Statement Opposing U.S. Proposal to Tax Tuition Waivers

The Society for Classical Studies has signed on to a statement urging Congress to reject the proposed tax on graduate student tuition waivers.
 
You can read the full statement and list of signatories here:
 
 
 

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We are saddened to report the passing of Dr. Vincent J. Rosivach, SCS Life Member and very active member of CANE.

"His legacy in the humanities and the College of Arts and Sciences will continue, and students are encouraged to honor his legacy by continuing to foster their education and immerse themselves into the wonders of classical history and literature."

You can read his full obituary on the Fairfield Mirror here: http://fairfieldmirror.com/news/longtime-fairfield-professor-passes-away/

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 8:32am by Erik Shell.

A Day in the Life of A Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog, celebrating the working lives of classicists.

Nadya Williams is Associate Professor of History at the University of West Georgia.

As an academic who is also a homeschooling mom, crazy is the normal for me.  I am married to another academic, and thus we set our schedule together. To make sure that we have at least some time together as a family, we start the day with a family breakfast around 8 am. By 9 am, the 12-year-old starts his homeschooling day (he has a list of assignments to work through, and I check as needed), and I start the work day. Sometimes the toddler gets out his toy computer, and starts pounding on it in imitation of mama typing. Solidarity!

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/18/2018 - 4:24pm by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.

The deadline to submit an individual abstract for the 2019 SCS Annual Meeting in San Diego is 11:59p.m. on Wednesday, April 25th

SCS members can submit their abstracts via the Program Submission Site here: https://program.classicalstudies.org/

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 04/17/2018 - 2:52pm by Erik Shell.

Latin Lexicography Summer Workshop: 30 July – 4 August, 2018

Thesaurus linguae Latinae Institute

Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Munich

                The Thesaurus linguae Latinae Institute announces its first annual Latin Lexicography Workshop, a one-week event in Munich, July 30 to August 4, 2018. We invite participation by researchers at any stage in their career whose work involves the rigorous evaluation of Latin words in any aspect, ranging from their use in specific texts or their changing significance across the entire corpus of ancient Latin. In addition to philology, relevant disciplines include conceptual and intellectual history, epigraphy, linguistics, literary and textual criticism, medieval and Renaissance studies, philosophy, and theology.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/16/2018 - 8:48am by Erik Shell.
Header: Achilles cedes Briseis to Agamemnon, from the House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii, fresco, 1st century CE (Naples National Archaeological Museum. Image via Wikimedia and is in the Public Domain)

Troy: Fall of a City is a joint effort by Netflix and the BBC to repackage the Trojan War story as the next season of Game of Thrones. Producers David Farr, Derek Wax, and Christopher Aird didn’t have dig too deep to find the material they needed within the ancient myth: blood-thirsty kings, violent battle scenes, forbidden love, and powerful beings flying down from the sky. The Epic Cycle has it all and, since Troy (2004, starring Brad Pitt) hit the theaters nearly 15 years ago, perhaps we were due for another rendering.

Released in the U.S. on April 6th, the 8-episode series is ambitious, to say the least. Its writers wanted to tell the story of the fall of the mythological city of Troy and this, perhaps, is a bit hubristic. After all, Homer’s Iliad (which consists of over 15,000 lines of poetry and would have taken over 15 hours to perform) only covers the “wrath of Achilles,” roughly a 40-day period near the end of the 10-year war. But Troy: Fall of a City has restricted its plot substantially. Rather than including as many heroes and all of the scenes from the Iliad as they could, the writers chose to focus on Paris (aka Alexander, played by Louis Hunter) and Helen (Bella Dayne).

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 04/15/2018 - 5:22pm by Debra Trusty.
NEH Logo

April, 2018

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Jennifer Ferriss-Hill (University of Miami) - "The Ancient Roman Poet Horace's "Art of Poetry" and the Art of Living"
  • Heidi Morse (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) - "Black Women an the Classical Traditions of Greece and Rome in 19th-Century America"
  • Jenifer Neils (American School of Classical Studies at Athens) - "Long-term Research Fellowships at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens"
  • Dean Smith (Cornell University) - "Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University III"
  • Peter Meineck (Aquila Theatre Company Inc.) - "Citizen Soldiers: Ancient and Modern Expressions of War"
  • Aaron Johnson (Lee University) - "Philosophy and Tradition in the Contra Julianumby Cyril of Alexandria (c. 375-444)"
  • Jessica Powers (San Antonio Museum of Art) - "Sacred Landscapes: Visions of Nature and Myth in Ancient Rome"
  • Denise McCoskey (Miami University, Oxford) - "Eugenics and Classical Scholarship in Early 20th-Century America"

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 04/13/2018 - 9:25am by Erik Shell.

Seminar on Plato at Syracuse

June 4-5, 2018
Sicily Center for International Education, Siracusa

A seminar on Plato at Syracuse will be held in Siracusa, June 4-5, just before the Fourth Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece.  The goal of this project is to understand Plato’s involvement with Syracuse and Southern Italy in a multidisciplinary way and produce a volume which combines a new translation of the Seventh Letter with original essays from scholars of varying disciplines.

Scholars interested in participating in the seminar should contact Heather Reid, fontearetusa1@gmail.com, no later than May 1, 2018.  If you would like to propose a paper for the volume, you must provide a full-text draft (maximum 5,000 words) in Chicago style, prepared for blind review, before the May 1st deadline so we can include it in the seminar book.  You may contribute a paper without participating in the seminar and you may participate in the seminar without contributing a paper.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 2:43pm by Erik Shell.

Below are this year's Pedagogy Award winners and their projects.

Michael Okyere Asante (Stellenbosch University and University of Ghana)

  • The award supports travel costs from South Africa to London in order to present at the Classical Association Conference. The research explored two schools in Ghana and their integration of Classics into their curriculum.
Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) and Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
  • This award supports the work required for the digitization of Index Apuleianus by William Abbott Oldfather. The work will convert it into a fully lemmatized text and database.
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University): 
  • With this award Prof. Gellar-Goad will fund approximately 50 students’ travel to perform adaptations of Aristophanes and Plautus for the North Carolina Junior Classical League state convention in April 2019.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 2:26pm by Erik Shell.

A new Classics program has started up at Southern Virginia University. The university now offers a Major and Minor in Classical Studies, with classes in Greek and Latin as well as history, philosophy, and the arts.

Join us in congratulating them and the expansion of our field!

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(Photo: "Main Hall" by Carol M. Highsmith, public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.
Detail of Thalia from the Sarcophagus of the Muses, late 2nd century CE, Thassian marble, Archaeological Museum of Ostia. Photo taken by Krishni Burns, unpublished.

This blog entry is the first in a new series, Letters from CAMP, that will appear throughout the year and explore the various practicalities and benefits of the performance of ancient drama in its many forms.

Two years ago at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, a Senior Scholar of great distinction stood in the middle of a room crowded with many of the finest minds in classical scholarship, looked around, and said loudly, “Look at all these f**king a**holes.”  To the best of my knowledge, this was a first. Most scholars have been tempted to say the same when faced with a crowd of SCS conference goers, but most are a bit more circumspect in their language. 

In this instance, context is everything. The lady in question was performing the part of Poseidon, reworked in a modern aesthetic, at a staged reading of Aristophanes’ Birds organized by the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) in conjunction with Stanford Classics in Theater. Rather than gasping in shock, the audience laughed and applauded.  In the context of comedy, it’s possible to say what everyone might be thinking, with no harm done and no bones broken. 

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 4:25pm by Krishni Burns.

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