Sneak Peek: TAPA 147.1

Forthcoming in TAPA 147.1 (Spring 2017)

P. J. Finglass, “Euripides’ Oedipus: A Response to Liapis”
This article examines the hypothesis, recently advanced by Vayos Liapis in this journal (TAPA 144: 307-70), that most of the quotation fragments of Euripides’ Oedipus belong not to that play but to a much later rhetorical exercise. It argues that the overwhelming majority of the faults alleged by Liapis are fully compatible with Euripidean language and style; and that even if the authenticity of one or two fragments can be called into question, there is no evidence to support the view that they come from a work written centuries after Euripides’ death.

Eric Dugdale, “Of This and That: The Recognition Formula in Sophocles’ Electra”
This paper offers an analysis of recognition in Sophocles’ Electra. It identifies a particular verbal element marking many recognitions in tragedy: referred to as the recognition formula, it typically pairs proximal and distal deictics (e.g., ὅδ᾿ ἐστίν ... κεῖνος, Soph. OT 1145), and is mentioned in Aristotle’s discussion of recognition (οὗτος ἐκεῖνος, Poetics 1448b17). Its occurrence at key moments in Sophocles’ Electra highlights the spatial relocation of the returning exile Orestes. It also points to the play’s interest in deception and the implications of this for recognition, and broadens our understanding of what constitutes recognition beyond the single “recognition scene.”

Chun-liong Ng, “Plato’s Defense of Athens”
This paper argues that in the Statesman Plato recognizes a complementary relationship between democracy and law. Reinventing the metaphors involving physicians and pilots, Plato brings the issue of trust back to his theoretical agenda. This radical thought experiment has anti-intellectual implications: the people should put their trust in the body of law drawn up by themselves rather than following the professionals, whose motivations are not always pure. The Statesman incorporates Plato’s experience of post-Socratic Athens. It presents a unique defense of democracy; its anti-intellectual elements do not appear in Plato’s other discussions of democracy, the Protagoras and the Laws.

Brian Walters, “The Circulation and Delivery of Cicero’s Post Reditum ad Populum”
This article calls into question recent suggestions that Cicero circulated but failed to deliver the Post reditum ad populum. Cicero’s own habits, late-Republican practices of publication, and the political necessities of the moment make such claims unlikely. The various contradictions in the surviving oration are easily resolved if we posit an early circulation, that is, of a pre-delivery version of the speech. Suspected omissions in Cicero’s account of the delivery of the speech are shown to be illusory. The speech of thanks to the people was delivered, as Cicero himself tells us, on 7 September 57 BCE.

John M. Oksanish, “Amant Alterna Camenae: Vergil’s Third Eclogue at the Dawn of Roman Literary History”
In Eclogue 3, Vergil flags the rough verses of his quarreling shepherds as alterna, evoking similar songs in aetiologies of early drama in the Georgics, in Livy, and in Horace. These later treatments often set early Italian practices against their foreign (especially Greek) counterparts to interrogate contemporary literary and social concerns. I argue that Eclogue 3—albeit with pastoral obliqueness—does the same, adumbrating a discomfort with indigenous Italian coarseness. My conclusion reassesses the significance of Palaemon’s judgment (e.g., his award of the vitula to both herdsmen) in the context of Roman literary history.

John K. Schafer, “Authorial Pagination in the Eclogues and Georgics”
A meaningful and authorial disposition of these works onto the columns of script (paginae) of a papyrus roll can be recovered from their text: 36 lines per column for the Eclogues, 40 for the Georgics. The pagination is an artistic feature of the works: the text mimetically responds to and comments on its column-breaks, investing the column and margins with various figurative valences. Lines at column-breaks are anomalous in several ways. These phenomena are too frequent and rich to be coincidental; at least some early copies of the text will have borne this arrangement.

Amanda Coles, “Between Patronage and Prejudice: Freedman Magistrates in the Late Roman Republic and Empire”
From the Late Republic to High Empire, inscriptions attest to seventeen freed magistrates, including quaestors, aediles, duoviri, octoviri, and quattuorviri, from colonies, oppida, and municipia in Greece, Macedonia, Illyria, Africa, and Italy. These examples obviate the assumption that freedmen could only hold office in a Caesarian colony before the lex Visellia (24 CE). Rather, individual freedmen were elected thanks to patronage, public benefactions, and a local preference for economic success over traditional, aristocratic hierarchies such as Rome’s. The fact that Roman customs and laws did not govern all colonies or municipia equally demonstrates the flexibility of Roman imperialism.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Call for Papers: Southern Association for the History of Medicine and Science (SAHMS) Twentieth Annual Meeting, at Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia, February 15-17, 2018

Deadline for paper abstracts, panel submissions, and student travel grants is: November 1st, 2017. The Program Committee will notify you as to whether or not your paper is accepted no later than November 16th, 2017.

Submissions for individual papers and panels can be made online at the SAHMS website, at http://www.sahms.net/call-for-papers.html.

SAHMS is seeking paper submissions from students (including undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, and medical and health sciences professional students), professors, medical and legal professionals, and independent scholars with an academic interest in the history of science or medicine.

SAHMS welcomes papers that discuss the history of medicine and/or science. This is broadly construed to encompass all fields and subfields historical, literary, anthropological, philosophical, legal, and sociological related to the historical understanding of any aspect of science, medicine, health care, and the medical and health science professions, as well as closely related topics, including issues related to science or medicine involving race, disabilities, sustainability, environment, technology, and gender studies.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/18/2017 - 2:15pm by Erik Shell.

