Pending Tax Legislation and Graduate Student Tuition

Early on Saturday morning, the US Senate passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Given that the House passed its version of the tax bill on November 16, the House and Senate will now choose members for a conference committee to reconcile the two versions of the bill. 

The House bill contains a provision that would make tuition waivers for graduate students subject to income tax, increasing the tax liability of hundreds of thousands of graduate students, including Classics graduate students at US institutions. The Senate bill, however, retains the tax exemption for graduate tuition student waivers. Many organizations and individuals are already advocating vocally for that exemption to be included in the reconciled tax bill. 

The SCS, along with many other scholarly societies, issued this statement on the proposed tax legislation last week. The National Humanities Alliance, of which SCS is a member, has now issued this action alert and is making it easy for individuals in the US to contact their representatives in Congress in order to voice their concerns. 

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.
Microphone

Multiple proponents of Spoken Latin in the classroom - Edward Zarrow, Tom Morris, and Jason Pedicone - were recently featured on the "America the Bilingual" podcast.

"How has a presumably dead language become such a disruptor? Because Latin certainly seems to be just that. It’s one of the most frequently taught languages in American schools."

You can listen to the podcast in-browser here: http://www.americathebilingual.com/in-case-you-thought-latin-was-dead/

---

(Photo: "Audio Bokeh" by Alan Levine, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/08/2018 - 2:06pm by Erik Shell.

This is a reminder for upcoming deadlines for SCS Awards and Prizes. Follow the linked URLs for more information on the nomination materials and the prizes themselves.

Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level: June 1, 2018

SCS Outreach Prize: September 14, 2018

Excellence in Teaching at the Precollegiate Level: October 2, 2018

---

(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 05/07/2018 - 12:31pm by Erik Shell.
Composite RGB image of manuscript E3, Escorialensis 291 (Υ.i.1): overview of folio 32 recto Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Homer Multitext (HMT) has something in common with the poetry it documents: They are both monumental and impressive works whose gradual evolution over many years by many hands has left traces of its past; it exists in several forms that present the same information in slightly different ways, and its development through changing technologies has left occasional redundancies. Like the Iliad, it lives up to its title, but perhaps not in the way one expects. And like its poetic source text, it richly rewards those who plumb its depths.

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 05/06/2018 - 1:02pm by Bill Beck.

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South recently put out a call for action concerning the proposed discontinuation of the Classics program at the University of Montana.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/04/2018 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.
Portrait of an elderly Roman matron (40-20 BCE, Image via the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, CC0 License).

I am a professional hairdresser with a BA degree in Drama. My only other significant job experience was a brief career in Academic Computer Database Administration in the 1980s, managing the Dartmouth Dante Project. I have no formal training in Archaeology or Classics, except for my dismal performance in high school Latin — but somehow this didn’t prevent me from becoming the authority on technical recreation of ancient Roman hairstyles.

I am a textbook case of doing things backwards: my topic found me. A chance encounter with a statue of Julia Domna at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore where I live, set me on the path of scholarship. The Walters had set this portrait out in the middle of the room where I could see the back of her head. At first I saw just a pretty updo I could sell to brides. But I failed completely when I tried to recreate it using modern, U-shaped wire hairpins. As I searched for information about how these styles were constructed, I found my professional hairdressing expertise at odds with canonical explanations of ancient Roman hairstyles—they all agreed that they were impossible without wigs and false hair.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 05/02/2018 - 4:26pm by Janet Stephens.

The deadline for members to volunteer for SCS committees and leadership positions is today, May 2nd.

These positions include many current SCS committees including the curriculum and preparation for a variety of teaching, research, and other careers. Descriptions of various positions and offices can be found here.

To volunteer, you can fill out the form linked on the Members Only page of our website. You must log in to the site to access this page. Appointed committee members will begin their terms in 2019.  Most elected offices will begin in 2020. 

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 05/02/2018 - 9:55am by Erik Shell.

Ἀρχή and origo: The Power of Origins

(Newcastle University, 2-4 May, 2019)

Origins have a particular power. Arguments referring back to the first beginnings and relating them to the present tend to be especially attractive. When we’re in a new place or confronted with new phenomena, we have a natural urge to learn about their origins. Stories of this kind – the so-called aitia – can convey a sense of education, of venerable antiquity, of continuity, of religious awe, or they can just be entertaining. In any case, they are as prominent nowadays as they were in antiquity.  

In this interdisciplinary conference we want to shed light on the fascination with origins from different perspectives: how is the power of origins employed in historiography, in literature ancient and modern, in art, in religious contexts, in philosophy, or in political debate? We are interested in exploring a wide range of case studies, in order to reflect on our overarching question: what is it that holds the different forms of aitia together? How can we understand this phenomenon in general terms? What is it that makes the origin such a fascinating and powerful form of discourse? 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/30/2018 - 2:33pm by Erik Shell.

The Classics Graduate Forum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is seeking papers for a graduate colloquium entitled “Constructing Identity in the Ancient World.” The colloquium will take place on October 26-27, 2018 and will feature a keynote address by Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer (University of Chicago). Submissions from all disciplines and approaches are encouraged, and we invite you to pass the attached Call for Papers along to all graduate students and departments that may be interested.

Abstract submissions are due June 1, 2018 and should be submitted to uwclassics.colloquium@gmail.com (see the CfP for guidelines). Any questions can be directed to the same email address or to amy.hendricks@wisc.edu.

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/30/2018 - 12:27pm by Erik Shell.
3rd c. CE Palmyrene Funerary Inscription and Bust from the Princeton Museum of Art (Photo by Sarah E. Bond).

How can digital humanities projects within the field of Classics preserve and allow public access to endangered materials? The Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project (WPAIP) is already addressing theses question head-on. WPAIP is a digital humanities project housed at the Digital Collections of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and established by Jeremy M. Hutton. Similar to the Palmyra Portrait Project of Aarhus University in Denmark, which works to collate and digitize Palmyrene portraiture, the primary goal of WPAIP is to collate and digitize Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions. This allows researchers to then analyze the language of Palmyrene Aramaic, the development and variations of its script, and other features.

Though these inscriptions are usually from the ancient city of Palmyra, they can also be found throughout the ancient Roman world, including Roman Britain and in the city of Rome itself. In fact, some feature bilingual and trilingual inscriptions with Latin and Greek texts that range from funerary inscriptions to dedicatory altars.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 04/27/2018 - 7:37am by Catherine Bonesho.

“Constructing Identity in the Ancient World”

Madison, WI: October 26-27, 2018

8th Annual Graduate Colloquium

Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Keynote presentation by

Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer

Helen A. Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor of Classics and the Program in Gender Studies

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/25/2018 - 11:55am by Helen Cullyer.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Calls for Papers
SCS Announcements
(From the National Humanities Alliance)
Classics in the News

© 2018, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy