September 2013 President's Letter: Moving towards the Association’s New Name

In the recent election, the members voted to accept the recommendation of the Board of Directors that we should change the name of our organization to “Society for Classical Studies”, with “Founded in 1869 as the American Philological Association” as a permanent subtitle.  In keeping with the truly remarkable dedication and commitment of our membership, 43% of our members voted in this election, at a time when other learned societies report that only 10-15% of their members typically vote in online elections and ballots.  This is the highest participation rate that our Executive Director, Adam Blistein, has seen in the fourteen years of his tenure, and it is probably the highest ever.

Jeffrey Henderson and I have both written to the membership on a number of occasions about this change, which we and the Board regard as an important part of our organization’s overall response to the changing environment we face as Classicists.  To non-specialists, Classical Studies is a more transparent and comprehensible description of what we do, and so is more accessible to the interested outsiders whom we aim to attract with the new website; Classical Studies is also a more all-embracing term for the range of skills and disciplines within our professional domain.  Our organization has successfully become an effective professional organization as well as a learned society, and now we must also become more inclusive and dynamic in our role as a service organization for all those with an interest in Classics.

It is crucial to recognize that the core of our mission remains research and teaching on the ancient world, and the discipline of philology is a central part of that focus.  We are all committed to that core mission, even as we adapt to the more public role that we have taken on in our transition from Gatekeeper to Gateway.  As part of that commitment, our professional journal will have the name of TAPA, as an acronym that honors the traditions and history of our organization.

The Board is now taking steps to implement the change of name to Society for Classical Studies, which will come into effect in the new year.  We will keep you closely informed on the stages of this implementation, and we will welcome feedback as part of this process.  We know that this is a very big change in the history of our group, and all the members of the Board recognize what a wrench it is to let go of the title that we have proudly sailed under since 1869.  We thank the membership for their engaged response since this debate began, and we look forward to seeing our organization move ahead towards its new commitments and responsibilities.

Denis Feeney
President

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The graduate students of the Department of Classics at The Graduate Center at CUNY are happy to share the call for papers for our Spring 2022 14th annual Graduate Conference, entitled ‘Secret Knowledge in the Ancient World: Acquisition and Concealment.’ The conference will be held via Zoom on Friday, May 6, 2022.

We are pleased to announce our keynote speaker, Prof. Radcliffe G. Edmonds III (Bryn Mawr College).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/07/2021 - 3:15pm by Erik Shell.

MAY 12, 2022 – MAY 15, 2022:

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

CALL FOR PAPERS

                                                             (Français à suivre)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/07/2021 - 1:44pm by Erik Shell.
People sit around a table playing a board game. Two women on the left reach their arms across the board. One is pointing with her index finger.

The last decade or so has seen growing interest in “immersive” representations of antiquity: representations that seem to replace a subject’s real experience of the present with compelling simulation of the past. Thus scholars have worked, for example, on “immersion” in Homer, Herodotus and Thucydides, adaptations of Aeschylus, and in postdramatic tragedies. The topic is an outgrowth of longer-standing study of “immersivity” in theater, especially contemporary theater, and in literature, where an early watershed has led more recently to interdisciplinary approaches. In the first half of this post, I sketch a theory for approaching the phenomenon; in the second half, I describe some examples centered on games.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/06/2021 - 12:22pm by Benjamin Stevens.
A mosaic featuring two rows of light-skinned women wearing brown bikinis. On top, two women are running, one hold a large object, and one stands still. On the bottom, one holds a crown, one holds a branch, and two play catch with a ball.

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 125 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. To date, it has funded projects in 28 states and 11 countries, including Canada, the UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/03/2021 - 11:23am by .

In 2021, the second year of the SCS Erich S. Gruen Prize, the selection committee received 15 submissions from graduate students across North America treating aspects of race, ethnicity, or cultural exchange in the ancient Mediterranean. The committee was impressed by the papers’ quality and range of disciplinary perspectives, methodologies, types of evidence, and time periods across the multicultural ancient world.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 11/30/2021 - 9:13am by Helen Cullyer.
An engraving showing a muscly man in a helmet carrying an elderly, also muscly man in his arms. A woman with long hair and a small child are also in motion. The figures are moving over fallen statues and weapons inside a large building next to a staircase

A few years ago, I read an essay by Elena Giusti in the now sadly defunct Eidolon. In this piece, Giusti considers the responsibilities of Classicists today, viewed from her perspective as a scholar of Italian origin based in the UK. Drawing attention to the use of Roman antiquity among the contemporary far-right in Italy, she goes on to state that,

No, it is simply not enough to remind readers that Aeneas was a migrant himself in this loaded climate of the migrant crisis (a recurrent reminder in the Italian press of late — counteracted, I now see, by the young alt-right journal Giovani a destra, whose claim to philological accuracy cares to stress, with Vergil, the Western origin of Dardanus).

This 21st-century contestation over the identity of Aeneas, the origins of Dardanus, founder of Troy, and what, if any, the responsibilities of Classicists confronted with such contestations are, piqued my interest.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/29/2021 - 10:31am by .

The SCS Committee on Contingent Faculty is once again organizing mentoring opportunities for contingent faculty.

You can use this form to sign up to participate in one-on-one mentoring meetups during the AIA/SCS 2022 Annual Meeting (January 6-8). This year there will be both virtual and in-person meetings! Once committee members have received your information, they will match you with either a mentor or mentee.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/29/2021 - 9:06am by Helen Cullyer.
An ornate carved gold square, at the center of which is a stylized horse with a small winged animal resting on its hind quarters. There are decorative patterns forming a border around the horse.

Classical Greeks often articulated a worldview that divided the world between Greeks and all other ethnic groups. This fundamental distinction served to justify war and slavery. The tragedian Aeschylus portrays non-Greeks as slavish and decadent in his Persians. Aristotle thought enslaving non-Greeks was a just cause for waging war (Politics 7.15.21). The Greeks called non-Greeks barbaroi, or “barbarians,” because of the unintelligible sounds of their foreign languages (they said bar bar). The historian Herodotus has long been a central figure in scholarly discourse about the creation and articulation of the boundary between Greeks and others.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/22/2021 - 10:34am by .
The Anthony Fauci Award in STEM and Classics
 
The Classical Association of the Middle West and South is pleased to announce the Anthony Fauci Award in STEM and Classics. This $500 annual award recognizes an undergraduate student who demonstrates outstanding work in both Classics and a STEM discipline (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics). Dr. Fauci graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1962 with a rigorous degree that required both pre-medical and advanced Latin and Greek courses.
View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Sat, 11/20/2021 - 10:36am by Helen Cullyer.

Pushing the Boundaries:

African and Asian Interactions with the Ancient Mediterranean

26th Annual Classics Graduate Student Colloquium

Conducted virtually via Zoom

University of Virginia

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Sat, 11/20/2021 - 10:33am by Helen Cullyer.

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