New Program: BA in Archaeology, History, and Literature of Ancient Greece

“BA Program in the Archaeology, History, and Literature of Ancient Greece”

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Online applications:  https://baag.uoa.gr/application
Email for inquiriesinfo@baag.uoa.gr

Τhe new “BA Program in the Archaeology, History, and Literature of Ancient Greece”, is the first English-taught Bachelor's degree program at a Greek University and it combines the disciplines of archaeology, ancient history and ancient Greek literature in a unique synthesis.
The program’s curriculum covers all aspects of Ancient Greek Studies, tailored for a global audience with an interest in Classical culture.  It is based on a carefully designed combination of instruction in the classroom and instruction on-site, with frequent visits to archaeological sites and other locations of cultural interest.

Applications are now open for the academic year 2020/2021.
Prospective students around the world have already expressed their interest to apply for admission.
The program is addressed exclusively to prospective University students from countries outside the European Union. 
Non-EU University students are also invited to join this BA Program for one-academic-year-study and to be introduced into archaeology, history, ancient Greek literature and art, Aegean civilizations, etc. 

Modern Greek language courses are available at the Modern Greek Language Teaching Center

The BA program is offered by a historical University and the School of Philosophy of the NKUA, with a tradition that exceeds 180 years of ongoing activity and strong presence in the area of Higher Education—both the University and the School are consistently highly ranked in international university rankings.

The Program at a Glance

Τitle: “BA Program in the Archaeology, History, and Literature of Ancient Greece”;

  • It focuses on Greek antiquity and awards a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts (BA);

Application deadline: 31 March 2020

Late applications considered up to 30 June 2020

Apply Now

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Directed by Christopher Bungard

Erin Moodie translator 

The Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) presents a script-in-hand reading of a new translation by Erin Moodie of Terence’s Phormio. The African born Terence often gets short shrift when it comes to ancient drama, but he is tremendously influential in the history of western theatre.  

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Sun, 08/07/2022 - 1:45pm by Helen Cullyer.
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This is Part 3 of a three-part series. Find Part 1 and Part 2 here.

There is nothing ideologically neutral about grades, and there is nothing ideologically neutral about the idea that we can neatly and tidily do away with grades. We can't simply take away grades without re-examining all of our pedagogical approaches, and this work looks different for each teacher, in each context, and with each group of students.

— Jesse Stommel, “Grades are Dehumanizing

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/01/2022 - 3:33pm by .

The following obituary is reposted from legacy.com.

You can read the original posting at this link.

"We collectively mourn the loss of Dr. Corinne Ondine Pache, Professor of Classical Studies and a cherished member of the Trinity University community, who ended her battle with cancer on July 20, 2022. Corinne was an accomplished scholar, revered teacher and mentor, and terrific friend to many all over the globe. She will be sorely missed.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 07/27/2022 - 2:19pm by .
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This is Part 2 of a three-part series. Find Part 1 and Part 3 here.

Only by abandoning traditional grading and performance assessment practices can we achieve our ultimate educational objectives.

Alfie Kohn

Tradition in Classics is powerful. When the three of us started teaching as graduate students, we drew on our experiences as undergraduates in the many Classics courses we had taken, particularly when it came to assessing students. This is not a bad thing! We all need to start somewhere while we are growing as educators. Nevertheless, it was difficult for us to imagine, for instance, teaching Latin without traditional assessment practices (such as high-stakes tests), because that’s how we were taught.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/25/2022 - 10:03am by .

The National Humanities Center invites applications for academic-year or one-semester residential fellowships. Mid-career, senior, and emerging scholars from all areas of the humanities with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are encouraged to apply. Scholars from all parts of the globe are eligible; stipends and travel expenses are provided. Fellowship applicants must have a PhD or equivalent scholarly credentials. Fellowships are supported by the Center’s own endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Located in the vibrant Research Triangle region of North Carolina, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. Fellows enjoy private studies, in-house dining, and superb library services that deliver all research materials.

Applications and all accompanying materials are due by 11:59 p.m. EDT, October 6, 2022.
 

For more information and to apply, please visit:
https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/become-a-fellow/.
 

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/20/2022 - 10:27am by .
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This is Part 1 of a three-part series. Find Part 2 and Part 3 here.

Picture a student getting back a graded essay or exam. They glance at the letter or number at the top of the page and throw the paper in the recycling on their way out the door without reading the feedback, even when you think it will help them succeed on the next major assignment.

Imagine being consistently impressed by a student’s in-class work. Their insights and positive attitude contribute significantly to the learning environment. However, they do very poorly on the first major assessment, a midterm exam. Both of you are surprised and dismayed, and the student is discouraged.

Consider grading a batch of assignments. Looking at your rubric, you are struggling with the difference between an A– and a B+ for a few essays. You put them down to look at later.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/18/2022 - 11:01am by .

Applications are available now online for the 2023/2024 Residential Grants and Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute in the following competitions:

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Applicants are invited to address one of the following future themes:

Art and Technology (Research Institute)

2023/2024

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/13/2022 - 10:22am by .
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At the end of every year, the National Language Resources Monitoring and Research Center in mainland China, an organization affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education, publishes a list of the most popular online words and phrases of the year. One entry in the 2021 list is tǎng píng (躺平), or “lying flat.” “Lying flat” denotes a posture both physical and political. It is a rejection of the “996” (9am–9pm, 6 days a week) work culture prevalent among China’s younger population. It is also a silent protest to widening income disparity, exorbitant housing costs in major cities, and the myth of a middle-class life.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 07/11/2022 - 2:47pm by .

The International Plato Society’s Symposium XIII will take place at the University of Georgia July 18-22.  The Symposium is entirely devoted to Plato’s Sophist.  It is hybrid with all papers simultaneously broadcast on Zoom.  A copy of the program is available on our site, Platosociety.org.

Remote and in-person registration are also available on our site.  You must be signed into the site in order to register.  Then, when you click on the “Register” button, are taken to a secure site at the University of Georgia.  Registration includes a copy of the published volume of selected papers.  All who are registered will be sent Zoom links on the morning on July 18.  Many of the papers that will be presented are posted and accessible to those who register.

If you have difficulties registering, try a different browser.  If that doesn’t work, contact us at webmaster@platosociety.org.

Athens, Georgia, the home of the University of Georgia, is quite a nice place, and we have arranged receptions every evening and a brief excursion.  Most of all, we have an excellent set of papers.

For more details and information click the link below:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 2:13pm by .
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This is a two-part blog post reflecting upon AAPI experiences in classical studies. Part 1 reflected upon the author’s personal experience teaching race & ethnicity in antiquity in the context of the ongoing surge of anti-Asian violence in the country. Part 2 reflects upon the shared experiences of students and scholars of Asian descent in classical studies through a series of interviews.

Curious about whether other people of Asian descent in Classical Studies have had experiences similar to mine and how that affects our lives in the field, I reached out this spring to scholars and students from other institutions in North America, public and private, large and small, through the recently formed Asian & Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/08/2022 - 12:56pm by .

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The following obituary is reposted from legacy.com.
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The National Humanities Center invites applications for academic-year or one-

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