In Memoriam: Philip Levine

Philip Levine

September 8, 1922 - November 25, 2018

Dr. Philip Levine died at age 96 on Sunday, November 25, 2018. Born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1961 where he resided for the rest of his life. He leaves behind two sons, Jared and Dr. Harlan, who were his biggest source of pride, and four grandchildren, Zoe, Zachary, Hannah and Zane, who were a source of joy later in life.

His college years were interrupted by his nearly three years of service in Military lntelligence for the U.S.  Army, including time in Germany as an interrogator. He was a proud member of Harvard Colleges class of 1944(46), where he received his bachelor's degree, and where he went on to receive a Masters and Ph.D. in Classics. He held professor roles at Harvard College, University of Texas and UCLA. The majority of his career was at UCLA where he served as chairman of the Department of Classics and then as the Dean of Humanities. He had numerous academic achievements: Phi Beta Kappa at Harvard, the Bromberg Award for Humanities, an honorary Doctor of Hebrew Letters from the University of Judaism; he was a Sheldon Fellow in the Classics, a Fulbright Research Scholar, a Guggenheim Scholar and John and Penelope Biggs Resident in the Classics at Washington University. Twice he studied in Rome and was honored as a Cavaliere dell'Ordine al Merito della Republica ltaliana. ln retirement he was very active at UCLA. enjoying his 'blissful state of emeritude' while dining and talking with colleagues at the Faculty Center and serving on several committees. He was named Emeritus of the Year in 1998.

He is pre-deceased by his loving wife of 32 years, Dinnie. He was a devoted husband, father and grandfather and will be missed. ln lieu of flowers, donations in his name can be made to City of Hope at https://ourhope.cityofhope.org/philiplevine or by check, payable to City of Hope, rnailed to City of Hope, Office of Philanthropy, 1500 E. Duarte Rd. Duarte CA 91010 (memo line: ln memory of Philip Levine), or toll-free at 866-683-HOPE(4673).

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Seneca 2020. International Conference

What more can we say about Seneca?

The Centre for Classical Studies of the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon is organizing an International Conference on Seneca to promote and encourage a critical reflection on the permanence of themes, values, perspectives and representations of Seneca’s works in Western literature and culture.

The Conference will take place between 14-17 December 2020, and, through the interdisciplinary debate of the contribution given by the experiences of researchers from different fields of study, it aims:

- to think of how Seneca became one of the most prominent figures in Western culture;

- to consider, examine and reflect on our current knowledge about Seneca, his life and works;

- to explore new study angles and what remains to be said about Seneca in the Twenty-First Century, in light of the renewed interest shown in his works.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

António Pedro Mesquita (University of Lisbon)

Alessandro Schiesaro (University of Manchester)

Catharine Edwards (University of Cambridge)

Gareth David Williams (Columbia University)

Chiara Torre (University of Milan)

Jesús Luque Moreno (University of Granada)

José Pedro Serra (University of Lisbon)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 07/18/2019 - 2:54pm by Erik Shell.

“Performing Texts”
Network for the Study of Archaic and Classical Greek Song
6th Open Conference, July 1-5, 2020, Spetses, Greece

 

Gregory Nagy (Classics, Harvard University) announces the 6th Open Conference, which is organized by Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC (CHS DC) on behalf of the Network for the Study of Archaic and Classical Greek Song. The organization of the Conference will be administratively and logistically supported by Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece (CHS Greece).

The conference will take place on the island of Spetses in Greece from July 1 to July 5, 2020. The topic of the conference is "Performing Texts."

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 07/18/2019 - 11:03am by Erik Shell.

Justin Slocum Bailey will give a two-day series of workshops, BRINGING LATIN TO LIFE IN THE CLASSROOM, in Syracuse on Sept. 20-21, hosted by SU and generously supported by Binghamton University, Le Moyne College, The Humanities Corridor (and others).

Justin will help explore new and interactive techniques of Latin instruction. His pedagogy has proved to be very fruitful on all levels of Latin language classrooms (high school, college, etc.). Please consider attending and help spread the word.

Registration is $40 for one day, $75 for both: this will help cover a at least the lunches and refreshments. Students can attend for free. If the fee is an impediment to participation, we can offer a reduction.

Tina Chronopoulos (tchronop@binghamton.edu) and I will be happy to learn if you want to attend and to hear any suggestions.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 07/17/2019 - 10:20am by Erik Shell.
Phoenicians, Philistines, and Canaanites: The Levant and the Classical World (Villa)
2020/2021

The Getty Scholars Program at the Villa for the 2020/2021 term will focus on the ancient cultures of the Levant and their relations with the classical world. Lying on the eastern seaboard of the Mediterranean, the Levant was a crucial crossroads between the classical world of Greece and Rome and the kingdoms of the Near East. Home to the ancient peoples of Phoenicia, Ugarit, Canaan, Philistia, Jordan, Israel, and Judah, this region participated in a vibrant Bronze-Age network of trade that flourished for many centuries until a combination of warfare, migration and famine around 1200 BCE destroyed these palace societies.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/17/2019 - 9:38am by Erik Shell.

Central: February 26-29, 2020, Palmer House Hilton Chicago

Pacific: April 8-11, 2020, Westin St Francis, San Francisco
 

This is a call for submissions of papers to be presented to the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy.

