Proposal for Change in By-Laws

At its meeting in September 2011, the Board of Directors voted to recommend to the members that they change the By-Laws to combine the existing divisions of Publications and Research, effective January 6, 2013.  Members will be asked to vote on this change at the Annual Meeting of Members on January 8, 2012, in Philadelphia.

Current By-Law language with proposed deletions struck through and proposed additions [in brackets].

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

13.  The Board of Directors shall consist of the President, President-Elect, six[five] Vice Presidents, two Financial Trustees, six additional Directors, and Immediate Past President.  In addition, the Executive Director shall be a member of the Board of Directors with voice but without vote.  Except as may be provided otherwise by law, any Director or the entire Board of Directors may be removed, with or without cause, by a majority of the members then entitled to vote in an election duly called for that purpose.

The Officers of the Association shall be a President, a President-Elect, a Past President, six[five] Vice Presidents (one each for Education, Outreach, Professional Matters, Program, [and] Publications and Research), and an Executive Director.  The Executive Director shall serve as the Secretary of the Association.  In addition, there shall be two Financial Trustees and six additional Directors.  The term of the President is one year; the President shall not be immediately re-elected as President-Elect or Director.  The President-Elect shall be elected on nomination by the Nominating Committee or by petition and shall succeed thereafter to the President without further election.  The Vice Presidents shall be elected on nomination by the Nominating Committee or by petition for terms of four years.  The Financial Trustees shall serve terms of six years such that one Financial Trustee is nominated and elected every third year; Financial Trustees may be re-elected upon nomination.  The six additional Directors shall each serve terms of three years such that two new Directors are elected each year; these six additional Directors shall not be immediately re-elected. 

Language of By-Law 13 if changes are adopted.

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

13.  The Board of Directors shall consist of the President, President-Elect, five Vice Presidents, two Financial Trustees, six additional Directors, and Immediate Past President.  In addition, the Executive Director shall be a member of the Board of Directors with voice but without vote.  Except as may be provided otherwise by law, any Director or the entire Board of Directors may be removed, with or without cause, by a majority of the members then entitled to vote in an election duly called for that purpose.

The Officers of the Association shall be a President, a President-Elect, a Past President, five Vice Presidents (one each for Education, Outreach, Professional Matters, Program, and Publications and Research), and an Executive Director.  The Executive Director shall serve as the Secretary of the Association.  In addition, there shall be two Financial Trustees and six additional Directors.  The term of the President is one year; the President shall not be immediately re-elected as President-Elect or Director.  The President-Elect shall be elected on nomination by the Nominating Committee or by petition and shall succeed thereafter to the President without further election.  The Vice Presidents shall be elected on nomination by the Nominating Committee or by petition for terms of four years.  The Financial Trustees shall serve terms of six years such that one Financial Trustee is nominated and elected every third year; Financial Trustees may be re-elected upon nomination.  The six additional Directors shall each serve terms of three years such that two new Directors are elected each year; these six additional Directors shall not be immediately re-elected. 

Rationale

Recent planning exercises and subsequent studies conducted by both the Publications and Research Divisions envisioned developments in existing programs and plans for new projects that consistently involved both the encouragement and guidance of research projects and making plans for the publication of those results.  In general, as the landscape of scholarly publishing changes, the boundaries between research and publication are becoming increasingly porous.  The newly formed Committee on the Translation of Classical Authors is a good example.  It is charged not only with identifying those works for which a new translation would be beneficial but also with developing a relationship with various publishers to produce these works in the appropriate format for each one (e.g., traditional publication, print on demand, digital only).  Combining the Publications and Research Divisions, as is already done in many other learned societies, will make such efforts go more smoothly.

If this amendment is approved, Michael Gagarin, who was recently elected Vice President for Publications, has graciously agreed to serve only a one-year term in this position.  The term of the current Vice President for Research, Roger Bagnall, concludes on the date on which this proposed change would become effective.  The Board will therefore ask the Nominating Committee, as it prepares a slate for the election in Summer 2012, to select candidates for a combined office of Vice President for Publications and Research. 

Adam D. Blistein
Executive Director

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A CAMNE Conference at Durham University
20-22 September 2013
Department of Classics and Ancient History, Durham University, 38 North Bailey, Durham, DH1 3EU, England

'The cosmos of a polis is manpower, of a body beauty, of a soul wisdom, of an action virtue, of a speech truth, and the opposites of these make for acosmia.'

- Gorgias, Encomium of Helen 1

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 07/08/2013 - 1:24pm by .

The Chronicle of Higher Education has recently published three articles arguing against the "conventional wisdom" about enrollments in the humanities and financial outcomes of humanities students.  They are by

Alexander Beecroft, Executive Director of the American Comparative Literature Association

Michael Berube, Past President of the Modern Language Association

Anthony Grafton and James Grossman, Past President and Executive Director, respectively, of the American Historical Association. 

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 07/04/2013 - 8:00pm by Adam Blistein.

