Sneak Peek: TAPA 147.1

Forthcoming in TAPA 147.1 (Spring 2017)

P. J. Finglass, “Euripides’ Oedipus: A Response to Liapis”
This article examines the hypothesis, recently advanced by Vayos Liapis in this journal (TAPA 144: 307-70), that most of the quotation fragments of Euripides’ Oedipus belong not to that play but to a much later rhetorical exercise. It argues that the overwhelming majority of the faults alleged by Liapis are fully compatible with Euripidean language and style; and that even if the authenticity of one or two fragments can be called into question, there is no evidence to support the view that they come from a work written centuries after Euripides’ death.

Eric Dugdale, “Of This and That: The Recognition Formula in Sophocles’ Electra”
This paper offers an analysis of recognition in Sophocles’ Electra. It identifies a particular verbal element marking many recognitions in tragedy: referred to as the recognition formula, it typically pairs proximal and distal deictics (e.g., ὅδ᾿ ἐστίν ... κεῖνος, Soph. OT 1145), and is mentioned in Aristotle’s discussion of recognition (οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, Poetics 1448b17). Its occurrence at key moments in Sophocles’ Electra highlights the spatial relocation of the returning exile Orestes. It also points to the play’s interest in deception and the implications of this for recognition, and broadens our understanding of what constitutes recognition beyond the single “recognition scene.”

Chun-liong Ng, “Plato’s Defense of Athens”
This paper argues that in the Statesman Plato recognizes a complementary relationship between democracy and law. Reinventing the metaphors involving physicians and pilots, Plato brings the issue of trust back to his theoretical agenda. This radical thought experiment has anti-intellectual implications: the people should put their trust in the body of law drawn up by themselves rather than following the professionals, whose motivations are not always pure. The Statesman incorporates Plato’s experience of post-Socratic Athens. It presents a unique defense of democracy; its anti-intellectual elements do not appear in Plato’s other discussions of democracy, the Protagoras and the Laws.

Brian Walters, “The Circulation and Delivery of Cicero’s Post Reditum ad Populum”
This article calls into question recent suggestions that Cicero circulated but failed to deliver the Post reditum ad populum. Cicero’s own habits, late-Republican practices of publication, and the political necessities of the moment make such claims unlikely. The various contradictions in the surviving oration are easily resolved if we posit an early circulation, that is, of a pre-delivery version of the speech. Suspected omissions in Cicero’s account of the delivery of the speech are shown to be illusory. The speech of thanks to the people was delivered, as Cicero himself tells us, on 7 September 57 BCE.

John M. Oksanish, “Amant Alterna Camenae: Vergil’s Third Eclogue at the Dawn of Roman Literary History”
In Eclogue 3, Vergil flags the rough verses of his quarreling shepherds as alterna, evoking similar songs in aetiologies of early drama in the Georgics, in Livy, and in Horace. These later treatments often set early Italian practices against their foreign (especially Greek) counterparts to interrogate contemporary literary and social concerns. I argue that Eclogue 3—albeit with pastoral obliqueness—does the same, adumbrating a discomfort with indigenous Italian coarseness. My conclusion reassesses the significance of Palaemon’s judgment (e.g., his award of the vitula to both herdsmen) in the context of Roman literary history.

John K. Schafer, “Authorial Pagination in the Eclogues and Georgics”
A meaningful and authorial disposition of these works onto the columns of script (paginae) of a papyrus roll can be recovered from their text: 36 lines per column for the Eclogues, 40 for the Georgics. The pagination is an artistic feature of the works: the text mimetically responds to and comments on its column-breaks, investing the column and margins with various figurative valences. Lines at column-breaks are anomalous in several ways. These phenomena are too frequent and rich to be coincidental; at least some early copies of the text will have borne this arrangement.

Amanda Coles, “Between Patronage and Prejudice: Freedman Magistrates in the Late Roman Republic and Empire”
From the Late Republic to High Empire, inscriptions attest to seventeen freed magistrates, including quaestors, aediles, duoviri, octoviri, and quattuorviri, from colonies, oppida, and municipia in Greece, Macedonia, Illyria, Africa, and Italy. These examples obviate the assumption that freedmen could only hold office in a Caesarian colony before the lex Visellia (24 CE). Rather, individual freedmen were elected thanks to patronage, public benefactions, and a local preference for economic success over traditional, aristocratic hierarchies such as Rome’s. The fact that Roman customs and laws did not govern all colonies or municipia equally demonstrates the flexibility of Roman imperialism.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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 Soldiers carrying banners depicting Julius Caesar's triumphant military exploits, from The Triumph of Julius Caesar

Latinists enjoy ready access to online texts collected under names like Perseus, PHI, and the Latin Library, collections which are now as much a fixture of scholarly workflows as OCTs, Teubners, and Loebs. Descriptive data and statistics about these texts are harder to find. How many times does Lucretius use the future imperative? How many ablatives absolute are there in Cicero’s De amicitia? Where does ensis appear in Caesar’s writings? (Answers at the end of this post.) Opera Latina is a search interface from the Laboratoire d’Analyse Statistique des Langues Anciennes (LASLA) at the University of Liège that draws on over five decades of linguistic research on Latin literature to return the sort of descriptive details posed in the questions above. The database currently includes 154 works from 19 authors: Caesar, Cato, Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Juvenal, Lucretius, Ovid, Persius, Petronius, Plautus, Pliny the Younger, Propertius, Quintus Curtius Rufus, Sallust, Seneca the Younger, Tactius, Tibullus, and Vergil.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/21/2017 - 12:00am by Patrick J. Burns.

Lyric and the Sacred, 27 June – July 1 2018, Spetses, Greece

Lucia Athanassaki (University of Crete) and André Lardinois (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen) announce the 5th Open Conference which they are co-organizing on behalf of the Network for the Study of Archaic and Classical Greek Song (http://www.ru.nl/greeksong).

The conference will take place on the island of Spetses in Greece from June 27th to July 1st 2018. The topic of the conference is ‘Lyric and the Sacred’.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:38am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Wilderness, Frontiers, and New Worlds in Antiquity

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

New York University

November 4, 2017

Keynote: Prof. Emily Greenwood (Yale University) "Classics and the Travelers' Tool Kit: literature on ancient and modern frontiers"

Unfamiliar, unexplored, and unsettled places captivated the ancient imagination and were of pressing importance not only to poets and prose writers of every genre, but also to merchants, militaries, and governing bodies enticed by the prospects of new sites for trading, settling, and conquering. There has been a swell of critical interest recently in the topics of borders and boundaries in the ancient world, as part of the increased scholarly attention to space over the past few decades. Our conference is interested in spaces beyond borders, and we aim to explore ancient encounters with wilderness, frontiers, and unknown lands.

Possible topics include:

•   Visual representations of wilderness and extreme environments

•   Representations in ancient texts of the landscape, weather, and human adaptation in unexplored lands

•   Narrations and theorizations of journeys undersea, into the sky, or below the earth

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:34am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers for the 2018 Symposium Cumanum:
rerum cognoscere causas: Learning in the Late Republic and the Augustan Age

June 26–30, 2018

Co-Directors: T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University) and Christopher B. Polt (Boston College)
Confirmed speakers: Barbara Weiden Boyd, Monica R. Gale, Steven J. Green, Alison Keith, James J. O'Hara, and Alessandro Schiesaro

The Vergilian Society invites proposals for papers for the 2018 Symposium Cumanum at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma, Italy.

Learning and teaching were fundamental to Roman literature from the start: Livius Andronicus, the primus auctor of Latin letters, was first a teacher whose pedagogic experiences profoundly shaped his own writing (Feeney, Beyond Greek). Instruction becomes a special interest in the culture and literature of the late Republic and Augustan periods, when attitudes towards education find complex, fluid, and multivalent expressions (Bloomer, The School of Rome). This symposium aims to interrogate the varied, shifting roles that teaching and learning play in this pivotal period, especially with reference to the literary milieu in which Vergil was educated and to which he contributed.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 08/15/2017 - 3:00pm by Erik Shell.
McKeldin Library

(From insidehighered.com)

Scott Jaschik from Inside Higher Ed has written a story about the statement the SCS board released last Fall.

