interesting to her students, a mentor and a champion of civil rights at Ole Miss.

Her enthusiasm for the classics was contagious, which propelled her students to success in her art history, archaeology, mythology and classical civilization courses. Turnbull, 87, of Oxford, joined the university faculty in 1961 and taught until 1990. She died Sunday (April 21).

Dewey Knight, recently retired UM associate director of the Center for Student Success and First-Year Experience, was one of Turnbull’s friends. He entered the university as a freshman in 1966 and found himself in one of her classes that year.

“She walked into the classroom that first day,” Knight said. “There were about 25 of us, and we were immediately very afraid of Professor Turnbull. She was incredibly intelligent. She could read Greek like we read English.

“We all were in fear of her, but we had the ultimate respect for her, because it was very obvious she was brilliant.”

Services for Turnbull are set for 11 a.m. Friday (April 26) at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Oxford. A visitation will precede the service starting at 9 a.m. in the church’s Parish Hall.

Knight calls his former professor “one of the most important change agents” in the university’s history. Her biographical bullet points support that claim.

Born in Lancaster, Ohio, Turnbull earned a bachelor’s degree from Bryn Mawr College and her master’s and doctoral degrees from Radcliffe. She was a John Williams White Fellow and Charles Eliot Norton Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. She was the author of many scholarly articles and contributed to books, mainly in the areas of Greek vase painting, mythology and poetry.

After holding positions as a museum assistant at Wellesley College and Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, she joined the UM classics faculty in 1961, as a classical archaeologist.

“Teaching is very energizing, but I didn’t really understand that at the time,” she later recalled. “When you’re teaching, you’re giving something to the students, but they’re also giving back to you. I enjoyed it very much.”

Turnbull was active in the integration of Ole Miss in 1962, when James Meredith became the first black student to enroll at the university. She, as a relatively new faculty member, was among the professors who vocally supported Meredith pursuing his education at the university.

Provost Emeritus Gerald Walton, who joined the UM faculty in 1962, later recalled that the professors who supported integration as part of the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors held formal meetings. Turnbull was elected the group’s secretary.

“Those of us who supported integration became a kind of fraternal group and talked among ourselves a good deal,” Walton said in 2012. “It was good to learn that Lucy was one who did not mind speaking her mind even though we weren’t sure in those days how such people as board of trustees members or legislators – or members of the Ole Miss administration, for that matter – might act. Lucy was a brave woman.”

Meredith often found himself alone on campus. Knight remembers seeing a photo of his friend Turnbull having lunch in Johnson Commons with Meredith and UM professor James Silver, author of “Mississippi: The Closed Society,” surrounded by a sea of empty tables.

She also was an active member of the American Civil Liberties Union, Common Cause, Mississippi Council on Human Relations, National Geographic Society, Smithsonian Associates and the National Organization of Women, among other groups.

Turnbull helped establish the University Museum and served as its director toward the end of her career, from 1983 to 1990. Its opening was one of her favorite memories, as the Department of Classics‘ large collection of Greek and Roman antiquities was moved from Bondurant Hall to the museum, where they remain.

Turnbull’s classroom presence had a lasting effect on Knight, he said. The two became friends, and for 20 years, beginning in 1996, they jointly taught a Sunday school class at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, where Turnbull was a devoted member who will be memorialized there Friday.

Knight and his wife, Theresa, also were among those invited to “The Christmas Party” at Turnbull’s house each year, where she lived alone, having never married.

The parties, which Knight said she hosted for nearly 50 years, included a who’s who of the university’s liberal arts community and ornaments that Turnbull made by hand.

“The first time we got the invitation, it just said ‘The Christmas Party,’” Knight said. “We didn’t know what was happening. We finally ultimately realized it was a big event, and if you were invited to her house, you felt special.”

He will always remember Turnbull as one of the most important figures in the university’s history and a fierce advocate for the liberal arts education.

“I never met anybody who didn’t like Lucy,” Knight said. “She was just a really special person who was very opinionated and very principled. Even if you didn’t agree with her, you liked her.

“She was an unwavering force. She was a scholar, but she was also a quality person. She made the university better by being a part of it.”