The APA Office will be closed on Thursday and Friday, July 4 and 5, 2013.  We will reopen on Monday, July 8.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 07/01/2013 - 1:40pm by Adam Blistein.

Tutto Theatre Company of Austin, Texas, proudly announces the world premiere of Zeus in Therapy, an original theatrical experience adapted from the unpublished poetry of Douglass Stott Parker by the company, and directed by Gary Jaffe.  In 1979, Prof. Parker began writing Zeus in Therapy, a cycle of 52 poems which imagines Zeus on the therapist’s couch. Parker did not ‘finish’ it, though he stopped writing in about 1993, and left it unpublished during his lifetime. Every new poem in the cycle was shared both on his office door and with his classes on a weekly basis for some 25 years. Parker’s poetry is whimsical and profound, cosmic and quotidian, thoughtful and irreverent, but always heartfelt and true. The Company’s translation of Zeus in Therapy into a theatrical experience will bring the power of his words to an even larger audience.

In this adaptation, a diverse ensemble of eleven performers will play Zeus, giving Parker’s words a dynamic range of expression.  Zeus in Therapy runs August 16th through 25th at the Rollins Studio Theater in The Long Center for the Performing Arts in Austin.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/01/2013 - 1:01pm by Adam Blistein.

From The New York Times:

For the last time: Archimedes did not invent a death ray.

An oil painting of Archimedes by Giuseppe Patania, an early 19th century Italian artist, hangs in Palermo. Two inventions credited to Archimedes, death rays and steam cannons, have proved to be stubborn myths.

But more than 2,200 years after his death, his inventions are still driving technological innovations — so much so that experts from around the world gathered recently for a conference at New York University on his continuing influence.

The death ray legend has Archimedes using mirrors to concentrate sunlight to incinerate Roman ships attacking his home of Syracuse, the ancient city-state in the southeast Sicily. It has been debunked no fewer than three times on the television show “Mythbusters” (the third time at the behest of President Obama).

Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/26/2013 - 1:07pm by Information Architect.

On June 19 the Amiercan Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) released the report of its Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences, a group formed over two years ago in response to a request from members of Congress for a report that would respond to the following question:  What are the top ten actions that Congress, state governments, universities, foundations, educators, individual benefactors, and others should take now to maintain national excellence in humanities and social scientific scholarship and education, and to achieve long-term national goals for our intellectual and economic well-being; for a stronger, more vibrant civil society; and for the success of cultural diplomacy in the 21st century? 

Louis Cabot, Chair of the Academy Board, described the report in the following message to Academy Fellows:

I am pleased to announce that the Academy's Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences released its report The Heart of the Matter on Capitol Hill this morning.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/20/2013 - 1:11pm by Adam Blistein.

The 2012-2013 Placement Service Year will end on June 30, 2013.  During the next few weeks, we will perform maintenance on the Placement Service Portal Page to prepare it for 2013-2014.  If you plan to enroll with the Service for 2013-14, PLEASE WAIT for our announcement that will state when enrollment is open for the upcoming Placement Year.  If you enroll prior to our announcement, you will not be issued a refund.

After more than 30 years, the AIA has chosen to terminate its participation with the APA in the Placement Service.  For more information, please visit http://apaclassics.org/index.php/apa_blog/apa_blog_entry/4171/.  If you are currently an AIA member, and you plan to enroll with the APA Placement Service in 2013-2014, you will have to pay the higher, non-member fee (USD $55.00) to enroll.  The APA Member’s fee to utilize the Placement Service is USD $20.00, and you must pay dues for 2013 before the end of June if you wish to register for the Service in July.  Payment may be made online.  The APA welcomes all students of the ancient world, and its members advance the study of the classical antiquity in all its aspects.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/18/2013 - 6:25pm by Adam Blistein.

Adam Blistein recently sent a message to all members inviting you to volunteer to stand for election to Association offices and to serve on APA committees.  The required form may be accessed here, and you may find full information about what is involved in serving in the various positions here

Why do we send this message every year, and why is it important that we have members respond? 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/18/2013 - 1:09pm by Adam Blistein.

The New York Times makes a case that Hollywood learned about the wisdom of producing sequels, prequels, etc. from - among others - ancient Greek tragedians. 

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/04/2013 - 7:03pm by Adam Blistein.

In high school, Joshua D. Sosin had two favorite subjects: Latin and biology. "In the end I decided that my Latin teacher was cooler, and if I, too, wanted to be cool, I should do Latin," he says. That led to a concentration in classics, philosophy, and religion at what is now the University of Mary Washington, where he studied not only Latin but also Greek and Egyptian Coptic. He got a Ph.D. in classics from Duke University in 2000. "At no point did I consider what I would do with any of this," he says.

What he did was go on to a career as a papyrologist and epigraphist, a scholar of inscriptions. Now Mr. Sosin, who is 40, is about to put that training to fresh uses in a job configured unlike any other at Duke. In July he will become director of the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing, a new digital-humanities unit of the Duke University Libraries.

Read more at The Chronicle of Higher Education.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/03/2013 - 2:01pm by Information Architect.

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