From the SCS President and Executive Director

We are writing for two reasons. First, we reiterate the statement of 1/6/19, authored and approved by the Board of Directors in San Diego. There is no place for racism in our field and we feel that is important to reissue that statement, given the increasing toxicity of online debate and the intensification of online harassment over the last few days:

“The Board of Directors of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) condemns the racist acts and speech that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting. The Society’s policy on harassment addresses, among other things, hostility and abuse based on race and ethnicity. There is no place for racism on the part of members, attendees, vendors, and contractors at the meeting.  In addition, the Board reaffirms its statement of November 2016 in which the directors condemned ‘the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.’” 

Second, we would like to make a clarification regarding Professor Sarah Bond. After the Future of Classics panel, a number of complaints were brought to the Society’s Committee on Professional Ethics. A member of the SCS filed a formal complaint against Professor Bond. The Committee dismissed this complaint, determining in accordance with our procedures that the complaint was not credible and did not rise to the level of requiring formal investigation. The Committee did not approve or recommend to the Board any formal censure of her. However, the Committee did advise that someone communicate to her informally, on behalf of the Committee, some concerns regarding her behavior at the panel. The subsequent communication with Professor Bond resulted in misunderstandings of the content and intent of the Ethics Committee's concerns, particularly because it was not explicitly stated to Professor Bond that she was not being formally censured as a result of a complaint. We apologize for the great hurt and damage that this has caused to Professor Sarah Bond, our Communications Committee chair and blog editor, who does so much good for the Society.  The President and Executive Director bear the ultimate responsibility for the miscommunication and mishandling of the situation, and the subsequent damage, including the ambiguity of whether she was censured. Together with the Board, we are reviewing our procedures to ensure that what Professor Bond experienced does not happen again.

Mary T. Boatwright, SCS President 2019 

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director 


Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Vera Lachmann was born in Berlin in 1904 into a family of the German-Jewish aristocracy. She attended a private school for girls, following which she studied philology at the Universities of Berlin and Basel and received her Ph.D. from the University of Berlin in 1931. Although she expected to teach at a German university, the bias against women led her to take the examinations that qualified her to teach at the Gymnasium level. In April 1933, with Hitler in power, she established a private school that was held on the grounds of relatives. The Nazis closed the school shortly after Kristallnacht. With the aid of friends in Germany and the United States she was able to leave Germany in November 1939. On arriving in the United States. she taught first at Vassar. Soon after, she taught for two years at Salem College in North Carolina, one academic year at Bryn Mawr, and two years at Yale. Her most substantial employment was at Brooklyn College, where she taught large courses in classical civilization and Greek drama in translation, and smaller courses in Greek:  Antigone, Oedipus at Colonus, and the Iliad. Castrum Peregrini Press of Amsterdam published three books of her poetry, German and English on facing pages. A considerable number of her poems are on themes from ancient Greece. She died in 1985. In 2004 I edited Homer’s Sun Still Shines:  Ancient Greece in Essays, Poems and Translations by Vera Lachmann.                

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 08/01/2014 - 12:00pm by Ellen Bauerle.

That sinking feeling when you realize you’ve completely underestimated the scope of a project? I’m far more familiar with it than I’d like to admit.

It was what I felt when I began analyzing the data I gathered in the library and vaults of the American Numismatic Society on provincial coinage minted under the Severan dynasty. I’d received a grant from my home institution to place the images and legends on provincial coinage in conversation with that of imperial coinage. I thought by doing so, I could bring to life the negotiations of ideology between local concerns and imperial propaganda.

It was a good idea, an exciting new methodology. What I failed to realize is the quantity of data I had to consider in analyzing provincial and imperial coinage. My philologically focused graduate school training had not prepared me for this—in order to analyze the relationships in any systematic way I would need to keep an impossibly large body of data in my head.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 08/01/2014 - 11:00am by Ellen Bauerle.

I became a Classicist because of Alfred V. Morro (1920-2005, photo below left).

Almost everyone in the state of Rhode Island above a certain age would (a) recognize Al’s name, and (b) be surprised by my statement because he was almost exclusively known as a football and track coach of great success and rare ferocity at Providence Classical High School. If you can remember what college football fans outside of Ohio State thought about the late Woody Hayes, or, more recently, what college basketball fans outside of Indiana University thought about Bobby Knight in his chair-throwing days, you have some idea of Al’s reputation in Rhode Island.

