SCS Board Resolution on Abstract Publication

Resolution approved by the Board of Directors of the SCS, Jan. 6, 2019

The SCS Board of Directors approved the following recommendation at its meeting on January 6, 2019. It will be communicated to journal editors and to classics editors at relevant presses, that is, those whose publications fall under the responsibility of the American Office. We will also investigate whether the recommendation can be more widely discussed and adopted.

Board Resolution

In view of the ever-growing number of articles and chapters in collective volumes that the American Office for L’Année philologique is responsible for processing, it is the strong recommendation of the SCS that journal and volume editors regard it as a best practice and a routine adjunct of the publication process that each article or chapter be accompanied by a brief abstract and a list of keywords.

To ensure the utility of abstracts and keywords for the efficient compilation of data for APh, please take note of the following guidelines:

1. The abstract should give a concise but informative summary of the article’s or chapter’s content, indicating important points of argumentation and main conclusions.

2. The abstract should refer to the types of evidence adduced in drawing these conclusions, and give specific information about the most important items.

  • literary: cite the author or genre, and if an author, cite the works discussed and the most significant passages (The recommended abbreviations of Greek works are as in LSJ or DGE [http://www.filol.csic.es/dge/lst/2lst1.htm], and of Latin works as in TLL.)
  • epigraphical:  cite the most significant inscriptions
  • papyrological: cite the papyri (for the standard abbreviations, use the Checklist at http://papyri.info/docs/checklist)
  • artistic: cite the significant pieces, remembering to include museum inventory numbers
  • manuscript evidence: cite the library and shelfmark
  • archaeological: include the name of the sponsoring institution and the nature of the evidence (such as field report)

3. Abstract and keywords should be provided under a Creative Commons license.

Reasoning for this Resolution

Over the past couple of years, the SCS Board of Directors and its Advisory Board on the American Office of L’Année philologique has been following the progress of the transition of the classical bibliographic database to a new publisher and provider of online access, namely Brepols. This change came about because SIBC (Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique) found it necessary to make new arrangements since the previous platform could no longer be sustained.

This transition has been a source of uncertainty for at least two reasons. First, the different pricing structure used by Brepols has made it unclear for the moment how many old subscribers have maintained their subscriptions or how many new subscribers have been acquired. Second, changes both in the level of projected revenue to be shared among local offices and in the terms governing the royalties to SCS for the data that was originally developed by the Database of Classical Bibliography have made it likely that these sources will provide less support than previously toward the budget of the American Office. The actual decrease, if any, will not be clear until the effects of the transition are fully understood in the next year or two.

The other important aspect of the transition has been the change in workflow for the bibliographers at the local offices. Initially, productivity was, as expected, reduced somewhat as people were learning the new system, but now productivity is normal once more. Brepols is experimenting with technological solutions that could one day improve productivity, but these efforts are still embryonic. Brepols also wants to improve the online database by encouraging the bibliographers to enter more keywords for piece.

Meanwhile, the amount of material that would ideally be covered in the database keeps growing year by year. The American Office is responsible for journals and numerous collective volumes originating in English-speaking countries, and some from elsewhere. Some journals and edited volumes already publish abstracts of their articles, and these abstracts are often a great help to the bibliographers, since a good abstract significantly shortens the time a bibliographer needs to devote to the associated article or chapter. The Advisory Board concluded that one way to help the personnel of the American Office meet the challenge of the ever-increasing material is to recommend that the practice of including abstracts (and keywords) be much more widely adopted and that the usefulness of abstracts be promoted by giving guidance about what will smooth the workflow for the bibliographers. The recommendation includes the notion that abstracts ought to be provided with a Creative Commons license, since the point of the abstract is to inform potential readers and attract them to the full article, not to earn revenue through the assertion of copyright restrictions.

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Ancient Greek Literature

Eligibility: UK/EU/International graduates with the required entry requirements

Funding details: Bursary plus tuition fees (UK/EU/International)

Duration: Full-time – for a maximum of four years, or Part-time - for a maximum of six years

Application deadline: 15th January 2021

Interview dates: Will be confirmed to shortlisted candidates

Start date: September 2021. Please note that May 2021 is also potentially available if preferred - subject to discussion and agreement

For enquiries, please contact Professor Judith Mossman


Coventry University is inviting applications from suitably qualified graduates for a fully funded PhD studentship.

Project details

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD studentship, either full or part-time, in Ancient Greek literature.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/10/2020 - 10:48am by Erik Shell.

In 2020, the inaugural year of the SCS Erich S. Gruen Prize, the selection committee received 31 submissions from graduate students across North America treating aspects of race, ethnicity, or cultural exchange in the ancient Mediterranean. The committee was impressed with the candidates’ overall quality as well as range. Papers received, all anonymized before review, reflected the temporal and geographical breadth of classical and Near Eastern antiquity and diverse disciplinary perspectives including archaeology, art history, epigraphy, history and philology. 

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 12/09/2020 - 8:13am by Helen Cullyer.

On December 2, the University of Vermont (UVM) announced devastating cuts to many programs and departments, including Classics. SCS President Sheila Murnaghan and Director of the Classics Advisory Service Jeff Henderson have written to the UVM Provost and President in support of Classics and to protest the deep cuts. Prof. Henderson continues to stay in close touch with department chair John Franklin to provide support and assistance to everyone in the Classics department. Other humanities organizations, including the Medieval Academy of America, are also supporting the humanities at UVM.

Individuals can take action by signing this petition, which was created by a UVM student. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 12/07/2020 - 10:12am by Helen Cullyer.

