SCS 2018 Collegiate Teaching Award Citations

The SCS Teaching Excellence Awards Committee is delighted to announce the 2018 Awards for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College Level.

Please join us in congratulating these excellent educators.

Monessa Cummins, Grinnell College

Monessa Cummins has taught at Grinnell College for nearly thirty-five years, and she has taught almost every course offered by her department, from her original expertise in Greek poetry to Greek and Roman history and archaeology and art and Latin and Greek, to study abroad in Greece.  This is a reality for many who teach at small institutions, as is the prevalence of unrecorded overloads with individual students or small groups. But Dr. Cummins, according to both students and faculty colleagues, does all of this, and does it extraordinarily well.  Everyone speaks of her high standards, but also of the riveting way she conducts her classes, such that, to quote her nomination letter, “the students are all on and with her the whole time”: no internet in the back row here!  She incorporates a variety of newer pedagogies into her classroom, while also grounding students in the basics, not just of Classics: in lecture courses, one student is assigned to be the “recorder” for each session, and that student reviews the material for two minutes at the start of the following class meeting.  So too, one letter reports, students who have no interest in the Classical world sign up for her classes because they know it will – she will – make them better writers. 

Dr. Cummins is also, just as clearly, a role model to her students outside of the classroom.  Student letters abound with stories of her humanity, her caring attitude, and her strictness.  It goes without saying that at a place like Grinnell a teacher like Dr. Cummins is legendary: while the college does not offer teaching awards, there is a lively grapevine that has students seeking her out from their very first semester, and adding Classics as a major, either in addition to what they thought they were going to study in college, or instead of it.  One of her faculty colleagues calls her teaching “challenging, effective, and inspiring,” and this committee agrees. 

The rethinking of curriculum is of course not the kind of thing students necessarily even know about, but the letters from her faculty and administrative colleagues attest to Dr. Cummins’ hard work and achievements in this area as well.  Like many institutions, big and small, Grinnell’s classics department has created a civilization-based track, and she led the department in a reassessment and redesign process that, according to one colleague, resulted in “harmonizing our individual goals and pedagogies,” and in the creation of multidisciplinary courses that play to her particular strengths, and with subject matter that varies from the Trojan War to the debates around cultural patrimony.  

We are honored to recognize Professor Monessa Cummins for her devotion to teaching with the SCS’s 2018 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College Level.

Mike Lippman, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Imagine how students react on the first day of a class on Athens, when their professor tells them that, in the radical democracy of this class, they will be expected to decide how the required material will be considered, how the class will run, how their progress will be assessed, and that they will have to argue for and vote on any change. Mid-semester may find them begging for a tyrant, while struggling with the untidy realities of a truly democratic society. Or consider a class on Sparta, in which students are immediately divided into messes, which will not only work together but receive both reward and punishment for the behavior of individual members. Or a class on ancient athletics in which extra credit is earned through competition with a classmate: push-ups or footraces, songwriting or painting, all are fair game. This kind of experiential learning is a hallmark of Dr. Mike Lippman’s approach to the classroom, and his students eat it up! One student remarks that the Sparta course “put [her] in a position of leadership among [her] peers, forced [her] to make hard choices, and caused [her] to think and exist outside of [her] comfort zone,” exactly the aims of a liberal arts education. Cicero would be pleased.

Dr. Lippman’s innovative pedagogy compels profound, personal, and critical engagement among his students. One of his colleagues at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln comments on his “Pied-Piper-like ability to bring students into our department.” Indeed, since his arrival the number of majors has doubled. And it is not just Classics enrollments that have benefitted from his consummate teaching skills. Beginning Greek enrollments have tripled, and Dr. Lippman is now teaching the first upper level Greek classes offered at UNL in years, often creating these courses in response to specific student interests. The devotion he commands among his students is no better illustrated than by the final comment on one course evaluation: “I just want him to be proud of me.”

But his passion for the Classics is not restricted to the classroom. Since his arrival at UNL, Dr. Lippman has instituted and supported a thriving Classics Club, which among other activities, stages an annual ancient battle reenactment attended by hundreds of students and faculty. He has also organized the Homerathon, a 24-hour reading marathon. Last year, it was Stanley Lombardo’s translation of the Iliad, and readers included students, faculty, staff, a city councilor, and ... Stanley Lombardo! This fostering of community is critical to the future of Humanities in general and Classics in particular, and it takes determination and charisma to make it work. One of his colleagues calls him a “force of nature,” and we heartily agree.

We are honored to recognize Professor Mike Lippman for his outstanding teaching with the SCS’s 2018 Award for Excellence in Teaching of the Classics at the College Level.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following statement:
 
The SCS Board of Directors condemns the practice of writing and circulating anonymous ad hominem attacks. Frank exchange among its members, including openly expressed criticism, are ideals of a scholarly community.  Anonymous attacks contradict the principle of frank exchange.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 1:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

SCS is planning to make available videos of the Sesquicentennial sessions and the public lectures by Luis Alfaro and Mary Beard.  We are currently preparing videos for release. Please note that we will not distribute any video of a paper or lecture without consent from the presenter(s).

The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following resolution of thanks for the 2019 public lecturers.

The SCS Board of Directors hereby thanks playwright Luis Alfaro for delivering a public lecture hosted by the SCS at the 2019 Annual Meeting in San Diego; we are also grateful to Classics and Social Justice and the Onassis Foundation USA for co-organizing the lecture and inviting Luis Alfaro to speak. On the first night of the Meetings in San Diego, he generously shared his creative process with an audience of conference attendees and members of the public. This process involves bringing ancient myths and plays to communities across the US and reimagining them as modern dramas, not for but with community members as active participants in the creation and performance of those dramas. We will post video of his lecture when it is available, so as to make it accessible to those who could not attend. For his lecture, for his plays that connect the ancient and modern, and for bringing new voices to classical studies, we thank Luis Alfaro.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 10:08am by Helen Cullyer.

