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Sneak Peek: TAPA 147.1

Forthcoming in TAPA 147.1 (Spring 2017)

P. J. Finglass, “Euripides’ Oedipus: A Response to Liapis”
This article examines the hypothesis, recently advanced by Vayos Liapis in this journal (TAPA 144: 307-70), that most of the quotation fragments of Euripides’ Oedipus belong not to that play but to a much later rhetorical exercise. It argues that the overwhelming majority of the faults alleged by Liapis are fully compatible with Euripidean language and style; and that even if the authenticity of one or two fragments can be called into question, there is no evidence to support the view that they come from a work written centuries after Euripides’ death.

Eric Dugdale, “Of This and That: The Recognition Formula in Sophocles’ Electra”
This paper offers an analysis of recognition in Sophocles’ Electra. It identifies a particular verbal element marking many recognitions in tragedy: referred to as the recognition formula, it typically pairs proximal and distal deictics (e.g., ὅδ᾿ ἐστίν ... κεῖνος, Soph. OT 1145), and is mentioned in Aristotle’s discussion of recognition (οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, Poetics 1448b17). Its occurrence at key moments in Sophocles’ Electra highlights the spatial relocation of the returning exile Orestes. It also points to the play’s interest in deception and the implications of this for recognition, and broadens our understanding of what constitutes recognition beyond the single “recognition scene.”

Chun-liong Ng, “Plato’s Defense of Athens”
This paper argues that in the Statesman Plato recognizes a complementary relationship between democracy and law. Reinventing the metaphors involving physicians and pilots, Plato brings the issue of trust back to his theoretical agenda. This radical thought experiment has anti-intellectual implications: the people should put their trust in the body of law drawn up by themselves rather than following the professionals, whose motivations are not always pure. The Statesman incorporates Plato’s experience of post-Socratic Athens. It presents a unique defense of democracy; its anti-intellectual elements do not appear in Plato’s other discussions of democracy, the Protagoras and the Laws.

Brian Walters, “The Circulation and Delivery of Cicero’s Post Reditum ad Populum”
This article calls into question recent suggestions that Cicero circulated but failed to deliver the Post reditum ad populum. Cicero’s own habits, late-Republican practices of publication, and the political necessities of the moment make such claims unlikely. The various contradictions in the surviving oration are easily resolved if we posit an early circulation, that is, of a pre-delivery version of the speech. Suspected omissions in Cicero’s account of the delivery of the speech are shown to be illusory. The speech of thanks to the people was delivered, as Cicero himself tells us, on 7 September 57 BCE.

John M. Oksanish, “Amant Alterna Camenae: Vergil’s Third Eclogue at the Dawn of Roman Literary History”
In Eclogue 3, Vergil flags the rough verses of his quarreling shepherds as alterna, evoking similar songs in aetiologies of early drama in the Georgics, in Livy, and in Horace. These later treatments often set early Italian practices against their foreign (especially Greek) counterparts to interrogate contemporary literary and social concerns. I argue that Eclogue 3—albeit with pastoral obliqueness—does the same, adumbrating a discomfort with indigenous Italian coarseness. My conclusion reassesses the significance of Palaemon’s judgment (e.g., his award of the vitula to both herdsmen) in the context of Roman literary history.

John K. Schafer, “Authorial Pagination in the Eclogues and Georgics”
A meaningful and authorial disposition of these works onto the columns of script (paginae) of a papyrus roll can be recovered from their text: 36 lines per column for the Eclogues, 40 for the Georgics. The pagination is an artistic feature of the works: the text mimetically responds to and comments on its column-breaks, investing the column and margins with various figurative valences. Lines at column-breaks are anomalous in several ways. These phenomena are too frequent and rich to be coincidental; at least some early copies of the text will have borne this arrangement.

Amanda Coles, “Between Patronage and Prejudice: Freedman Magistrates in the Late Roman Republic and Empire”
From the Late Republic to High Empire, inscriptions attest to seventeen freed magistrates, including quaestors, aediles, duoviri, octoviri, and quattuorviri, from colonies, oppida, and municipia in Greece, Macedonia, Illyria, Africa, and Italy. These examples obviate the assumption that freedmen could only hold office in a Caesarian colony before the lex Visellia (24 CE). Rather, individual freedmen were elected thanks to patronage, public benefactions, and a local preference for economic success over traditional, aristocratic hierarchies such as Rome’s. The fact that Roman customs and laws did not govern all colonies or municipia equally demonstrates the flexibility of Roman imperialism.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.