Statement from the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), American Alliance of Museums (AAM), American Anthropological Association (AAA), American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR), Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD), Society for Classical Studies (SCS), and U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield (USCBS) Regarding the United States of America’s Intention to Withdraw from UNESCO.

On October 12, 2017, the United States announced its decision to withdraw from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2018. A founding member of the Organization in 1945, the United States has benefited from UNESCO’s guiding precepts and principles in its efforts to preserve humanity’s shared heritage.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/18/2017 - 9:01am by Erik Shell.

(From John Finamore, University of Iowa)

Dear ISNS Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the call for panels for the 16th annual ISNS conference, to be held in Los Angeles on June 13-16, 2018, in conjunction with Loyola Marymount University.

Anyone interested in organizing a panel at the conference should send a brief description of the panel along with its title and the name(s) and email address(es) of the contact person(s) to the conference organizers:

Panel descriptions are due to us by January 22, 2018.  I will email the list of proposed panels to the ISNS membership before February 5. Panel organizers are responsible for choosing and collecting abstracts for their panels. They should notify the organizers of their decisions by February 26.  Abstracts should be no more than one page, single spaced.

We also welcome individual abstracts for papers that do not fall under any of the announced panels.  Please send those abstracts (again, one-page maximum) to the four conference organizers above.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 9:11am by Erik Shell.

Roman Inscriptions of Britain is a digitally-enhanced version of R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright’s Roman Inscriptions of Britain, vol. 1 (1965), and its 2,400 inscriptions. It includes all subsequent Addenda and Corrigenda to volume 1. Volumes 2 (1990–1995, instrumentum domesticum) and 3 (2009, more recent finds) are not yet available online, but all the major Roman inscriptions of Britain are included here. Since the work of editing, preparing, and composing commentary for the inscriptions had already been done, the site’s creator, Scott Vanderbilt, could focus the interface, and on applying TEI and EpiDoc markups. The result is a rich, interactive website: a powerful tool for scholars and students, and a delight to even casual visitors.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:00am by Rebecca R. Benefiel.

Ancient Philosophy Society
18th Annual Independent Meeting

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
April 26-April 29, 2018

Honoring the richness of the American and European philosophical traditions, the Ancient Philosophy Society encourages submissions from a variety of interpretive perspectives. Phenomenological, postmodern, Anglo-American, Straussian, Tübingen School, hermeneutic, psychoanalytic, queer, feminist, and any other interpretations of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical and literary works are welcome.
Please submit papers by e-mail attachment to APS2018@emory.edu. Deadline: November 22, 2017. The author’s name, institution, and references pertaining to the identity of the author must be omitted from the paper, notes, and bibliography. The e-mail accompanying the submission must include the author’s name, the title of the paper, address, telephone, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:24am by Erik Shell.

The Annual Meeting page for our 150th meeting in San Diego, CA is now live. This page will be the hub for all news and developments for our 2019 meeting, which marks our historic Sesquicentennial.

Listed there already are the Calls for Abstracts for the Affiiliated Group Panels, the Organizer-Refereed Panels, and the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 2:29pm by Erik Shell.

Seventh Annual Tennessee Undergraduate Classics Research Conference--Call for Papers

This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based on the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, art, etc.) or a related field, including interdisciplinary topics or topics in Egyptology and the ancient Near East. Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).

Submission of Abstracts

Abstracts are due by 5:00pm EST on Monday, November 13, 2017 to clasclub@utk.edu. You must also fill out and submit an information sheet via Google Forms. The Google Form can be found here. Notifications of acceptance will be sent on Friday, December 1, 2017. Click here for a guide for abstract submissions.

Abstract Details

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:24am by Erik Shell.

Thresholds in Literature and the Arts
International Conference

Centre for Classical Studies – Centre for Comparative Studies
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon (Portugal)
June 2018, 7-8

During the last century the concept of “liminality” has gained increasing attention in many disciplines, from psychology to anthropology, from philosophy to literary and cultural studies. But the state that the word defines is much older than the word itself. Suffice it to think of the myths, heroes and gods related to the katabasis and other forms of passage in ancient Greek and Latin cultures, to get a hint of the historical depth of such a concept.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.

August 2012: a Latinist, a scholar of Chinese martial arts novels, a classical Persianist, a historian of early Vietnam, a Renaissance literature scholar, an archaeologist of pre-modern Malaya, and a post-colonial literature specialist assembled in New Haven. It was just like a gathering of Marvel’s AvengersTM, but with less spandex. We gathered not to save the world, but to read it: in their Olympian wisdom (to mix mythological universes), President Richard Levin of Yale University and President Tan Chorh Chuan of National University of Singapore had decided to establish Yale-NUS College, a jointly founded small liberal arts college located in Singapore. Their goal was to create a new model for higher education in a globalized future (or something Davos-y like that): our job was to design and eventually teach an interdisciplinary humanities first-year course called “Literature and Humanities,” one half of a yearlong Great Works sequence.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am by Mira Seo.

Cyprus: a Place and Topos in Ancient Literature

Whether it was love, war, struggle or simply a breathtaking landscape that inspired authors in antiquity, Cyprus had it all. Greek and Latin literature abounds with references to the island: the land of kings and heroes and, most importantly, the birthplace of Aphrodite/Venus, Cyprus offers to ancient authors numerous sources of inspiration - Teucer, Evagoras, Pygmalion, Cinyras, Myrrha, Adonis, to name but a few. At the same time, Cyprus the place has a unique cultural identity, shaped under the multiple interrelations, contacts and assimilations of indigenous Cypriot, Greek, and Eastern elements. Similar is the shaping of the linguistic landscape of the island.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:38pm by Erik Shell.

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