"The statement notes that the ancient world was not monolithic and in fact was influenced by people of different regions and cultures."

You can read the full piece at Inside Higher Ed here, and read the board's original statement from last Fall here.

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(Photo: "McKeldin Library, University of Maryland" by George Williams, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 08/15/2017 - 8:18am by Erik Shell.

Annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop

The Annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop (41st in the series inauguratedand periodically sponsored by The University of Texas at Austin) will be held February 23-24, 2018, at The University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. This workshop is sponsored by the UF Department of Philosophy in coordination with the UF Department of Classics, with support from the UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Proposals are invited for papers on any problem, figure, or issue in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Each paper will be allotted forty-five minutes for oral presentation and will be followed by open discussion.

To propose a paper, send a 1-page abstract of 300-500 words to palmerj@ufl.edu under the subject heading “Workshop Proposal.” Please provide contact information in the email but no identifying info in the abstract itself. Proposals are due no later than Friday, December 1, 2017. Proposers will be notified of selections by Friday, December 15. Complete papers will be due to session chairs and respondents by Friday, January 26, 2018.

Proposals or questions to:

palmerj.ufl.edu

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 2:45pm by Erik Shell.

Humanities for All:

A National Survey of Public Engagement in the Humanities in Higher Education

CALL FOR ASSISTANCE

The National Humanities Alliance Foundation is currently conducting a national study of public engagement in the humanities at institutions of higher education.

This national study surveys the range of ways that higher ed faculty, students, and administrators have connected with diverse communities through the humanities over the past decade (short abstract available here). We are especially interested in initiatives that have involved collaboration with the wide range of organizations that are also committed to the public humanities.

We are reaching out to ask for examples of projects that connect the humanities with the broader community.

If you have been involved with or know of any projects that fit this description, we would be grateful if you could please contact Daniel Fisher, Project Director (dfisher@nhalliance.org).

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This project has received generous support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 9:36am by Erik Shell.

This article was originally published in Amphora 11.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 12:00am by Yongyi Li.

Olympiodorus of Alexandria: exegete, teacher, philosopher

Utrecht University (NL), 14-15 December 2017

Olympiodorus of Alexandria, who is often considered to have been the last leading, non-Christian philosopher of classical antiquity, has also been termed ‘the first classicist’ (Tarrant 1997). His place in the history of thought brings into focus issues of doctrinal difference and toleration, of the value of philosophical tradition, and of pedagogical concern for those coming of age in uncertain times. But there is more to Olympiodorus than the times in which he lived. His commentaries on Plato’s First Alcibiades, Gorgias and Phaedo, and on Aristotle’s Categories and Meteorology are now becoming better known and explored. Recent scholarship has also reopened the question of Olympiodorus’ philosophical calibre. There is reason enough, then, to try to present an all-round picture of Olympiodorus, as this conference intends to do.

Confirmed speakers include:
Bert van den Berg
Michael Griffin
Pauliina Remes
François Renaud
Anne Sheppard
Carlos Steel
Harold Tarrant
Cristina Viano

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 08/10/2017 - 8:21am by Erik Shell.

Please see the following important deadlines for SCS prizes and Annual Meeting Travel Stipend Awards:

Nominations for the Excellence in Precollegiate Teaching Awards are due by September 8.

Nominations for the Outreach Prize are due by September 18.

We are delighted that we will be able to offer a total of $21,000 in funding for graduate students and contingent faculty participating in the Annual Meeting next January.  Of this amount, $12,500 is designated for contingent faculty in accordance with the wishes of a generous donor.  If you are a graduate student or contingent faculty member presenting a paper, organizing a panel, roundtable discussion or workshop, or serving on a SCS committee, and if you will not receive travel funding from your academic institution, you are eligible for these funds.  

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 08/07/2017 - 1:11pm by Helen Cullyer.

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