Andromache Karanika will officially become the Editor of TAPA in January 2018, but will handle incoming submissions effective immediately.

Please send all submissions electronically to tapa@uci.edu, following TAPA guidelines. Craig Gibson will remain the official Editor through 2017 and is in charge of producing this year's issues (147.1 and 2).

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 03/21/2017 - 8:04am by Erik Shell.

Kenchreai

This article was originally published on the SCS website on August 8, 2015; it has been reformatted and edited to adhere to current blog conventions. All links are active, however, some infromation such as pricing may have changed.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/20/2017 - 1:00am by Sebastian Heath.

This message is intended for members in the US.  Yesterday, President Trump’s budget blueprint was published.  It calls for the elimination of many crucial educational and cultural agencies including the NEH, NEA, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and Institute of Museum of Library Services (IMLS). 

A brief survey of grants made by the NEH over the last seven years shows the potential impact on our field.  The NEH has funded:

-          Numerous research fellowships for individual scholars as well as the SCS-administered TLL Fellowship and the fellowship program at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

-          Digitization, publication, and editing of ancient coins, inscriptions, and papyri.

-          Projects that explore the use of computational methods for analyzing ancient texts.

-          Archaeological projects from Italy to Jordan.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Fri, 03/17/2017 - 8:44am by Helen Cullyer.

After a temporary 30% discount, Oxford University Press has permanently increased its discount on all Classics titles for SCS Members to 25% off, up from 20% previously. OUP has also added a new, 30% discount subscription to the Oxford Classical Dictionary, an exclusive benefit for SCS members only.

Both of these benefits are available to SCS members on the "Members Only" page after signing in.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.

Roman Cultural Memory

Sao Paulo, Brazil 7th-9th March 2018

A series of three conferences will explore the impact of the bourgeoning field of memory studies on the study of Latin Literature and Culture.

The first conference at King's College London (Nov. 2016) has focused on cultural memory in the Roman Republic.
The second conference at Paris (June 2017) will look at Augustan cultural memory and the third conference in Sao Paulo (March 2018) will concentrate on cultural memory under the Roman Empire.

We are inviting submissions of abstracts for the third session in Sao Paulo, Brazil (7th - 9th March 2018). Papers will focus on cultural memory under the Roman Empire (i.e. post-Augustan)

For a full description of the project please visit the conference website

https://sites.google.com/site/romanculturalmemory/project-description

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 10:01am by Erik Shell.

Teach the Teachers Workshop

Tufts University Boston MA August 14-16th, 2017

The Perseids Project in conjunction with  the Department of Classics at Tufts University is calling for participants in the second Teach the Teachers workshop.

This three-day workshop aims to showcase the Perseids platform and explore the uses of these tools in a classroom setting. Registration for this workshop will be free and financial support for travel and lodging will be provided. We are looking for participants who teach at the High school or secondary school level, as well as Phd candidates and graduate students.

The purpose of this workshop is to facilitate the exchange of new ideas for the implementation of the Perseids Platform in the classroom. We encourage you to experiment with our tools before attending the workshop, so that you can bring your own ideas about implementations in the classroom for discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 9:25am by Erik Shell.

Rosetta Stone By © Hans Hillewaert, CC BY-SA 4.0

Arrival has gotten serious buzz in academic circles, and for good reason. The premise of the film is the idea that the language you speak shapes the kind of thoughts you can have. Formally, that idea is called the “linguistic relativity hypothesis” or Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, and the film thus brings one of the more controversial and intriguing theories in the scholarly study of language before the popular imagination. It is an idea that could fundamentally change what we think we know about the ancient world.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/13/2017 - 1:00am by William Michael Short.

A reminder that there are two deadlines for submissions for the SCS Annual Meeting in January 2018 in Boston.

Individual abstracts are due by 11.59pm eastern on April 26.

However, all other submissions (panels, workshops, reports on affiliated group panels, roundtables etc.) are due by 11.59pm eastern on April 7.

The program submission system is available at http://program.classicalstudies.org

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 03/12/2017 - 8:08pm by Helen Cullyer.

The Making of the Humanities VI

University of Oxford, Somerville College, UK
September 28-30, 2017

The sixth conference on the history of the humanities, ‘The Making of the Humanities VI’, will take place at the University of Oxford, Humanities Division and Somerville College, UK, from 28 till 30 September 2017.

Goal of the Making of the Humanities (MoH) Conferences

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 03/10/2017 - 8:59am by Erik Shell.

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