Launch of New Web Site

Thanks to the extraordinary efforts of Information Architect, Samuel Huskey, and to the programming and web designing skills of Confluence Corporation, we have launched a new web site with a new URL:  https://classicalstudies.org/.  Both the site and the URL reflect the Society’s new name and its effort to be more useful and accessible to both its members and to a wider audience of people interested in classical antiquity.  The site is easier to navigate and will present more opportunities for featuring and discussing new work in classics.  The site will also include all Placement Service operations.

To ensure that the site and our social media outlets are comprehensive and current, President John Marincola is appointing a new Communications Committee.  Once this Committee begins operations, I will publish contact information and procedures that members can use to make suggestions to its members.  In the interim, please send comments and suggestions to me (blistein@sas.upenn.edu). 

Streamlined Access for SCS Members

As before, much of the information on the SCS web site will be available to any visitor.  However, the new site will make it easier for members to become Placement Service candidates and subscribers at no charge and to enjoy other benefits exclusive to members because it will permit them to use a single set of credentials for all functions on the SCS web site and for all SCS-related activities on the Johns Hopkins University Press (JHUP) web site.  Members no longer need to create multiple online accounts for SCS.  Accounts already established or to be established at the JHUP web site will be the only credentials you need.

Members with Existing Accounts at JHUP.  If you have ever created an account on the JHUP web site, for example, to pay your dues via credit card or to view our directory of members, the username and password associated with that account will now give you access to the SCS web site as well.  If you need a reminder of either your username or password on the JHUP web site, click on the relevant link to request it. 

Members Needing to Create an Account at JHUPFollow this link to create an online account.  You will need both the e-mail address you gave to Johns Hopkins when you paid your dues and your member number.  If you need a reminder of your member number, click here

If you need further assistance from staff at Johns Hopkins, they can be reached in the following ways:

If you call JHUP and reach an answering machine, be sure to leave a message that includes a suggested time to call you back.  This will enable staff to follow up with you as soon as they can.

Site Navigation

Two menus appear at the top of every page on the site.  In the higher of the two, note especially the links for member log-in and for “SCS News”.  The former gives members access to the portions of the site that are set aside for them, and the latter (as the APA Blog did before) contains announcements of Society activities and other information for anyone interested in classics.  Clicking on SCS News will generate a list of the most recent announcements of all kinds, but the drop-down menu and search box above the first item on the list permit the user to obtain a specific range of entries.

The second menu, in white type on a blue background, gives links to the most commonly used functions on our site.  Each of these links contains a drop-down menu leading to a specific subtopic.  Clicking on the white text will also take the user to an introductory page where the links in the drop-down menu appear on the right hand side of the screen.  The menu on the right appears on many related interior pages as well.

Below the image on the main page only are four links to “landing pages”.  On these four pages we have attempted to place links to the information that we think will be most useful for our four overlapping constituencies:  members, professional classicists, classics students, and enthusiasts for classics.  For that reason some links appear on more than one landing page.  Underneath these four links are an additional link for the annual meeting, the most recent letter from the President, and a number of other useful links for the field. 

Further down the main page, we have also added a Member Spotlight that will feature information about a new member every few weeks.  To begin this new feature we have asked (first) Sara Forsdyke and (in a few weeks) Matt Roller, both of whom rotated off the Board last January as at-large Directors, to write about their service to the Society.  Members with suggestions for this new feature should write to me (blistein@sas.upenn.edu) for transmission to the new Communications Committee.

Members Only Page

The Members Only page contains links to the Directory of Members, to TAPA online, and to discounts on various publications and resources including our GreekKeys software.  To reach that page, first log in to the SCS web site, and then click on the drop-down menu under “Membership” or click on “Membership” itself.  You will then see a link labeled “For Members Only”.  Note that this link will not appear unless you are logged in.  Finally, if the resource you are seeking is on the Johns Hopkins site rather than our own (the Directory and TAPA are examples), you will need to enter your membership credentials again.

Placement Service

The 2015-2016 Placement Service is now open.  Before registering for the service, please read the information below about new features this year. 

As President Marincola announced in his most recent letter, SCS members may enroll as candidates or subscribers to the Placement Service at no charge for 2015-2016.  The Finance Committee and Board of Directors took this step enthusiastically as part of the Society’s efforts to provide as much assistance as possible to those members who have the least resources.  If you register, note that “candidates” have access to the full range of services provided to job-seekers, including the scheduling of interviews at the annual meeting.  We offer “subscriber” status to members who are not on the job market themselves but who want to monitor that market, usually because they are advising candidates in some capacity.  Nonmembers can again purchase either service for $55.

Candidates and subscribers should note carefully the information above about verifying membership before registering for the Service.  If you are not yet a member of the Society or if your dues are not current, the fastest way to gain access to a free subscription is to pay dues online, and then log in to the Placement Service using the credentials you create during the payment.

In part to recover some of the revenue that will be lost by offering candidates and subscriber services to members at no charge, the Society has increased the fees for institutions for the first time in several years.  Institutions purchasing Comprehensive Service (which includes facilities for conducting interviews at the annual meeting) will pay $475.  The fee for institutions simply placing an advertisement will be $200 until January 9 and $175 thereafter.  If you are purchasing an institutional service, note that individual or departmental membership is not required, and that membership brings no reduction in institutional fees. 

If you have used the Service in previous years, you know that candidates, subscribers, and comprehensive institutions used to receive an e-mail each night if we had approved any new job listings that day.  The e-mail list serve will operate in a slightly different manner this year.  A day or two after you register for the Service, you will receive an e-mail confirming your addition to the Placement list serve.  While your e-mail subscription will not be active immediately, you will have access to all published jobs by visiting the Placement Service pages once you are logged in and clicking on a link entitled “Job Ads for Placement Service Candidates”. 

In addition, once your e-mail subscription is active, you will receive an e-mail immediately after each new listing is approved.  These separate individual e-mails will replace the daily summary of jobs posted that we sent in previous years.

To register for the 2015-2016 Service, go to classicalstudies.org and then click on “Placement Service” in the menu with the blue background.  Scroll down to find either Services for Candidates and Subscribers or Services for Institutions, and click on the appropriate link.

Over the last two weeks, we published new job advertisements for 2015-2016 on last year’s Placement site.  I posted those listings again in SCS News and will continue to make them available there for about a week.  We ask that the institutions posting those advertisements now register for the Service and post them in the new online system.

Conclusion

I hope you will enjoy the new site.  Please send comments and reports of broken links to me (blistein@sas.upenn.edu). 

Adam D. Blistein
Executive Director

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The 2023 Alexander G. McKay Prize competition for the best new book in Vergilian studies is now open!

The Vergilian Society is pleased to announce the opening of the next competition for the Alexander G. McKay Prize for the best book in Vergilian studies. The prize, which is accompanied by a cash award of $500 or a life membership in the Vergilian Society (valued at $800), is awarded every other year to the book that, in the opinion of the prize evaluation committee, makes the greatest contribution toward our understanding and appreciation of Vergil or topics related to Vergil. Works of literary criticism, biography, bibliography, textual criticism, reference, history, archaeology, and the classical tradition are all eligible, provided that Vergilian studies represent a significant portion of the discussion. The current competition will cover books published during the years 2020 and 2021. The winner will be announced at the Vergilian Society session at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in New Orleans in January 2023. The authors of books being considered for the McKay Prize must be members of the Vergilian Society at the time their books are submitted; for new members or to renew memberships see https://www.vergiliansociety.org/memberships-and-donations.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/21/2022 - 11:44am by .

Symposium Cumanum – Call for Proposals for June 2023

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/21/2022 - 11:40am by .
A row of six people, all but one dressed in varied togas. Two of the men raise their right hands in an oratorical gesture. Above each person is the name of a character in the Phormio.

In a discussion of the concept of the “good slave” in her book Reconstructing the Slave: The Image of the Slave in Ancient Greece, Kelly Wrenhaven rightly argues that “representations of good slaves are as much a part of the rationalizing ideology of slavery as bad slaves, as both help to justify and reinforce the institution.” Examining enslaved nurses depicted on Athenian tombstones, Wrenhaven points out that, out of a total of 15 extant tombstones for nurses, nine include the word chreste. Other inscriptions further confirm the association between the adjective chrestos and enslavement. On a 4th-century tombstone from Thasos, a shepherd named Manes is described as chrestos tais despotais (“useful to his masters”). Enslaved people are also described with this adjective in Menander as well as in Greek tragedy. What we get from considering the adjective chrestos in these and other contexts, as Wrenhaven makes clear, is that “the positive qualities most often attributed to slaves are precisely those which were most useful in the context of slavery.”

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/20/2022 - 10:24am by .
A mosaic with a black background. The top reads SCA PERPETUA. Beneath that is a bust image of a woman in a circle. She has brown hair pulled back, wears gold robes, and has a gold saint halo around her head.

Last year, I published an edition of Perpetua’s Passio together with a group of students: Mia Donato, Carolyn Engargiola, Eli Gendreau-Distler, Elizabeth Hasapis, Jacob Nguyen, Siddharth Pant, Shamika Podila, Anna Riordan, and Oliver Thompson. I worried that a book with ten names in the byline would look like a monstrosity. I worried that, since nine of those names belong to students, people would dismiss it as a school project, of interest only to the parents of the students on the cover. Yet the book has been warmly received: reviewed in journals, adopted for classes, and most recently honored with the 2022 Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award from CAMWS. I say this not to trumpet their work (though I’m certainly proud of it), but rather because I think it speaks to a question that is relevant to the wider scholarly world: what role can students take in academic research and publication?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/13/2022 - 1:50pm by .
A screencap from Hypotactic.com showing the text of Catullus, Poem 1. The words in the second line are highlighted in different colors by syllable.

Hypotactic.com is a website that provides open-license metrical scansions for a broad range of Greek and Latin texts. The main project interface, while relatively simple in its design, supports the user in reading ancient texts metrically through a variety of customizable annotations. The user can toggle between various display formats, including the addition of macrons, scansion, and marks for foot-breaks and/or caesuras. Particularly helpful for reading aloud is the innovative option to apply color-coding that highlights metrical units (and elisions) without the need to consult a separate line of metrical annotations.