In the background of the photo below right you can see him haranguing his troops in a pose that was familiar to all who knew him. In fact, that photo shows me becoming familiar with that pose because I was an assistant manager on the football team, and I am the young man in the gray sweatshirt with his back to the camera.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 08/01/2014 - 10:00am by Wells Hansen.

Kellan Lutz and Dwayne Johnson as HerculesThis year’s been a productive one for big-budget hack-and-slash films set in the ancient world.  Besides a disastrous (so to speak) Pompeii and the 300 sequel focused on Themistocles and Artemisia, theatergoers have had the opportunity (some might say the misfortune) to see two movies about Hercules: The Legendary Hercules, starring Kellan Lutz, released in January, and Hercules, starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, released this month.  (For convenience, and for love of portmanteaux, I’ll refer to the latter as Rockules and the former as Herculutz.  Also for convenience, I’m ignoring the mockbuster Hercules Reborn, also released this year.)  I watched and enjoyed them both — your mileage may vary — and noticed overlapping themes in the way each movie characterizes its protagonist as grappling not only with his foes but also with his destiny as a mythic hero.

Needless to say, spoiler alert for both movies, and for the comic book on which Rockules is based (on which, see Gellar-Goad & Bedingham, forthcoming in Electra volume 3).

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/31/2014 - 9:14am by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.

We regret to announce the death in June of long-time member Stephen G. Daitz. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 07/30/2014 - 3:23pm by Adam Blistein.

We regret to report the death of long-time member Paul B. Harvey of Penn State.  The Centre Daily Times printed this obituary.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 07/30/2014 - 10:45am by Adam Blistein.

The Princeton University Society of Fellows invites applications for three-year postdoctoral fellowships 2015-2018 for recent PhDs (from Jan. 2013) in humanities or allied social sciences.  FOUR appointments to pursue research and teach half-time in the following areas: Open discipline (two fellowships); Humanistic Studies; Race and/or Ethnicity Studies. Stipend: approx. $80,000.  For eligibility, fellowship and application details, see www.princeton.edu/sfApplication deadline: October 1, 2014

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/30/2014 - 9:55am by Adam Blistein.

The University of Oklahoma has received a $572,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the development of a digital library of Latin texts of all eras.  The Digital Latin Library—a Linked Open Data resource—has its origins in discussions between the Foundation and the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in 2011.  In 2012 SCS, in collaboration with the Medieval Academy of America and the Renaissance Society of America, requested and received funding from the Foundation for a feasibility study to determine the appropriate scope of the project and to identify institutions where it could be carried out.  SCS Information Architect Samuel Huskey directed the feasibility study, and with the endorsement of all three learned societies submitted an initial implementation grant to the Foundation on behalf of his home institution, the University of Oklahoma, with the help of his collaborators, June Abbas and Chris Weaver.  The new grant funds the first year of a three year project, which has two components:  The Digital Latin Library and the Library of Digital Latin Texts. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/24/2014 - 10:10am by Adam Blistein.

In January the Amphora editorial board enjoyed a spirited conversation about the future of footnotes. Will they become—have they perhaps already become—the "slide rules of the humanities," legendary, nostalgia-evoking, but outdated, tools?

The world in which footnotes vanish, having been fully supplanted by links, mouse-overs, pop-ups, and the like, is that not-so-distant future world in which print has been replaced by all the various forms of digital communication that surround us today—and probably by many forms that most of us cannot yet imagine. But that day has not yet come. That Amphora would continue to publish a print version alongside its new presence in the APA blog and soon-to-emerge increased visibility on the APA website is not a choice the editorial board made without considerable conversation and thought. Put very simply, the argument for keeping the print version was that the editorial board wanted Amphora to remain a physical presence that is easy "for us to share, and for others to pass along to their friends." That Amphora should be easily shared and re-shared is a sentiment that all of us on the editorial board warmly embrace.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/24/2014 - 4:28am by Wells Hansen.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is advertising a year-long paid internship at its museum in Corinth and several short-term unpaid internships at its offices in Princeton, New Jersey.  The application deadline for the Corinth internship is August 20, 2014.  The short-term internships offer experiences in non-profit administration; development, marketing, and event planning; and archives.  Applications for the short-term internships can be made at any time.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/23/2014 - 3:13pm by Adam Blistein.

Pages

Latest Stories

Awards and Fellowships
Public Statements
Presidential Letters
Please see below a message from the

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy