Sneak Peek: TAPA 147.1

Forthcoming in TAPA 147.1 (Spring 2017)

P. J. Finglass, “Euripides’ Oedipus: A Response to Liapis”
This article examines the hypothesis, recently advanced by Vayos Liapis in this journal (TAPA 144: 307-70), that most of the quotation fragments of Euripides’ Oedipus belong not to that play but to a much later rhetorical exercise. It argues that the overwhelming majority of the faults alleged by Liapis are fully compatible with Euripidean language and style; and that even if the authenticity of one or two fragments can be called into question, there is no evidence to support the view that they come from a work written centuries after Euripides’ death.

Eric Dugdale, “Of This and That: The Recognition Formula in Sophocles’ Electra”
This paper offers an analysis of recognition in Sophocles’ Electra. It identifies a particular verbal element marking many recognitions in tragedy: referred to as the recognition formula, it typically pairs proximal and distal deictics (e.g., ὅδ᾿ ἐστίν ... κεῖνος, Soph. OT 1145), and is mentioned in Aristotle’s discussion of recognition (οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, Poetics 1448b17). Its occurrence at key moments in Sophocles’ Electra highlights the spatial relocation of the returning exile Orestes. It also points to the play’s interest in deception and the implications of this for recognition, and broadens our understanding of what constitutes recognition beyond the single “recognition scene.”

Chun-liong Ng, “Plato’s Defense of Athens”
This paper argues that in the Statesman Plato recognizes a complementary relationship between democracy and law. Reinventing the metaphors involving physicians and pilots, Plato brings the issue of trust back to his theoretical agenda. This radical thought experiment has anti-intellectual implications: the people should put their trust in the body of law drawn up by themselves rather than following the professionals, whose motivations are not always pure. The Statesman incorporates Plato’s experience of post-Socratic Athens. It presents a unique defense of democracy; its anti-intellectual elements do not appear in Plato’s other discussions of democracy, the Protagoras and the Laws.

Brian Walters, “The Circulation and Delivery of Cicero’s Post Reditum ad Populum”
This article calls into question recent suggestions that Cicero circulated but failed to deliver the Post reditum ad populum. Cicero’s own habits, late-Republican practices of publication, and the political necessities of the moment make such claims unlikely. The various contradictions in the surviving oration are easily resolved if we posit an early circulation, that is, of a pre-delivery version of the speech. Suspected omissions in Cicero’s account of the delivery of the speech are shown to be illusory. The speech of thanks to the people was delivered, as Cicero himself tells us, on 7 September 57 BCE.

John M. Oksanish, “Amant Alterna Camenae: Vergil’s Third Eclogue at the Dawn of Roman Literary History”
In Eclogue 3, Vergil flags the rough verses of his quarreling shepherds as alterna, evoking similar songs in aetiologies of early drama in the Georgics, in Livy, and in Horace. These later treatments often set early Italian practices against their foreign (especially Greek) counterparts to interrogate contemporary literary and social concerns. I argue that Eclogue 3—albeit with pastoral obliqueness—does the same, adumbrating a discomfort with indigenous Italian coarseness. My conclusion reassesses the significance of Palaemon’s judgment (e.g., his award of the vitula to both herdsmen) in the context of Roman literary history.

John K. Schafer, “Authorial Pagination in the Eclogues and Georgics”
A meaningful and authorial disposition of these works onto the columns of script (paginae) of a papyrus roll can be recovered from their text: 36 lines per column for the Eclogues, 40 for the Georgics. The pagination is an artistic feature of the works: the text mimetically responds to and comments on its column-breaks, investing the column and margins with various figurative valences. Lines at column-breaks are anomalous in several ways. These phenomena are too frequent and rich to be coincidental; at least some early copies of the text will have borne this arrangement.

Amanda Coles, “Between Patronage and Prejudice: Freedman Magistrates in the Late Roman Republic and Empire”
From the Late Republic to High Empire, inscriptions attest to seventeen freed magistrates, including quaestors, aediles, duoviri, octoviri, and quattuorviri, from colonies, oppida, and municipia in Greece, Macedonia, Illyria, Africa, and Italy. These examples obviate the assumption that freedmen could only hold office in a Caesarian colony before the lex Visellia (24 CE). Rather, individual freedmen were elected thanks to patronage, public benefactions, and a local preference for economic success over traditional, aristocratic hierarchies such as Rome’s. The fact that Roman customs and laws did not govern all colonies or municipia equally demonstrates the flexibility of Roman imperialism.

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THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, 8-9 December 2017

We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in constant interaction with others. A series of theoretical models have been developed to explain these contacts, which in recent years have been utilized to understand the ancient world. In the context of the Roman empire, these theories are typically used to examine the interactions of various indigenous populations with their rulers. These kinds of studies were once grouped under the heading “Romanization”, though the increased questioning of the term’s validity has given rise to a diverse range of alternatives. These are often drawn from modern theoretical backgrounds: multiculturalism and multilingualism are two recent concepts employed in this realm.

The aim of this conference is to assess the validity and scope of a variety of some of these models, with a particular focus on multilingualism and multiculturalism. By promoting and facilitating dialogue between disciplines, we shall aim to provide effective tools for different fields’ approaches in parallel (e.g. historical and linguistic). This has already been done very successfully in a few cases (e.g. ‘code-switching’), though greater interaction remains a desideratum. It is hoped that the participants will thereby open the discussion for a ‘theory of contact’ in the Roman world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.

The Atlas Project of Roman Aqueducts (ROMAQ) is an initiative to collect published information about Roman aqueducts from the period of 400 BC to 400 AD. The project website was developed between 2004 and 2011, but the database and other efforts do not appear to have been actively updated since 2013. As it stands, the project’s scope is limited to large aqueducts that served cities and towns, excluding smaller aqueducts that served areas like villas and mines. The need for such a project, as the authors highlight on the landing page, is four-fold:

  • aqueducts are important as cultural heritage;
  • bibliographic resources on aqueducts are in many languages and can be difficult to access;
  • aqueducts provide data for scientific topics like hydrology, geology, and engineering;
  • aqueducts are vulnerable to destruction.

The ROMAQ team particularly hoped that the compilation of information about aqueducts and their locations might reduce intentional and accidental damage.

The ROMAQ website has three parts: a map, the database of aqueducts, and a list of references.

The Map

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 7:03pm by Jacqueline DiBiasie Sammons.

Presidential Letter

June 19, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Recent weeks and months have seen an increase in the cultural tensions in our nation—and, indeed, the world.  It is not uncommon now for disagreements to escalate quickly into verbal attacks, threats of violence, and even—as recently took place in Washington, DC—actual violence.  Unquestionably, this tendency has been facilitated by social media.  But our digital media are only a means or instrument.  More troubling is the mentality fueling the rush to attack, across the political spectrum; and that is an unwillingness to verify information, weigh arguments, and attempt to make independent, rationally-grounded judgments.  These habits of mind are the very bedrock of learning and of scholarship; they are the principles on which the SCS, as a learned society, is founded and which we have a duty to uphold and protect.  

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 11:11am by Helen Cullyer.

Beginning on Monday, June 26, the SCS Placement Service will enter its yearly maintenance session. That means that no new jobs will be posted and no jobs digests will be sent to subscribers for approximately two weeks.  All job ads placed prior to June 26 will be made public so that they are still accessible.  

We hope to reopen the Service after two weeks on Monday, July 10th. During the maintenance period we will implement some much-needed and frequently requested improvements, the details of which will be laid out in full when the Service reopens.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact the Placement Coordinator Erik Shell at erik.shell@nyu.edu

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 06/16/2017 - 9:50am by Erik Shell.

NEH Logo

The American Numismatic Society has released a free article from their ANS Magazine publication discussing the relationship between the American Numismatic Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

You can read the article here: http://numismatics.org/pocketchange/neh-issue/

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(Photo: "2010 Logo fof the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities, in the public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/15/2017 - 9:03am by Erik Shell.

Detail of bust in the Centrale Monemartini Museum

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

It is a great time to be a fan of both the classical world and heavy metal music: the two have never overlapped to the extent that they do right now. Consider, for example, the fact that in 2013 not one but two Italian metal bands, Heimdall and Stormlord, released concept albums based on Vergil’s Aeneid.

But this overlap is not a new phenomenon—in fact, far from it. Heavy metal music has drawn on the classical world almost from its very beginnings, and this interest in the classical world is part of a larger obsession with other times and places—both real and imagined— that is a defining characteristic of the genre. And since metal is a conservative genre (there are clear forefathers to whom almost all subsequent bands owe and acknowledge their allegiance), the interest in these kinds of subjects by earlier bands sanctioned continuous use of them by all subsequent bands.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/12/2017 - 12:00am by Kristopher Fletcher.

The Vergilian Society is soliciting proposals for the Third Annual Symposium Campanum, to take place at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma in mid-October, 2018. We will consider proposals on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art and architecture, and geology of Italy and Sicily from the remotest antiquity to the Renaissance.

Each proposal should be prepared by the person who is intending to direct the symposium, or by the lead person if co-directors are envisioned.  The successful director will have logistical assistance from the Vergilian Society’s Italian staff and from the executive committee; a set of guidelines is available to assist in planning.

Proposals should be 250-300 words in length, giving a brief rationale for the theme, some thoughts on what kinds of subjects are likely to be treated, and the names of several scholars who have worked on this theme and might be approached to participate.  As international meetings, our symposia attract participants from all over the world, but since the Vergilian Society is an Italian-American cultural association, we are especially interested in seeing solid participation from scholars in these two countries.

Proposals should be submitted electronically by September 21, 2017 (new deadline!) to the president of the Vergilian Society, James O’Hara, at jimohara@unc.edu.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/07/2017 - 3:23pm by Erik Shell.

The Celtic Conference in Classics in Montreal (July 19-21, 2017) has set its conference program. The panels and their speakers can be found at www.celticconferenceclassics.com. Panels cover a broad range of current debates in Classics including the problem of the fragmentary, epic and elegy, reception of classical drama, oratory and identity, ethnicity and imperialism, new directions in Plato, consciousness in Late Antiquity, and popular classics, to name a few. The CCC2017 cordially invites students, scholars, and interested parties to participate in the proceedings and enjoy collegial conversations on all things Classical.

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/07/2017 - 9:53am by Erik Shell.

Ruth Scodel, SCS delegate to the American Council of Learned Societies, has written up her report of the annual ACLS meeting.

You can read the full here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 06/05/2017 - 12:56pm by Erik Shell.

It is a pleasure to announce the tenth edition of Eleatica, International Session on Ancient Philosophy, to be held on 28th-30th September 2017 at the Fondazione Alario per Elea-Velia onlus (Ascea Marina, Salerno, Italy). This time the main lectures will be given by Prof. Livio Rossetti (Università di Perugia).

Here is the conference programme:

28th September 2017

09:00 a.m. Courtyard of Palazzo Alario: Registration.
10:00 a.m. Palazzo Alario, Sala Francesco Alario: Opening Ceremony
                  Marcello D’Aiuto (President of the Fondazione Alario per Elea-Velia onlus).
                  Stefania Giombini (Scientific Committee of Eleatica)
10:15 a.m. De Novis Libris, in quibus de Praesocraticis tractatur, Iudicia – Some new books on ancient philosophy
Chair: Omar Álvarez Salas (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).
04:00 p.m. 1st Lecture. Livio Rossetti: La filosofia virtuale di Parmenide
Chair: Massimo Pulpito (Univ. Brasilia, Cátedra UNESCO Archai)
Discussant: Luis A. Bredlow (Universitat de Barcelona)
                  Open discussion

29th September 2017

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 06/05/2017 - 10:02am by Erik Shell.

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Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
Presidential Letters
SCS Announcements
Beginning on Monday, June 26, the SCS Placement Service will enter its yearly
Classics in the News
The American Numismatic Society has released a free article from their AN

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