The Deadline for Submission of papers is August 1.

a) To have your paper considered, you need to be a member of the Society for 2019/20 - a form is attached, and it needs to come back via regular mail, not as an attachment!

b) You should submit your paper as an attachment to an email addressed to apreus@binghamton.edu. Your email message is your cover letter; it should include your name, address, academic affiliation (as of 2019/20), and the title of the paper. Note if you would prefer the Central or Pacific Division, or either! The paper itself should be prepared for blind (anonymous) review, and IT MUST BE IN DOC, DOCX, OR RTF FORMAT! NOT PDF! Papers may include "real Greek" if it is in a Unicode font.

The Program Committee has decided that authors who had a paper accepted by the Society for presentation at a meeting of the American Philosophical Association or the Society for Classical Studies during the past year should not be considered.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 07/17/2019 - 9:25am by Erik Shell.
Yearly maintenance on the Placement Service is now complete. There will be a Newsletter later this month detailing the final jobs report and the changes made to the service over these past two weeks.
 
Anyone hoping to receive job announcements and other benefits of the AIA/SCS Placement Service will need to sign up for this new academic year. Here is a tutorial on how to do so: https://youtu.be/zr7gTIUdqiQ. The price will remain free for AIA and SCS members, and will continue to be $55 for non-members.
 
We are also excited to announce our newest publication: "Careers for Classicists: Graduate Student Edition." Building on the last version, which was published in 2012, this guide provides updated, modernized, and detailed advice for graduate students seeking jobs both inside and outside the classroom.
 
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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 07/16/2019 - 10:53am by Erik Shell.

Upon a recommendation by the Society for Classical Studies, FIEC has approved a statement on the format of abstracts and keywords for the submission of articles

FIEC STATEMENT

L’Année Philologique is the main database for publications in Classical studies. In the interest of all scholars, authors and researchers, it seems important to define some basic requirements that will make it easier for the local branches of L’Année Philologique to analyze the entries. The following is a recommendation made to all associations of Classical studies affiliated to FIEC. Associations are kindly asked to circulate this statement among their members. In view of the ever-growing number of articles and chapters in collective volumes processed for registration by L’Année Philologique, and in order to reduce the amount of work required of the various branches of L’Année Philologique, it is recommended that journal and volume editors regard it as a best practice of the efficient analysis of the data that each article or chapter be accompanied by a brief abstract and a list of keywords. To ensure the utility of abstracts and keywords for the efficient analysis of data for L’Année Philologique, please take note of the following guidelines:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 07/12/2019 - 2:47pm by Helen Cullyer.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities all over the US and Canada with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from children’s programs to teaching Latin in a prison. In this post we focus on two programs that bring the study of Greek and Roman antiquity to two traditionally underserved communities: incarcerated students in a correctional facility and the racially, ethnically, and economically diverse community in Winnipeg, Canada.

There is a pressing need to make Classics more open and inclusive, and to diversify the voices dominating the study of Greek and Roman antiquity. A growing number of classicists are rethinking the field's often unspoken assumptions, exploring the ways in which contemporary scholarship may be affirming or challenging existing social structures, and reaching out to more diverse audiences, to encourage new responses and perspectives. 

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 07/10/2019 - 4:20pm by Nina Papathanasopoulou.

Classical Studies in the 21st Century: More Relevant Than Ever

The AIA-SCS joint ad hoc committee on the future of classics and archaeology met earlier this year to discuss pressures common to both fields. The group agreed to create a document that can be used to remind college and university administrators of what we do and our relevance. The joint statement entitled “Classical Studies in the 21st Century: More Relevant Than Ever,” is below and also available as a PDF download. Department chairs and other departmental members are welcome to use it as talking points with decision-makers at your institutions, be they chairs, deans, provosts, chancellors and some other administrator, as a reminder of the continuing and important benefits of our fields. You may use the entire statement or customize it to meet the specific needs of your department and profile of your institution. We realize that there are many successful advocacy strategies, and we hope this brief statement will join them. If you have already successfully advocated to preserve or expand your department, let us know what worked.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 07/10/2019 - 11:46am by Helen Cullyer.

FIEC resolution towards supporting the registration of Ancient Greek and Latin in the UNESCO List of Intangible Cultural Heritage

(approved by the FIEC General Assembly of Delegates, London July 4th, 2019)

The International Federation of Associations of Classical Studies (FIEC) supports the registration of Ancient Greek and Latin in the UNESCO List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Those two languages have had a deep impact on the Mediterranean area (in a wide sense) over several millenia; this impact is still to be felt very strongly today, not only in that area, but also in the world at large.

Ancient Greek was the main language spoken and written in Archaic and Classical Greece, as well as in the whole Eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic period till the end of the Byzantine period. In contact with other languages (notably Semitic languages and Latin), it has gradually evolved without changing its basic structure, to become Modern Greek. Latin started in the Italic peninsula and, as Roman power extended over the centuries, has spread to most areas of present-day Europe, where it evolved to produce the Romance languages. Through the process of colonization, Latin has also spread to other parts of the world, notably the Americas.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 07/05/2019 - 2:46pm by Helen Cullyer.

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