ANTIQUITY IN MEDIA STUDIES is holding our first-ever virtual conference, and you're invited!

via Zoom on 11-12 December 2020, Eastern Standard Time

AIMS is a newly organized group of scholars who collaborate on research, pedagogy, and outreach activities that examine and enrich how people around the world engage with the concept and contents of "antiquity" in a variety of media. Since our inception via the Classical Antiquity section of the Film & History conference, we have been expanding our focus to include the wider Mediterranean world, with the goal of welcoming engagements with antiquities from around the globe.

In recognition of the ever-greater ubiquity of screens in our professional lives under COVID, this year's conference focuses on receptions through screen-media platforms, including film, television, streaming video, video games, and social media. Our closing session features remarks on the state of Classical Reception Studies by Monica S. Cyrino (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque) and Antony Augoustakis (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign).

The detailed program, abstracts, code of conduct, and other information are available at the conference website:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/07/2020 - 6:40am by Erik Shell.

(Un)-Forgotten Realms: Science Fiction and Fantasy in and about the Ancient Mediterranean

25th Annual Classics Graduate Student Colloquium

University of Virginia

Saturday, April 17th, 2021

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Rea (University of Florida)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 12/04/2020 - 2:58pm by Erik Shell.

Late in the afternoon on November 5, 2020 — close to 24 hours after polls across the country had closed for the 2020 elections — the NRA tweeted a familiar phrase: “Come and Take It.”

In May of 2018, I wrote about the valorization of ancient Sparta for Eidolon. The article underscored Spartan culture as a romantic figment of the far right imagination within America. The growth in the use of Plutarch’s alleged quote of the Spartan king Leonidas, whom the Greek historian says answered back ‘μολὼν λαβέ’ (“having come, take” or in less direct translation, “come and take [them]”) to the Persian king Xerxes when told to surrender his arms, continues to grow in popularity among gun enthusiasts on the far right. 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/04/2020 - 7:52am by Sarah E. Bond.

Non-human Animals in Ancient Greek Philosophy and Religion

May 13-15, 2021 (Online Conference)

Non-human animals figured prominently in ancient Greek agriculture, diet, medicine, visual art, homelife and war practices. They were also portrayed and examined in various poems, plays, dialogues and treatises. This conference aims at examining ancient Greek philosophical and religious views on issues pertaining to the nature and status of non-human animals and the attitudes of human beings towards them. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. The religious significance of animal sacrifice in Greek antiquity

  2. The depiction of animals in Greek myth and poetry

  3. The goals of the systematic study of animals in Ancient Greece

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 12/02/2020 - 11:53am by Erik Shell.

Specialized Labor in Classical Antiquity: Economy, Identity, Community

May 14-15, 2021, Zoom Webinar

Keynote Speakers: David Hollander (Iowa State University) and Lynne Kvapil (Butler University)

The notion of ‘specialized labor’ informs research on economic growth in antiquity, ancient slavery, urbanism, philosophical discussions of craft and knowledge, and so much more. But what is specialized labor? In what contexts did it exist in classical antiquity, and why? What were its economic consequences, and how did its existence shape discourses concerning work, knowledge, and identity? Who were the people performing this labor, and what impact did it have on their lives?

The past decade has seen a surge in interest about the lives of workers both in the ancient Mediterranean and beyond. From in-depth case studies (such as Flohr 2013; Tran 2013) to expansive volumes (Verboven and Laes, eds. 2017; Stewart, Harris, and Lewis, eds. 2020) and dedicated conferences, there is an increasing awareness of and interest in what labor looked like in classical antiquity. This conference will join that conversation. Specialized labor provides an approach to understanding labor that bypasses the valuation of labor as ‘skilled’ or ‘unskilled’ by focusing more closely on the division of labor rather than its social prestige. Charcoal burners and mosaicists alike may be specialists, for all the differences in their professional lives.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 12/02/2020 - 6:32am by Erik Shell.

PhD scholarships in the Humanities at Newcastle University

Northern Bridge Consortium offers up to 67 fully funded doctoral studentships to outstanding applicants across the full range of arts and humanities subjects, including Creative Practice disciplines, and interdisciplinary studies. As of 2020/21, all international students will be eligible to apply for Northern Bridge Consortium studentships, including EU and non-EU citizens. 

We run an annual competition to select the best doctoral candidates and provide a comprehensive and attractive package of financial support over the duration of study, which incorporates:

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 11/30/2020 - 11:35am by Erik Shell.

1st -3rd September 2021

Abstracts are invited for contributions to a conference on “Reflections on language in early Greece”, to be held on-line (via Zoom or a similar platform) on 1st-3rd September 2021. By ‘early Greece’ we have in mind texts and other cultural artefacts earlier than Plato, and materials that are all too often overlooked in scholarly discussions of Greek reflections on the nature of language. We envisage the conference as offering a series of independent yet mutually illuminating contributions, which illustrate the significance of the topic in this period and the wealth of views and approaches adopted towards it, beyond and besides the traditional opposition between physis and thesis, or between a Cratylus and a Hermogenes. To this end, we hope that our conference will cut across genres, traditional periodizations and academic disciplinary boundaries and we welcome contributions that straddle the divide between Classics, Philosophy, and Linguistics.

Themes that we wish to examine include, but are not limited to:

·         The correctness or incorrectness of language (incl. names)

·         The potential of language to represent reality; the role of language as a tool for accessing reality or as an obstacle to doing so

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 11/30/2020 - 11:34am by Erik Shell.

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