Special Events at the 2018 Annual Meeting

We've put together a list of the special events that will take place at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Note that, while paper sessions will take place in the Marriott, a large portion of the evening events will be housed in the Westin.

The upcoming December Newsletter from the SCS office will have more information about these and other events at the Annual Meeting.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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IPS North America (https://ipsnortham.org/)

The second meeting of the North American Sections of the International Plutarch Society will take place 15-18 May 2019 at Utah State University in Logan Utah.

ABOUT THE EVENT

The second meeting of the North American Sections of the International Plutarch Society will take place 15-18 May 2019 at Utah State University in Logan Utah. Logan is ninety minutes north of the Salt Lake City International hub airport and convenient to many national parks and other attractions. Plenary sessions will examine the topic of "Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" in tranquil and beautiful mountain settings as we conclude our meeting in the former mining town of Park City, Utah.
 
ABOUT OUR TOPIC
 
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" asks us to consider those times in the Parallel Lives or Moralia when we are surprised that Plutarch does not say something, or when he leaves something out. Whether this occurs by mistake or by design in Plutarch's work, we propose focusing on those passages that foil our expectations or whose silence invites a closer examination. We would also like to consider other odd omissions, perhaps of authors or works, or places even, that Plutarch might be expected to know, or even suspected of knowing.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 09/10/2018 - 9:11am by Erik Shell.

The Humanities Without Walls (HWW) Consortium is pleased to announce that the Call for Applications for the 2019 National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop is now available at the HWW website.

These workshops showcase opportunities beyond the walls of the academy and encourage humanities doctoral students to think of themselves as agents of the public humanities. In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

Learn more about the HWW Career Diversity Workshop

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 09/10/2018 - 9:02am by Erik Shell.

The Izmir Center of the Archaeology of Western Anatolia (EKVAM) is glad to inform you that an international symposium on oil lamps in Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and early Byzantine Anatolia, will take place on May 16-17, 2019 at the Dokuz Eylül University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. Ancient oil lamps, especially produced by clay, were found in relatively large quantities in entire Anatolia, where they were produced between the Bronze Age and Medieval periods. So far the study of this implement has been overlooked in Anatolia whereas there is still a huge amount of unpublished material from excavations, field surveys and museums in Turkey. Ancient Anatolian oil lamps can be categorized based on different criteria, including material (terracotta, bronze, glass, lead and stone etc.), production (wheel-made or mould-made), typology, fabric, decoration, production, use and distribution. During the Archaic and Classical periods (i.e. seventh to mid-fourth century B.C.) handleless, round, wheel-made terracotta oil lamps were produced locally especially in the western Anatolia or imported in large scale. During the Hellenistic and Roman periods Anatolian lamps were produced more frequently as mould-made and typologically they have numerous varieties. In these periods oil lamps were utilised for profane and religious purposes, especially as tomb votives. During the mid-sixth/early seventh century A.D. the form of lamps was changed in Anatolia radically.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/10/2018 - 8:51am by Erik Shell.

by Roberta Stewart

Editor's Note: As we look forward to the 2019 Sesquicentennial meeting, Amphora is reprinting an article by 2017 Outreach Prize winner Professor Roberta Stewart of Dartmouth College about her work in developing book discussion groups on the Homeric poems with military veterans. Professor Stewart's long-running initiative is now a major collaborative project of Dartmouth College and New Hampshire Humanities, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This article, re-printed here without change, was originally published in Amphora in 2015. Readers can find Professor Stewart's outreach prize citation here.

For the past seven years, small groups of combat veterans in the Upper Valley of New Hampshire and Vermont have been making Homer their own. This article details the particular value of these small book groups for the veteran, for the community, and for me as the academic facilitator.

The proposal for the book groups originated from the premise that literature is able to provide useful insight into life experience and, more specifically, that Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey provide valuable insight—2800 years old—into the problems of soldiers who individually and collectively experienced deep internal conflicts while deployed (Iliad) and who needed somehow to get home (Odyssey). Homer provides a salutary distancing and deflection that, I believe, allows the problems of homecoming to emerge more clearly as a historical problem of the human condition across cultures and political or social organizations: the problem of homecoming is a product of war.

The Homer book groups that I run are small (8-12 vets) but the ideas are large: life, or our daily lived experience, happens between the big events; and narratives, or figured worlds, conjure, create, and sustain lived experience (Holland and Skinner 1998); dialogic engagement with the text of Homer creates narratives, or figured worlds of return, and may help the daily experience of return and reintegration for combat veterans. Practically I bring the world of the liberal arts curriculum, namely philology as the art of reading slowly (Nietzsche), to a group outside of the liberal arts college. I teach veterans how to have a relationship with a piece of ancient literature and in the process I teach how to create a community that is founded upon a shared intellectual experience.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 09/08/2018 - 9:22pm by Wells Hansen.