---

(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   

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Applications are now being accepted for PhD students in Analysis and Management of Cultural Heritage (AMCH) for the 2015/16 PhD program at IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca (www.imtlucca.it).  Highly motivated candidates are invited to apply for one of the 35 fully-funded scholarships of the three-year doctoral program, which is articulated in curricula. The 3 curricula currently offered are field-specific, although in many instances they share a common scientific background.

The AMCH curriculum proposes courses in Management of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Institutions, European and International Legislation on Cultural Heritage and Landscape, Art History, Museology, Technologies applied to the valorization of Cultural Heritage. Both research oriented and practice oriented courses constitute the program, which aims at educating qualified professionals operating in the concrete field of cultural management and academics.  It promotes research offering the students a lively contact with different research approaches and methodologies, through case studies belonging to research fields such as Art History, Classical Archaeology and Museology.

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Thu, 04/23/2015 - 1:38pm by Adam Blistein.

The proposed collection of essays, Classical New York: Greece and Rome in New York City’s Art & Architecture, 1830-1940, will fill a notable gap among the many books on New York’s art and architecture. As the quintessentially modern metropolis, New York City is often defined by the skyscrapers that dominate its skyline, a camera-ready subject for myriad trade books. Easily overlooked—and virtually ignored by scholars —is the formative influence of Greco-Roman art and architecture on the buildings and public monuments of New York from the height of the Greek revival style in the 1830s into the 1930s, when, for example, the sculptural program at Rockefeller Center recast classical myth in a notably modern form. During the century or so covered by the volume, New Yorkers repeatedly looked to the classical past for knowledge and inspiration in seeking out new ways to cultivate a civic identity, to design their buildings and monuments, and to structure their public and private spaces. The essays collected here will address discrete aspects of the influence of Greece and Rome on the development of New York City over the course of the nineteenth and into the twentieth century. 

At present, the proposed volume will include the following papers:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 04/17/2015 - 11:30am by Information Architect.

California Classical Studies, a peer-reviewed open-access venue for long-format scholarship, is pleased to announce its next two forthcoming volumes and to invite English-language submissions, especially in the areas of papyrology, epigraphy, archaeology, and studies of textual tradition. No affiliation with the University of California is required for publication in the series.

Forthcoming summer 2015: Mark Griffith, Greek Satyr Play: Five Studies [CCS, Number 3]. With a new introduction and some revisions, these essays on Classical Greek satyr plays, originally published in various venues between 2002 and 2010, suggest new critical approaches to this dramatic genre and identify previously neglected dimensions and dynamics in these plays within their original Athenian context.

Forthcoming late 2015: Mirjam Kotwick, Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Text of Aristotle’s Metaphysics [CCS, Number 4]. Based on the author’s 2014 Munich dissertation, this study offers a new appraisal of the ancient tradition of the Metaphysics, demonstrating what uses can be made of Alexander’s commentary to learn about that tradition and how the commentary may have influenced the tradition of the philosophical text itself.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 04/17/2015 - 11:04am by Information Architect.

Hans Beck, McGill University, has won the Anneliese Maier Research Award 2015. The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation has selected eleven researchers from outside of Germany to receive this year’s prize. Each award is valued at 250,000 Euros and is granted annually to outstanding humanities scholars and social scientists. It is designated to finance research collaboration over a period of up to five years with specialist colleagues in Germany. The 11 award winners were selected from a total of 72 nominees from 22 countries.

D. Mark Possanza, University of Pittsburgh, will be the 2015-16 Frank H. Kenan Fellow at the National Humanities Center; his project is Fragmentary Republican Latin, vol. VIII, “Lyric, Elegiac and Hexameter Poetry” which will be published in the Loeb Classical Library.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:53pm by Adam Blistein.

The Department of Classical Studies at the University of Missouri invites abstract submissions for a conference on sound and auditory culture in Greco-Roman antiquity to be held in Columbia, MO on April 1-2, 2016. Keynote addresses will be delivered by Pauline LeVen (Yale), Shane Butler (Johns Hopkins), and Timothy Power (Rutgers).

This conference aims to convene a community of scholars with active or nascent interests in sound and auditory culture in antiquity, in order to document current work and explore avenues for future research. To that end, we welcome proposals for 20-30 minute presentation reporting on research relating to sound, auditory culture, or auditory experience in all aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman culture.

Submissions, comprising a 200-350 word abstract and a CV, should be sent to gurds@missouri.edu by July 1, 2015.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/15/2015 - 4:42pm by Adam Blistein.