A screencap from Hypotactic.com showing the text of Catullus, Poem 1. The words in the second line are highlighted in different colors by syllable.

Figure 1: Clicking on a line reveals the metrical analysis.

In metrically complex texts, such as Plautus or Pindar, every line is annotated with its metrical identification (e.g., ia6 for iambic senarii), such that transitions between meters are obvious to the reader without having to consult a separate commentary.

A screencap showing text with annotations. One line is highlighted green and blue by syllable.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 06/10/2022 - 11:32am by .
TAPA Books Fanned

JOIN TAPA FOR A VIRTUAL OPEN HOUSE

Join co-editors Joshua Billings and Irene Peirano Garrison, and editorial board members Catherine Conybeare, Lorenzo Garcia, and Nandini Pandey, for an open house via Zoom on June 15, 2022 @12:00 pm EDT.

Click Below to Register Now!

CLICK TO REGISTER

*Once you are registered you will receive a Zoom link 24 hours before the event and a reminder on the morning of June 15.

Open house attendees will learn about how to submit to TAPA, the peer review and editorial process, and particular areas of focus.

The Spring 2022 issue of TAPA is now out and that it includes scholarly articles and also short essays on Classics after COVID.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 06/07/2022 - 10:15am by .
Four fragments of pottery with different marks on each. Beneath each photo of a pottery sherd is a drawing of that sherd. From left to right, the sherds are labeled Geometric Mark, Complex Mark, Script Sign, and Multi-sign.

Today we take our saturation in a graphic world for granted. When we see baseball caps with logos or nonsense writing on graphic t-shirts, we don’t immediately recognize them as evidence for writing. But in the case of the Late Bronze Age script of Cyprus (ca. 1600–1000 BCE), the undeciphered Cypro-Minoan script, we have more baseball caps and t-shirts than longer texts. Multi-sign texts with two or more contiguous signs, likely to represent words, number around 250. Most of these multi-sign texts are quite short, consisting of only one or two words.

The baseball caps in this analogy most often take the form of what are called Cypro-Minoan “potmarks,” mercantile vessels bearing single-sign texts. The potmarks contain both Cypro-Minoan script and non-script marks without equivalents in the Cypro-Minoan script. The single-sign text potmarks number over 1000. Like a Yankees cap or a graphic tee, the potmarks employ recognizable and non-recognizable elements of writing. But should they be taken as evidence for literacy?

This is the question at the heart of my dissertation. If the single-sign text potmarks were made by literate individuals, then Cypro-Minoan is not a meagerly attested script, but a mercantile script in wide use within Cyprus and, less widely, outside of it. Significantly, it would be one of the few scripts in the region that survive the Late Bronze Age collapse, and the only one that would be well-documented during this transitional period.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/06/2022 - 12:47pm by .

Call for Papers: AMPRAW (Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World)

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.

AMPRAW 2022 will be held at Yale University from Thursday 3rd November to Saturday 5th November 2022, with the generous support of the Department of Classics at Yale University, the ARCHAIA program, and the Whitney Humanities Centre.

We anticipate holding this conference in a hybrid format. We hope that participants will be able to join us in person in New Haven, but will also allow remote access for both speakers and audience members.

This year’s theme is “Islands”. Possible topics may include, but need not be limited to, the following:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 06/06/2022 - 9:26am by .

posted on behalf of the conference organizers

Classical Studies and the Americas

CIUDAD DE MÉXICO 1-5 / AGOSTO / 2022

The upcoming triannual Congress of FIEC will be a virtual conference, hosted in Mexico City.

Click Here to Register for virtual attendance

Visit the conference website (English and Spanish versions)

The FIEC International Congress for Classical Studies returns to this side of the Atlantic Ocean searching to arouse a plurality of voices. 

Contact for questions and more information: fiec_mexico2022@unam.mx

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 06/03/2022 - 9:51am by .
A dinner spread atop a mosaic-printed tablecloth. Two small glasses of red wine, a round bread loaf sliced into eighths, a terracotta bowl of green olives, and a bowl of pesto with a wooden spoon.

In the latest issue of the CADW magazine, the organ of Wales’ official heritage body, the discussion of the Roman fort at Caerleon was accompanied by a graphic designed for children on the subject of Roman dining. With a Horrible Histories-type tone, the cartoon features a boy asking his mother if his friend can stay for dinner. “I thought we’d go Italian,” says his mother, but it’s not the demanded “Pasta? Pizza? ICE CREAM?”; rather, “Rich Romans had things like…Parrot heads or…dormice…and … sea urchins maybe” (to which the boy says “I feel sick”). But the “lush” counteroffer of fast food “meat patties in bread” — “Roman burgers” — is quickly scotched by the obligatory “fermented fish gut sauce”: the dog says, “Not even I’m eating that!” The closing reference to garum here, seen as undeniably negative, underscores the complex nature of our response to research on ancient foodways; one wonders what would happen if Worcestershire sauce, as standard in Welsh rarebit, were revealed to readers as similarly derived from fermented fish.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 06/02/2022 - 11:15am by .

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