Eleatic Ontology: Origin and Reception is a multi-volume publication project supported by UNESCO and the Universidade de Brasilia.

The central idea of Eleatic Ontology: Origin and Reception is to gather in one editorial product a description of Eleatic ontology, its first developments, and its lasting and powerful influence on all western thought. The project will do this by inviting and drawing on scholarly articles from the international academic community. 

The work is divided into 4 major periods. One volume will be devoted to each. We currently seek submissions of proposals for Volume One, Eleatic Ontology in Ancient Philosophy. Volume I will cover the period from Parmenides, Zeno, and Melissus through late antiquity.

We invite submissions of proposals. Authors are invited to submit extended abstracts (500-700 words, better if combined with a shorter abstract) in English as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file prepared for blind review. Please, provide also information about your affiliation and contact details in a separate file. All of that should be submitted to eonvol1@gmail.com.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:59pm by Erik Shell.
Call for Papers
Classical Representations in Popular Culture
Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)
Area Chair: Benjamin S. Haller (bhaller@vwu.edu)

40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019
Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 40th annual SWPACA conference.  One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels.  For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

Papers on any aspect of Greek, Roman, or Mediterranean antiquity in contemporary or popular culture are eligible for consideration.

Potential topics include representations of ancient literature or culture in:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:49pm by Erik Shell.
West Coast Plato Workshop
Plato's Protagoras
 
The 2019 West Coast Plato Workshop will be dedicated to studies of Plato’s Protagoras. It will take place 24-26 May, 2019, at San Diego State University in San Diego, California. (Please see attached call for papers and commentators.)

Submissions should consist in two separate pages: (i) the title of the paper, name(s), academic rank(s), affiliation(s), and email contact(s) of author(s); (ii) title and 500-word abstract prepared for blind review. Submissions should be double-spaced and 12-pitch, in MSWord, PDF, or RTF formats only.

Refereeing for submissions will be blind and will be done by past and present hosts of the WCPW. Final selection will attempt to achieve a good balance of participants (senior and junior faculty as well as graduate students).

We are also soliciting volunteers for commentators on papers.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: OCTOBER 1, 2018

Please send paper proposals or volunteer as a commentator to: mark.wheeler@sdsu.edu

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:36pm by Erik Shell.

Newberry Fellowships

The Newberry Library's long-standing fellowship program provides outstanding scholars with the time, space, and community required to pursue innovative and ground-breaking scholarship. In addition to the Library's collections, fellows are supported by a collegial interdisciplinary community of researchers, curators, and librarians. An array of scholarly and public programs also contributes to an engaging intellectual environment.

We invite interested individuals who wish to utilize the Newberry's collection to apply for our many fellowship opportunities. Short-Term Fellowships are available to postdoctoral scholars, PhD candidates, and those who hold other terminal degrees. Short-Term Fellowships are generally awarded for 1 to 2 months, and unless otherwise noted the stipend is $2,500 per month. These fellowships support individual scholarly research for those who have a specific need for the Newberry's collection and are mainly restricted to individuals who live and work outside of the Chicago metropolitan area.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:29pm by Erik Shell.
Center for Hellenic Studies, from Podgorica (Montenegro) is happy to announce the international conference on the topic "Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe", to be held in Herceg Novi (Montenegro), from 29 September to 04 October 2019.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:23pm by Erik Shell.
"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Calling all actors—designers—creatives organized and not—to join us in

Aristophanes' Assemblywomen

Translated by Jeffrey Henderson

Directed by Krishni Burns and Lizzy Ten-Hove
Friday, January 4, 2019
SCS/AIA Annual Meeting, San Diego

The Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance's annual tradition of staged readings at the annual general meeting will continue this year with a production of Aristophanes' Assemblywomen!

Praxagora and the women of Athens covertly seize control of the Athenian government and begin implementing a series of bold reforms. The long-disenfranchised women's interventions transform the city from flawed, yet functional, state to utter chaos. In the true Athenian tradition of using women to think with, the production will parallel the play’s themes to posit a possible future scenario in the US political system. Like the men of Athens, groups in power have been systematically undermining public and civic education, while we, the underinformed electorate, tend to vote in our own immediate interests without fully understanding the ramifications of new policies and promises. In the wake of #metoo and the 2018 "Year of the Woman" midterms, the play's gender dynamics are especially thought provoking and timely.

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Fri, 09/07/2018 - 2:20pm by Erik Shell.

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