The University of Crete will host the conference, The Emotion of Hope in Ancient Literature, History and Art on December 11-13, 2015. This conference seeks to shed light on the complex emotion of hope in ancient Greek and Latin literature, history, and art and trace the development of its ambiguous nature across different times, cultural contexts and genres. At the same time, the conference seeks to raise questions concerning the place of hope in the history of emotions. Please submit abstracts (300-350 words) to both George Kazantzidis (kazanbile@gmail.com) and Dimos Spatharas (spatharasd@gmail.com) by May 25, 2015.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/15/2015 - 4:39pm by Adam Blistein.

The Interdisciplinary Center for Aristotle Studies of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki will hold the World Congress “Aristotle 2400 Years” in celebration of the 2400th anniversary of Aristotle’s birth on May 23-28, 2016.  Scholars interested in presenting a paper at the Conference are invited to submit their paper in English (3.500 words (footnotes and bibliography not included) and an abstract (200 words) in English by September 15, 2015.

Technical details for submission of papers will be provided soon on the website of the Congress:  http://aristotleworldcongress2016.web.auth.gr/?q=el Papers may be presented either in English or in Greek.

It would be very helpful if those who intend to submit a paper could let us know in advance (up to May 31, 2015) the tentative title of their paper and to which thematic area they intend to address. Please send this information to Professor Demetra Sfendoni-Mentzou: sfendoni@edlit.auth.gr

Applicants will be informed by December 31, 2015 about their acceptance. The most challenging papers will be considered for one of the Plenary Sessions.
There will be a conference fee (to be announced), and attendants are encouraged to find financial support from their own institutions. Early subscription will be possible until January 31, 2016.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/15/2015 - 4:37pm by Adam Blistein.

Dear Colleagues,

In this, my first presidential letter, I want to begin by acknowledging the singular honor of being elected to this office by you, the members. My predecessors have set a high standard and I hope not to fall short of their distinguished example. I thank especially my immediate predecessors, Denis Feeney and Kathryn Gutzwiller, for all the help they have given me as I assume this role, and for the leadership they have shown as the Society has moved forward to take on new roles and new challenges.

In this context, I write to inform you of an exciting new initiative by the Board and to encourage those of you who are interested to volunteer for service.

In an effort to be in better communication with members and to hear the interests and concerns of members less well represented in the past, the Society is creating four new advisory groups: one for non-tenure track faculty, including adjuncts, part-timers, and those with temporary appointments; one for primary and secondary school teachers; one for independent scholars; and one for graduate students. A member of the Board of Directors will coordinate the efforts of each group but the Board member’s task will be simply to facilitate communication with the Board; the coordinator will neither set an agenda nor direct the discussion. It is our hope that these groups will help the Society to represent better all of its members.

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Fri, 04/10/2015 - 2:47pm by .

The University of Notre Dame will hold a conference on the reception of classical literature in performance genres on October 30-31, 2015. Graduate students are invited to submit abstracts for a two-day conference on the reception of classical literature in the context of performance genres. Greek and Roman mythology, ideas, and literature pervade Western culture and are inextricably tied to the intellectual history of our music, dance, theater, film, and all other performance genres.

Please email an abstract (in Word or PDF format) of no more than 375 words to Sean Kelly (skelly16@nd.edu). Include a tentative title for your paper, as well as, separately, your name, institutional affiliation, and email address.  In your abstract, include a clear summary of your argument, with one or two persuasive examples, and an indication of how your paper would contribute to critical reflection on the topic as a whole.  Your argument should be accessible to an audience of scholars from various disciplines.  If you have any technical requirements for your presentation, please note those clearly.  Papers should be 20 minutes in length. The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2015.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/02/2015 - 4:50pm by Adam Blistein.

The University of Graz will hold an international symposium dedicated to ancient Arcadia and its historical, demographical and cultural peculiarities on February 11-12, 2016. We would like to invite all colleagues working in the field of Archaeology, Ancient History, Classical Philology or Linguistics to participate in this meeting and to contribute by sending us papers. Please submit your registration form together with a short abstract (200 words) no later than May 29, 2015 to michaela.zinko@uni-graz.at.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/02/2015 - 4:48pm by Adam Blistein.

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