Thank you to all those who have emailed, written blogs, and posted on social media suggestions for the 2020 Annual Meeting. We are interested in, and are already working on, plans for 2020 incorporating many of the excellent suggestions that we have received. In 2020, we plan to address race and racism in the field head-on with workshops, panels, and special events organized by the SCS President and a number of committees, and to promote equity in all aspects of our programming. We will also work closely with our affiliated groups.

Please help us by submitting abstracts for diverse, inclusive, and innovative panels, workshops, papers, and lightning talks, and see the calls for abstracts already posted. Please consult the individual calls for submission deadlines for affiliated group, organizer-refereed and committee panels on our 2020 Annual Meeting page. Deadlines for panel and workshop proposals and individual abstracts submitted to the program committee will fall in April and the program submission system will open in late February.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 8:52am by Erik Shell.

It has now been nearly two weeks since the SCS-AIA annual meeting in San Diego, and many have written evocative, emotional, and important pieces about the racist events that occurred there. Instead of posting each separately on our social media or blog, I have tried to compile as many as I could in this post.
 

In their own words:

Dan-el Padilla Peralta, “Some thoughts on AIA-SCS 2019,” Medium (January 7, 2019).

----- "SCS 2019: The Future of Classics: Racial Equity and the Production of Knowledge,” Future of Classics Panel (January 5, 2019).

Emma Pettit, “‘My Merit and My Blackness Are Fused to Each Other,” The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 11, 2019).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 01/18/2019 - 6:19am by Sarah Bond.

14th Moisa Research Seminar on Ancient Greek and Roman Music Bressanone/Brixen, 2-6 July 2019

The 14th Moisa Research Seminar will take place from July 2nd to July 6th, 2019 in Bressanone/Brixen (Italy) with the commitment of Padua University and of its Department of Cultural Heritage (https://www.brixen.org/en/bressanone/city-centre.html). 

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/17/2019 - 12:29pm by Erik Shell.

Vergilian Society Seeks Directors for Oct 2020 Symposium in Italy 

(deadline Tuesday April 30, 2019)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 01/16/2019 - 9:52am by Erik Shell.

INDA - Italy's National Institute for Ancient Drama, based in Siracusa (http://www.indafondazione.org) and the journal "Dioniso. Rivista di studi sul teatro antico" are happy to announce the programme of their yearly conference on ancient drama introducing the traditional festival, which will take place in Siracusa from May 9 to Jul. 6. 

The conference will be held from Jan. 31 to Feb. 2 in Siracusa (Salone Amorelli, Palazzo Greco, Corso Matteotti), and its title will be The representation of the divine in ancient theatre. Please find below the full programme: 

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 01/15/2019 - 2:00pm by Erik Shell.

David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship for Travel in Classical Lands

The Fellowship is intended to recognize secondary-school teachers of Greek or Latin who are as dedicated to their students as the Coffins themselves by giving them the opportunity to enrich their teaching and their lives through direct acquaintance with the classical world.

All materials must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on February 27, 2019.

Pedagogy Award

Open to both collegiate and pre-collegiate teachers of classics

The application deadline is March 4, 2019.

Zeph Stewart Latin Teacher Training Award

Open to those preparing for Latin teacher certification.

The application deadline is March 4, 2019.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/15/2019 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.
CfP: Song, Lament, Love: Harking Back to the Sounds of Elegy 
(submission deadline: 28.02.2019)
 
University of Coimbra, June 26-29, 2019

Panel coordinators:
Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (Macquarie University, NSW) Email: Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au
Bill Gladhill (McGill University) Email: charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
Micah Myers (Kenyon College) Email: myersm1@kenyon.edu

The nature of archaic Greek elegy and its performative culture, its interface with other Greek literary genres as well as its Hellenistic and Roman adaptation(s) have already commanded an impressive amount of scholarship. Despite, however, appreciating that the functions of elegy were hugely diversified early on (Nagy 2010; Barbantani 2018), despite overcoming the simplistic classification of elegies to subjective and objective (Cairns 1979; Murray 2010; Miller 2012), and even despite doubting Quintilian’s criticism of Propertius as an obscure poet (Inst.Or.10.1.93), foundational questions on the origins, nature, and meaning(s) of Elegy remain unanswered. Elegy, one of the oldest Greek poetic genres, remains the most elusive.  

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 01/14/2019 - 2:35pm by Erik Shell.

Untold and Inexpressible: Gaps and Ambiguities in the Medicine as an Epistemological Challenge

39th meeting of the Ancient Medicine Interdisciplinary Working Group

Date: 15-16 June 2019
Place: Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine of the University Medical Center Mainz, Am Pulverturm 13, basement (lecture hall U1125)
Deadline: 31 January 2019
Organisation: Norbert W. Paul, Tanja Pommerening

Medical treatments aim to improve the patient’s health. From the patient’s perspective, the elimination of the suffering and the restitution of “normal” life is a crucial part of the process. Patients express this in communication with the practitioner by describing symptoms on one side and impairments affecting their lives on the other. Much of this can hardly be described in words, especially embodied experiences which do not correlate with medical findings and thus are often not deemed relevant. In this regard, the patient faces the rigid and rational diagnostical categories of the practitioner that sometimes do not at all coincide with the patient’s own categories. However, how the gap between the concepts used by the practitioner and the patient could be bridged does rarely come up for discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 01/14/2019 - 1:33pm by Erik Shell.

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The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following statement:
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14th Moisa Research Seminar on Ancient Greek and Roman Music Bressano

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